Orphanages

Orphanages are facilities dedicated to taking care of children that have no adult guardian capable of caring for them, or that have become wards of the state for other reasons.

1,307 Questions
Orphanages

What do you call someone who takes care of children in an orphanage?

Different orphanages use different terms for their staff. If it is a Catholic orphanage you would address each nun by their name and rank (Like Mother Superior) or simply Sister (Maria). They are not recognized by their job duties. If it is a secular orphanage there will be many titles for the staff. The administrator or receptionist at that orphanage can tell you what all the staff are called. Some orphanages are very informal and only go by names. Some of the staff are nurses or doctors so be careful you don't be too informal with them. Most of the staff are licensed workers and they will go by the license name, such as Child Care Worker, Social Worker or Placement Specialist.

101112
Orphanages

What school or orphanage was at 110 Manhattan Ave?

I was resident at 110 Manhattan Ave. as an orphan from May 1939 until early December 1945 when it closed. When I was there, it was known as Stuart House. I have since found out via internet that it was previously known as "Half Orphan Asylum for Destitute and Abandoned Children" and, I believe in early 1900's known as "Protestant Half Orphan Asylum". My grandmother entered the Half-Orphan Asylum (later called the Stuart Home)in 1898, when her mother died. Her father, a new immigrant from Austria, could not work and care for her, but he visited her every weekend. When he remarried six years later, she came back to her home. She had good memories of the Asylum and the loving care she got there. In researching this institution, I find that it was the subject of a long-term study on the homeopathic approach to medicine and the effects of proper maternal care of institutionalized children. I believe this had a great effect on my grandmother, as she loved the women who cared for her there, and was a life-long devotee of homeopathic medicine!

969798
Orphanages

Is there an orphanage in Burlington Vermont?

There isn't an orphanage any longer in Burlington, VT - but for years there was the St. Joseph Orphanage on North Avenue.

737475
Orphanages

What is the caretaker of an orphanage called?

Caretaker!

697071
Adoption
Foster Care
Orphanages

Which are the main requirement to be considered to start a house of children how do you implement them?

There are different types of homes for children and for disabled adults. Normally group homes for children are agencies of the government which places these types of children, mostly delinquent children, in these types of homes and for a specific amount of time. The only other type of homes for children are foster homes, which can be started by any single or couple who are willing to become foster parents. Every state has its own rules by which this is done, so you will have to check with that state. Generally there has to be enough facility to hold a group of foster children, and the potential foster parents must undergo a background check and application process.

232425
Orphanages

What was the edgemeade orphanage in mt. home Idaho?

It was a place to send kids far away from home so they could beat the hell out of them and get away with it. Bill Koon and all his counselors should be hunted down.

I don't know who wrote this but they are half right. I was in Edgemeade of Idaho from 1972 until 1973 until I was "rescued by my mother". The "school" was represented as a place for "emotionally disturbed children" and we were placed there by the courts. Most of our crimes were "adolescent defiant disorder." We were between the ages of 8-17. When you turned 18 they kicked you out because the state or your parents weren't paying the bills anymore. We lived in barrack type housing on a hill outside of town that was infested with bedbugs and mice. We went to "private on campus schools" that consisted of nothing more than being babysat. The University of Pennsylvania would do their psyh. rotations there, so we got some education during the summer. 95% of the children in this school were on heavy doses of psychotropic drugs. We would make fun of the kids doing the Thorazine shuffle. I personally was on Prolixan, Thorazine and these were the ones that I can remember. Oh by the way --I was 14 years old and these medications are counter indicated in children and young adults due to the severity of the side effects. We were given talk therapy which consisted of trying to keep the "counselor" from molesting us or we would be threatened with what they would call a blanket party. (They took everything you had, including your clothing and you would wear a blanket until they felt you were remorseful enough to submit to what ever arbitrary rule you broke. Try that in an Idaho winter!!) Most of the time it was just because you just pissed someone off. I'm lucky I survived and am a successful professional. I pray for the souls that were crushed there and I hope that there were a few like me who MADE IT!! in spite of the hell hole snake pit. (I have never told this story to anyone else except my husband, because quite frankly I doubt if anyone would have believed me.)

The stories by the second author are much closer to the truth. I can't refute the blanket party as I was not there until about 1976. The place I remember was not as bad as described. They did use meds but punishment was basically a several days to a week time out. I can only speak for when I was there but, at that time the place was a summer camp when you compare to a real juvenile correctional inst. Always wanted to touch base with anyone from there who is still alive (I am 52 now).

333435
Orphanages

Where are the orphanages in Australia?

There are no orphanages in Australia. Australia utilises foster homes for children who cannot be cared for by their own family members, and there is a very low number of babies given up for adoption, meaning that these children are adopted out immediately.

There are, however, a number of historical orphanages.

One is Monte Pio Girl's Home, located in Campbell's Hill in New South Wales. See the related link below for more information.

Similarly, St Vincent Home for Children (Brisbane) is an historic orphanage which still cares for children in a variety of way, but is no longer run as an orphanage. See the link below.

434445
Orphanages

What is the procedure to join an orphanage when an adult becomes homeless?

That's my Orphanage... comeOpen you own Orphanage, that's the only answer. As somebody who is an adult can live on his/her own, can earn a living, can take prominent responsibilities, today is a world where globalization is taking place and we have adults who are listing their names in world's richest people, in this kind of age an adult is talking abut an orphanage, strange, I don't want to hurt any body's feelings but that cannot be appreciated.
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Orphanages

I am looking for the history of st domenic's orphanage it was located at 1340 partridge ave university city mo the building is still there but not an orphanage now?

Saint Domenico Italian Orphans Home

1925-1962

Theodore Salorgne House, 1340 Partridge Ave., University City, c. 1893

This modest three-story mansion with a small third floor that can be regarded as an "attic" was built in 1891 and 1892 by Theodore Salorgne, Jr.

The house is built of quarried-stone and has or had a distinctive red Spanish-style clay-tiled roof.

Built centrally on ten acres, the property also contained a barn, a root cellar, a chicken coop, a vineyard, flower gardens (Snapdragons) and several fruit-bearing trees; among them, persimmon trees as well as other large trees.

Theodore Salorgne, senior was a native of France and became a successful carriage maker in

Saint Louis. His son, Theodore, Jr., worked in the family business and continued to live with his family after his marriage to Agnes Conrad in 1873. Theodore Salorgne started the manufacture of carriages in St. Louis in 1838, and continued until 1881, when he died; leaving only one son and a large estate the business was discontinued at that time.

The carriage business closed before 1886 after his father's death in 1881. Theodore engaged in a variety of pursuits after this time, and began building this house in St. Louis County.

The property was sold to the Sisters of Saint Mary in 1909.

(There is a question as to the whether the property was sold to another family prior to the Sisters; currently known as the Franciscan Sisters of Mary via a merger).

The building became a residence for retired and convalescing nuns.

At that time, the St. Mary nuns debated whether a new hospital and convent would be built at the property. It was not.

In 1926, working with the Women's Retreat League, the house was converted into a retreat center. The building was sold once again after the St. Mary order had built a new hospital and convent on Clayton Road.

The property was sold to the St. Domenico Italian Orphans Home. (1931-1962)

The Saint Domenico (Dominic) organization had been founded in 1921 through a bequest of Domenico and Maria Signaigo.

Father Cesare Spigardi from St. Charles Borromeo Church, determined at the time that the bequest was not enough until 1925 when Mrs. Rosa Cafferata left in her will a bequest for the future St. Domenico to Archbishop Glennon.

Mr. Cesare Chichizola, a Board member and his daughter and graduate of St. Elizabeth's Academy was a Precious Blood sister (Sister Mary Rose, C.pp.S) was placed at the new Orphanage. Due to the Orphanage being under the care of Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, whose mother house is in O'Fallon Missouri, she was assigned there. (The sisters were mostly from rural Missouri farming families of German ancestry.)

The Italian community was unsuccessful in getting an Italian order of nuns to care for the mostly Italian-American children at that time. By the late 1950s and 60s, the ancestry of the children were mixed.

The Orphanage started with ten children in 1931 when the mansion was the only building.

In those days, both the Sisters and the children lived in the original mansion.

A first and former resident (H.C., 1933-1936) in 2008 said: "The rules were probably not as stringent during your time there as they were when I was there. We had to maintain silence. We walked up the stair to Chapel single file and silently. There was no loud talk or running inside. I don't remember being outdoors that much, anyway. We went to school in a little two-room schoolhouse at the back of the premises and…. that it was quite hot during the stifling Summer heat when she and the other children lived on the third floor (or attic). The Sister's bedrooms were on the second floor……".

The first floor consisted of two large parlors, a dining room, a small breakfast room, a staircase, a large foyer with a fireplace, a utility room (Pantry) and kitchen. The basement of the mansion was basically laundry and storage.

Access to the mansion is from Partridge Avenue through a stone arched gateway with double gates leading to a circular drive-way that circled around the buildings. The same drive led to a rear exit near the barn leading to Pennsylvania Ave. The two major roads were Page Ave on the north and Olive Street Road on the south. The stone gateway indicated a painted sign on its arched section: "St. Domenico Italian Orphanage".

Saint Domenico attracted the support of many prominent families in the St. Louis Italian American community, and when it was able to build a 2-storey chapel wing (that was added on to the rear of the mansion) in 1938, many of them contributed art-glass windows. The first floor consisted of two dining rooms and the school room with the chapel on the entire second floor. The basement was used as an indoor play area and other events.

In 1947, another building was built and that wing was connected by a mid-air walkway to the mansion on its north side. This 2-storey building would be the new dormitory respectively for the boys on the first floor and the girls on the second floor. Each floor had a private bedroom for one Sister. A rather large basement was a playroom, laundry and other storage closets.

A stone statue of St. Dominic, founder of the Dominican Order was installed in front of the mansion as a gift from Domenica Casaleggi, a California resident. The statute was the most pronounced feature standing in front of the Home.

The immediate neighborhood community consisted of middle class Jewish families, thus the SIsters and the children were the only Gentiles. It was not unusual to observe a Sister conversing with their Jewish neighbors.Wed Aug 13 15:45:34 2008

Another former resident: "I would like to locate others who were living at St. Domenico. I have a lot of good memories from those days in 1954 to 1958. Recently was in touch with one fellow from there. Is there an alumni group from this home? I would love to attend a reunion. I remember fondly the nuns: Sr. Elizabeth Marie, Sr. Mary Rose, Sr. Robert Thomas, Sr. Gregory, and many others. Remember making fudge and carmel with Sr. Elizabeth Marie. We would each get one small piece in wax paper to eat while we watched Shirley Temple movies. I loved that big old house and the grounds it sat on. It is still there. Enjoyed climbing the trees and playing in the sandbox all day long in the summer. (After we did our chores, of course.) Please contact me if youlived at St.. Domenico's Italian Home in St. Louis MO".

By the 1970s and the 1980s, the 2-storey barn, the chicken coop and other stand-alone structures (Gazebos) would be torn-down due to age. (One of the more prominent gaezbo housing the Holy Family was a favorite for the kids who would hide and seek.)

The root cellar was filled-in. The vinyard was removed along with the original stone-arched gateway and gates. Some of the large Oak and Locust trees are gone. The statute of St. Dominic has long gone. The clay-tiled roof was replaced by either slate or shingle.

By this time, there is nothing left to indicate that this was ever St. Domenico except the original Theodore Salorgne mansion.

By 1961-1962, the Italian Orphans Home would close. Sisters Mary Rose, Elizabeth Marie, Timothy, Isabel and Gregory et al received the news of the closing of this rather unique institution. (Pictured above is Sister Julitta Maurer, one of the former teachers wearing the new habit adopted by Congregation of the Most Precious Blood sometime in 1961-1962.)

The need for full-service orphanages decreased, and in 1962 the property became Mercita Hall, a Group Home for teenage girls who were not being served by foster homes. Mercita Hall was operated by the Sisters of Mercy and gradually was replaced by Marian Hall, another agency serving severely-disturbed and behaviorally-disordered youth. By this time, there were very few nuns left and most staff were lay-women with specialized training.

In 1988 the property was transferred to the Archbishop of the St. Louis Archdiocese.

It appeared that at one time, the property would be re-developed for housing.

The original ten acres was laid out by as St. Domenico Court but it never happened.

It was later subdivided by Mary Stock as Penn Park and Roberts Court after 1970 with the remainder of the property to be known as Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth sometime in 2008 after its final consolidation of four pre-existing Catholic Service Agencies into one.

As of Spring, 2008, new Construction of an additional building to the rear of the former chapel /school room / dining room building (1938) is due to be completed in 2009. This expansion indicate that the property has become a small complex or campus consisting of 4 buildings providing numerous services for children and youth.

The new building standing on the former vinyard and drive will attach itself to the chapel-wing building. The original mansion building, c1893; the chapel / school room / dining room building, 1938, and the dormitory building, 1947 will join the new building.

All of the original founders have died and most of the former children are now elderly. The memories are fading.

The Current Occupant of the mansion-property is:

Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth

1340 Partridge Avenue

St. Louis MO 63130

Phone: 314.854.5700

Fax: 314.854.5748

Disclaimer. The above information on this brief history of this institution is based on anecdotal information and several other sources that may not necessarily be accurate. Fifty per cent was taken from the City of University City, MO. website.

Additional information was added to the primary source.

If you think the information is inaccurate or inappropriate, anyone is welcome to write me @ pgenna2@juno.com. Thank you.

Acknowledgments:

City of University City, MO

Sisters of St. Mary (Franciscan Sisters of Mary), St. Louis, MO

Women's Retreat League, St. Louis, MO (Closed)

Fratellanza Society, St. Louis, MO

Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, O'Fallon, MO

St. Charles Borromeo Church, St. Louis City, MO (Closed)

St. Elizabeth Academy, St. Louis, MO

The Maurer Family, CppS: O'Fallon, MO

St. Ambrose Church, The Hill, St. Louis, MO

Sisters of Mercy, St. Louis, MO

Archdiocese of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

Mary Stock

Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth, University City, MOSaint Domenico Italian Orphans Home

1925-1962

Theodore Salorgne House, 1340 Partridge Ave., University City, c. 1893

This modest three-story mansion with a small third floor that can be regarded as an "attic" was built in 1891 and 1892 by Theodore Salorgne, Jr.

The house is built of quarried-stone and has or had a distinctive red Spanish-style clay-tiled roof.

Built centrally on ten acres, the property also contained a barn, a root cellar, a chicken coop, a vineyard, flower gardens (Snapdragons) and several fruit-bearing trees; among them, persimmon trees as well as other large trees.

Theodore Salorgne, senior was a native of France and became a successful carriage maker in

Saint Louis. His son, Theodore, Jr., worked in the family business and continued to live with his family after his marriage to Agnes Conrad in 1873. Theodore Salorgne started the manufacture of carriages in St. Louis in 1838, and continued until 1881, when he died; leaving only one son and a large estate the business was discontinued at that time.

The carriage business closed before 1886 after his father's death in 1881. Theodore engaged in a variety of pursuits after this time, and began building this house in St. Louis County.

The property was sold to the Sisters of Saint Mary in 1909.

(There is a question as to the whether the property was sold to another family prior to the Sisters; currently known as the Franciscan Sisters of Mary via a merger).

The building became a residence for retired and convalescing nuns.

At that time, the St. Mary nuns debated whether a new hospital and convent would be built at the property. It was not.

In 1926, working with the Women's Retreat League, the house was converted into a retreat center. The building was sold once again after the St. Mary order had built a new hospital and convent on Clayton Road.

The property was sold to the St. Domenico Italian Orphans Home. (1931-1962)

The Saint Domenico (Dominic) organization had been founded in 1921 through a bequest of Domenico and Maria Signaigo.

Father Cesare Spigardi from St. Charles Borromeo Church, determined at the time that the bequest was not enough until 1925 when Mrs. Rosa Cafferata left in her will a bequest for the future St. Domenico to Archbishop Glennon.

Mr. Cesare Chichizola, a Board member and his daughter and graduate of St. Elizabeth's Academy was a Precious Blood sister (Sister Mary Rose, C.pp.S) was placed at the new Orphanage. Due to the Orphanage being under the care of Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, whose mother house is in O'Fallon Missouri, she was assigned there. (The sisters were mostly from rural Missouri farming families of German ancestry.)

The Italian community was unsuccessful in getting an Italian order of nuns to care for the mostly Italian-American children at that time. By the late 1950s and 60s, the ancestry of the children were mixed.

The Orphanage started with ten children in 1931 when the mansion was the only building.

In those days, both the Sisters and the children lived in the original mansion.

A first and former resident (H.C., 1933-1936) in 2008 said: "The rules were probably not as stringent during your time there as they were when I was there. We had to maintain silence. We walked up the stair to Chapel single file and silently. There was no loud talk or running inside. I don't remember being outdoors that much, anyway. We went to school in a little two-room schoolhouse at the back of the premises and…. that it was quite hot during the stifling Summer heat when she and the other children lived on the third floor (or attic). The Sister's bedrooms were on the second floor……".

The first floor consisted of two large parlors, a dining room, a small breakfast room, a staircase, a large foyer with a fireplace, a utility room (Pantry) and kitchen. The basement of the mansion was basically laundry and storage.

Access to the mansion is from Partridge Avenue through a stone arched gateway with double gates leading to a circular drive-way that circled around the buildings. The same drive led to a rear exit near the barn leading to Pennsylvania Ave. The two major roads were Page Ave on the north and Olive Street Road on the south. The stone gateway indicated a painted sign on its arched section: "St. Domenico Italian Orphanage".

Saint Domenico attracted the support of many prominent families in the St. Louis Italian American community, and when it was able to build a 2-storey chapel wing (that was added on to the rear of the mansion) in 1938, many of them contributed art-glass windows. The first floor consisted of two dining rooms and the school room with the chapel on the entire second floor. The basement was used as an indoor play area and other events.

In 1947, another building was built and that wing was connected by a mid-air walkway to the mansion on its north side. This 2-storey building would be the new dormitory respectively for the boys on the first floor and the girls on the second floor. Each floor had a private bedroom for one Sister. A rather large basement was a playroom, laundry and other storage closets.

A stone statue of St. Dominic, founder of the Dominican Order was installed in front of the mansion as a gift from Domenica Casaleggi, a California resident. The statute was the most pronounced feature standing in front of the Home.

The immediate neighborhood community consisted of middle class Jewish families, thus the SIsters and the children were the only Gentiles. It was not unusual to observe a Sister conversing with their Jewish neighbors.Wed Aug 13 15:45:34 2008

Another former resident: "I would like to locate others who were living at St. Domenico. I have a lot of good memories from those days in 1954 to 1958. Recently was in touch with one fellow from there. Is there an alumni group from this home? I would love to attend a reunion. I remember fondly the nuns: Sr. Elizabeth Marie, Sr. Mary Rose, Sr. Robert Thomas, Sr. Gregory, and many others. Remember making fudge and carmel with Sr. Elizabeth Marie. We would each get one small piece in wax paper to eat while we watched Shirley Temple movies. I loved that big old house and the grounds it sat on. It is still there. Enjoyed climbing the trees and playing in the sandbox all day long in the summer. (After we did our chores, of course.) Please contact me if youlived at St.. Domenico's Italian Home in St. Louis MO".

By the 1970s and the 1980s, the 2-storey barn, the chicken coop and other stand-alone structures (Gazebos) would be torn-down due to age. (One of the more prominent gaezbo housing the Holy Family was a favorite for the kids who would hide and seek.)

The root cellar was filled-in. The vinyard was removed along with the original stone-arched gateway and gates. Some of the large Oak and Locust trees are gone. The statute of St. Dominic has long gone. The clay-tiled roof was replaced by either slate or shingle.

By this time, there is nothing left to indicate that this was ever St. Domenico except the original Theodore Salorgne mansion.

By 1961-1962, the Italian Orphans Home would close. Sisters Mary Rose, Elizabeth Marie, Timothy, Isabel and Gregory et al received the news of the closing of this rather unique institution. (Pictured above is Sister Julitta Maurer, one of the former teachers wearing the new habit adopted by Congregation of the Most Precious Blood sometime in 1961-1962.)

The need for full-service orphanages decreased, and in 1962 the property became Mercita Hall, a Group Home for teenage girls who were not being served by foster homes. Mercita Hall was operated by the Sisters of Mercy and gradually was replaced by Marian Hall, another agency serving severely-disturbed and behaviorally-disordered youth. By this time, there were very few nuns left and most staff were lay-women with specialized training.

In 1988 the property was transferred to the Archbishop of the St. Louis Archdiocese.

It appeared that at one time, the property would be re-developed for housing.

The original ten acres was laid out by as St. Domenico Court but it never happened.

It was later subdivided by Mary Stock as Penn Park and Roberts Court after 1970 with the remainder of the property to be known as Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth sometime in 2008 after its final consolidation of four pre-existing Catholic Service Agencies into one.

As of Spring, 2008, new Construction of an additional building to the rear of the former chapel /school room / dining room building (1938) is due to be completed in 2009. This expansion indicate that the property has become a small complex or campus consisting of 4 buildings providing numerous services for children and youth.

The new building standing on the former vinyard and drive will attach itself to the chapel-wing building. The original mansion building, c1893; the chapel / school room / dining room building, 1938, and the dormitory building, 1947 will join the new building.

All of the original founders have died and most of the former children are now elderly. The memories are fading.

The Current Occupant of the mansion-property is:

Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth

1340 Partridge Avenue

St. Louis MO 63130

Phone: 314.854.5700

Fax: 314.854.5748

Disclaimer. The above information on this brief history of this institution is based on anecdotal information and several other sources that may not necessarily be accurate. Fifty per cent was taken from the City of University City, MO. website.

Additional information was added to the primary source.

If you think the information is inaccurate or inappropriate, anyone is welcome to write me @ pgenna2@juno.com. Thank you.

Acknowledgments:

City of University City, MO

Sisters of St. Mary (Franciscan Sisters of Mary), St. Louis, MO

Women's Retreat League, St. Louis, MO (Closed)

Fratellanza Society, St. Louis, MO

Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, O'Fallon, MO

St. Charles Borromeo Church, St. Louis City, MO (Closed)

St. Elizabeth Academy, St. Louis, MO

The Maurer Family, CppS: O'Fallon, MO

St. Ambrose Church, The Hill, St. Louis, MO

Sisters of Mercy, St. Louis, MO

Archdiocese of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

Mary Stock

Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth, University City, MOSaint Domenico Italian Orphans Home

1925-1962

Theodore Salorgne House, 1340 Partridge Ave., University City, c. 1893

This modest three-story mansion with a small third floor that can be regarded as an "attic" was built in 1891 and 1892 by Theodore Salorgne, Jr.

The house is built of quarried-stone and has or had a distinctive red Spanish-style clay-tiled roof.

Built centrally on ten acres, the property also contained a barn, a root cellar, a chicken coop, a vineyard, flower gardens (Snapdragons) and several fruit-bearing trees; among them, persimmon trees as well as other large trees.

Theodore Salorgne, senior was a native of France and became a successful carriage maker in

Saint Louis. His son, Theodore, Jr., worked in the family business and continued to live with his family after his marriage to Agnes Conrad in 1873. Theodore Salorgne started the manufacture of carriages in St. Louis in 1838, and continued until 1881, when he died; leaving only one son and a large estate the business was discontinued at that time.

The carriage business closed before 1886 after his father's death in 1881. Theodore engaged in a variety of pursuits after this time, and began building this house in St. Louis County.

The property was sold to the Sisters of Saint Mary in 1909.

(There is a question as to the whether the property was sold to another family prior to the Sisters; currently known as the Franciscan Sisters of Mary via a merger).

The building became a residence for retired and convalescing nuns.

At that time, the St. Mary nuns debated whether a new hospital and convent would be built at the property. It was not.

In 1926, working with the Women's Retreat League, the house was converted into a retreat center. The building was sold once again after the St. Mary order had built a new hospital and convent on Clayton Road.

The property was sold to the St. Domenico Italian Orphans Home. (1931-1962)

The Saint Domenico (Dominic) organization had been founded in 1921 through a bequest of Domenico and Maria Signaigo.

Father Cesare Spigardi from St. Charles Borromeo Church, determined at the time that the bequest was not enough until 1925 when Mrs. Rosa Cafferata left in her will a bequest for the future St. Domenico to Archbishop Glennon.

Mr. Cesare Chichizola, a Board member and his daughter and graduate of St. Elizabeth's Academy was a Precious Blood sister (Sister Mary Rose, C.pp.S) was placed at the new Orphanage. Due to the Orphanage being under the care of Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, whose mother house is in O'Fallon Missouri, she was assigned there. (The sisters were mostly from rural Missouri farming families of German ancestry.)

The Italian community was unsuccessful in getting an Italian order of nuns to care for the mostly Italian-American children at that time. By the late 1950s and 60s, the ancestry of the children were mixed.

The Orphanage started with ten children in 1931 when the mansion was the only building.

In those days, both the Sisters and the children lived in the original mansion.

A first and former resident (H.C., 1933-1936) in 2008 said: "The rules were probably not as stringent during your time there as they were when I was there. We had to maintain silence. We walked up the stair to Chapel single file and silently. There was no loud talk or running inside. I don't remember being outdoors that much, anyway. We went to school in a little two-room schoolhouse at the back of the premises and…. that it was quite hot during the stifling Summer heat when she and the other children lived on the third floor (or attic). The Sister's bedrooms were on the second floor……".

The first floor consisted of two large parlors, a dining room, a small breakfast room, a staircase, a large foyer with a fireplace, a utility room (Pantry) and kitchen. The basement of the mansion was basically laundry and storage.

Access to the mansion is from Partridge Avenue through a stone arched gateway with double gates leading to a circular drive-way that circled around the buildings. The same drive led to a rear exit near the barn leading to Pennsylvania Ave. The two major roads were Page Ave on the north and Olive Street Road on the south. The stone gateway indicated a painted sign on its arched section: "St. Domenico Italian Orphanage".

Saint Domenico attracted the support of many prominent families in the St. Louis Italian American community, and when it was able to build a 2-storey chapel wing (that was added on to the rear of the mansion) in 1938, many of them contributed art-glass windows. The first floor consisted of two dining rooms and the school room with the chapel on the entire second floor. The basement was used as an indoor play area and other events.

In 1947, another building was built and that wing was connected by a mid-air walkway to the mansion on its north side. This 2-storey building would be the new dormitory respectively for the boys on the first floor and the girls on the second floor. Each floor had a private bedroom for one Sister. A rather large basement was a playroom, laundry and other storage closets.

A stone statue of St. Dominic, founder of the Dominican Order was installed in front of the mansion as a gift from Domenica Casaleggi, a California resident. The statute was the most pronounced feature standing in front of the Home.

The immediate neighborhood community consisted of middle class Jewish families, thus the SIsters and the children were the only Gentiles. It was not unusual to observe a Sister conversing with their Jewish neighbors.Wed Aug 13 15:45:34 2008

Another former resident: "I would like to locate others who were living at St. Domenico. I have a lot of good memories from those days in 1954 to 1958. Recently was in touch with one fellow from there. Is there an alumni group from this home? I would love to attend a reunion. I remember fondly the nuns: Sr. Elizabeth Marie, Sr. Mary Rose, Sr. Robert Thomas, Sr. Gregory, and many others. Remember making fudge and carmel with Sr. Elizabeth Marie. We would each get one small piece in wax paper to eat while we watched Shirley Temple movies. I loved that big old house and the grounds it sat on. It is still there. Enjoyed climbing the trees and playing in the sandbox all day long in the summer. (After we did our chores, of course.) Please contact me if youlived at St.. Domenico's Italian Home in St. Louis MO".

By the 1970s and the 1980s, the 2-storey barn, the chicken coop and other stand-alone structures (Gazebos) would be torn-down due to age. (One of the more prominent gaezbo housing the Holy Family was a favorite for the kids who would hide and seek.)

The root cellar was filled-in. The vinyard was removed along with the original stone-arched gateway and gates. Some of the large Oak and Locust trees are gone. The statute of St. Dominic has long gone. The clay-tiled roof was replaced by either slate or shingle.

By this time, there is nothing left to indicate that this was ever St. Domenico except the original Theodore Salorgne mansion.

By 1961-1962, the Italian Orphans Home would close. Sisters Mary Rose, Elizabeth Marie, Timothy, Isabel and Gregory et al received the news of the closing of this rather unique institution. (Pictured above is Sister Julitta Maurer, one of the former teachers wearing the new habit adopted by Congregation of the Most Precious Blood sometime in 1961-1962.)

The need for full-service orphanages decreased, and in 1962 the property became Mercita Hall, a Group Home for teenage girls who were not being served by foster homes. Mercita Hall was operated by the Sisters of Mercy and gradually was replaced by Marian Hall, another agency serving severely-disturbed and behaviorally-disordered youth. By this time, there were very few nuns left and most staff were lay-women with specialized training.

In 1988 the property was transferred to the Archbishop of the St. Louis Archdiocese.

It appeared that at one time, the property would be re-developed for housing.

The original ten acres was laid out by as St. Domenico Court but it never happened.

It was later subdivided by Mary Stock as Penn Park and Roberts Court after 1970 with the remainder of the property to be known as Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth sometime in 2008 after its final consolidation of four pre-existing Catholic Service Agencies into one.

As of Spring, 2008, new Construction of an additional building to the rear of the former chapel /school room / dining room building (1938) is due to be completed in 2009. This expansion indicate that the property has become a small complex or campus consisting of 4 buildings providing numerous services for children and youth.

The new building standing on the former vinyard and drive will attach itself to the chapel-wing building. The original mansion building, c1893; the chapel / school room / dining room building, 1938, and the dormitory building, 1947 will join the new building.

All of the original founders have died and most of the former children are now elderly. The memories are fading.

The Current Occupant of the mansion-property is:

Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth

1340 Partridge Avenue

St. Louis MO 63130

Phone: 314.854.5700

Fax: 314.854.5748

Disclaimer. The above information on this brief history of this institution is based on anecdotal information and several other sources that may not necessarily be accurate. Fifty per cent was taken from the City of University City, MO. website.

Additional information was added to the primary source.

If you think the information is inaccurate or inappropriate, anyone is welcome to write me @ pgenna2@juno.com. Thank you.

Acknowledgments:

City of University City, MO

Sisters of St. Mary (Franciscan Sisters of Mary), St. Louis, MO

Women's Retreat League, St. Louis, MO (Closed)

Fratellanza Society, St. Louis, MO

Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, O'Fallon, MO

St. Charles Borromeo Church, St. Louis City, MO (Closed)

St. Elizabeth Academy, St. Louis, MO

The Maurer Family, CppS: O'Fallon, MO

St. Ambrose Church, The Hill, St. Louis, MO

Sisters of Mercy, St. Louis, MO

Archdiocese of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

Mary Stock

Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth, University City, MOSaint Domenico Italian Orphans Home

1925-1962

Theodore Salorgne House, 1340 Partridge Ave., University City, c. 1893

This modest three-story mansion with a small third floor that can be regarded as an "attic" was built in 1891 and 1892 by Theodore Salorgne, Jr.

The house is built of quarried-stone and has or had a distinctive red Spanish-style clay-tiled roof.

Built centrally on ten acres, the property also contained a barn, a root cellar, a chicken coop, a vineyard, flower gardens (Snapdragons) and several fruit-bearing trees; among them, persimmon trees as well as other large trees.

Theodore Salorgne, senior was a native of France and became a successful carriage maker in

Saint Louis. His son, Theodore, Jr., worked in the family business and continued to live with his family after his marriage to Agnes Conrad in 1873. Theodore Salorgne started the manufacture of carriages in St. Louis in 1838, and continued until 1881, when he died; leaving only one son and a large estate the business was discontinued at that time.

The carriage business closed before 1886 after his father's death in 1881. Theodore engaged in a variety of pursuits after this time, and began building this house in St. Louis County.

The property was sold to the Sisters of Saint Mary in 1909.

(There is a question as to the whether the property was sold to another family prior to the Sisters; currently known as the Franciscan Sisters of Mary via a merger).

The building became a residence for retired and convalescing nuns.

At that time, the St. Mary nuns debated whether a new hospital and convent would be built at the property. It was not.

In 1926, working with the Women's Retreat League, the house was converted into a retreat center. The building was sold once again after the St. Mary order had built a new hospital and convent on Clayton Road.

The property was sold to the St. Domenico Italian Orphans Home. (1931-1962)

The Saint Domenico (Dominic) organization had been founded in 1921 through a bequest of Domenico and Maria Signaigo.

Father Cesare Spigardi from St. Charles Borromeo Church, determined at the time that the bequest was not enough until 1925 when Mrs. Rosa Cafferata left in her will a bequest for the future St. Domenico to Archbishop Glennon.

Mr. Cesare Chichizola, a Board member and his daughter and graduate of St. Elizabeth's Academy was a Precious Blood sister (Sister Mary Rose, C.pp.S) was placed at the new Orphanage. Due to the Orphanage being under the care of Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, whose mother house is in O'Fallon Missouri, she was assigned there. (The sisters were mostly from rural Missouri farming families of German ancestry.)

The Italian community was unsuccessful in getting an Italian order of nuns to care for the mostly Italian-American children at that time. By the late 1950s and 60s, the ancestry of the children were mixed.

The Orphanage started with ten children in 1931 when the mansion was the only building.

In those days, both the Sisters and the children lived in the original mansion.

A first and former resident (H.C., 1933-1936) in 2008 said: "The rules were probably not as stringent during your time there as they were when I was there. We had to maintain silence. We walked up the stair to Chapel single file and silently. There was no loud talk or running inside. I don't remember being outdoors that much, anyway. We went to school in a little two-room schoolhouse at the back of the premises and…. that it was quite hot during the stifling Summer heat when she and the other children lived on the third floor (or attic). The Sister's bedrooms were on the second floor……".

The first floor consisted of two large parlors, a dining room, a small breakfast room, a staircase, a large foyer with a fireplace, a utility room (Pantry) and kitchen. The basement of the mansion was basically laundry and storage.

Access to the mansion is from Partridge Avenue through a stone arched gateway with double gates leading to a circular drive-way that circled around the buildings. The same drive led to a rear exit near the barn leading to Pennsylvania Ave. The two major roads were Page Ave on the north and Olive Street Road on the south. The stone gateway indicated a painted sign on its arched section: "St. Domenico Italian Orphanage".

Saint Domenico attracted the support of many prominent families in the St. Louis Italian American community, and when it was able to build a 2-storey chapel wing (that was added on to the rear of the mansion) in 1938, many of them contributed art-glass windows. The first floor consisted of two dining rooms and the school room with the chapel on the entire second floor. The basement was used as an indoor play area and other events.

In 1947, another building was built and that wing was connected by a mid-air walkway to the mansion on its north side. This 2-storey building would be the new dormitory respectively for the boys on the first floor and the girls on the second floor. Each floor had a private bedroom for one Sister. A rather large basement was a playroom, laundry and other storage closets.

A stone statue of St. Dominic, founder of the Dominican Order was installed in front of the mansion as a gift from Domenica Casaleggi, a California resident. The statute was the most pronounced feature standing in front of the Home.

The immediate neighborhood community consisted of middle class Jewish families, thus the SIsters and the children were the only Gentiles. It was not unusual to observe a Sister conversing with their Jewish neighbors.Wed Aug 13 15:45:34 2008

Another former resident: "I would like to locate others who were living at St. Domenico. I have a lot of good memories from those days in 1954 to 1958. Recently was in touch with one fellow from there. Is there an alumni group from this home? I would love to attend a reunion. I remember fondly the nuns: Sr. Elizabeth Marie, Sr. Mary Rose, Sr. Robert Thomas, Sr. Gregory, and many others. Remember making fudge and carmel with Sr. Elizabeth Marie. We would each get one small piece in wax paper to eat while we watched Shirley Temple movies. I loved that big old house and the grounds it sat on. It is still there. Enjoyed climbing the trees and playing in the sandbox all day long in the summer. (After we did our chores, of course.) Please contact me if youlived at St.. Domenico's Italian Home in St. Louis MO".

By the 1970s and the 1980s, the 2-storey barn, the chicken coop and other stand-alone structures (Gazebos) would be torn-down due to age. (One of the more prominent gaezbo housing the Holy Family was a favorite for the kids who would hide and seek.)

The root cellar was filled-in. The vinyard was removed along with the original stone-arched gateway and gates. Some of the large Oak and Locust trees are gone. The statute of St. Dominic has long gone. The clay-tiled roof was replaced by either slate or shingle.

By this time, there is nothing left to indicate that this was ever St. Domenico except the original Theodore Salorgne mansion.

By 1961-1962, the Italian Orphans Home would close. Sisters Mary Rose, Elizabeth Marie, Timothy, Isabel and Gregory et al received the news of the closing of this rather unique institution. (Pictured above is Sister Julitta Maurer, one of the former teachers wearing the new habit adopted by Congregation of the Most Precious Blood sometime in 1961-1962.)

The need for full-service orphanages decreased, and in 1962 the property became Mercita Hall, a Group Home for teenage girls who were not being served by foster homes. Mercita Hall was operated by the Sisters of Mercy and gradually was replaced by Marian Hall, another agency serving severely-disturbed and behaviorally-disordered youth. By this time, there were very few nuns left and most staff were lay-women with specialized training.

In 1988 the property was transferred to the Archbishop of the St. Louis Archdiocese.

It appeared that at one time, the property would be re-developed for housing.

The original ten acres was laid out by as St. Domenico Court but it never happened.

It was later subdivided by Mary Stock as Penn Park and Roberts Court after 1970 with the remainder of the property to be known as Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth sometime in 2008 after its final consolidation of four pre-existing Catholic Service Agencies into one.

As of Spring, 2008, new Construction of an additional building to the rear of the former chapel /school room / dining room building (1938) is due to be completed in 2009. This expansion indicate that the property has become a small complex or campus consisting of 4 buildings providing numerous services for children and youth.

The new building standing on the former vinyard and drive will attach itself to the chapel-wing building. The original mansion building, c1893; the chapel / school room / dining room building, 1938, and the dormitory building, 1947 will join the new building.

All of the original founders have died and most of the former children are now elderly. The memories are fading.

The Current Occupant of the mansion-property is:

Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth

1340 Partridge Avenue

St. Louis MO 63130

Phone: 314.854.5700

Fax: 314.854.5748

Disclaimer. The above information on this brief history of this institution is based on anecdotal information and several other sources that may not necessarily be accurate. Fifty per cent was taken from the City of University City, MO. website.

Additional information was added to the primary source.

If you think the information is inaccurate or inappropriate, anyone is welcome to write me @ pgenna2@juno.com. Thank you.

Acknowledgments:

City of University City, MO

Sisters of St. Mary (Franciscan Sisters of Mary), St. Louis, MO

Women's Retreat League, St. Louis, MO (Closed)

Fratellanza Society, St. Louis, MO

Sisters of the Most Precious Blood, O'Fallon, MO

St. Charles Borromeo Church, St. Louis City, MO (Closed)

St. Elizabeth Academy, St. Louis, MO

The Maurer Family, CppS: O'Fallon, MO

St. Ambrose Church, The Hill, St. Louis, MO

Sisters of Mercy, St. Louis, MO

Archdiocese of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO

Mary Stock

Good Shepherd Services for Children and Youth, University City, MO

414243
Orphanages

How can a 12 year old be put in a orphanage?

depends are his parents dead or unable to care for him and does he have no realitives or anywhere else to go

414243
Orphanages

What was the name of the orphanage where Lane Tech Prep School in Chicago now stands and what year did it close down?

Haven't been able to find the specific answer to this. I went to Lane, but never heard anything about an orphanage on the site. Did find the following websites that list "asylums" in Chicago in 1900 & 05. http://www.alookatcook.com/1900/1900_benevolence.htm http://iltrails.org/cook/1905asylums.html There are a couple nearby, but nothing at Western & Addison.

414243
Orphanages

What was the name of the Matron of the orphanage where Tom Riddle grew up?

Her name was Mrs. Cole.

394041
Orphanages

Will there be auditions for tom riddle when he is in the orphanage?

Yes there will be auditions. What I don't know is where or when it takes place, but anyway: the rumours are going that Titan Tiffin (Ralph Fiènnes' [who plays the mature Voldemort] nephew) would be cast! Nothing has been confirmed by anyone yet, but I think we'll hear about it soon.

353637
Orphanages

What was life in a orphanage like in the 1930s for children?

raddley

333435
Orphanages

How many orphanages are in Australia?

There are no orphanages in Australia. Australia utilises foster homes for children who cannot be cared for by their own family members, and there is a very low number of babies given up for adoption, meaning that these children are adopted out immediately.

252627
Orphanages

What does it feel like to have nobody want to adopt you from an orphanage?

This will take imagination. When in a restaurant, the people who talk to you are the waiter and the bus attendants who are all business-like, similar to the attendants of the orphanage. All the people you see enter and leave the location without a glance at you because they don't desire to get to know you. Potential parents pass you up because they don't desire to get to know you. Walking around the city or in a mall where hundreds of people mingle around and talk to others except you is an example too. A feeling of unwantedness. Good for nothing. Like a chained dog on a leash in the back yard without shelter in a thunderstorm. But if you can't really feel that type of abandoned loneliness, someone cares. You just can't see it.

333435
Orphanages

What is a name of an orphanage in London?

Coram Orphanage

293031
Orphanages

Has atheism established hospitals and orphanages?

Atheism isn't a belief system - there aren't regular meetings for atheists! - so you won't see hospitals or orphanages called "The Atheist Hospital", but many leading humanitarians have been or are atheists and the oldest hospital in the USA was founded by a secular government.

272829
Orphanages

Did Coco Chanel like being in the orphanage?

Of course not. She was treated unfairly for the fact that her parents were not married when she was born. She strived to be better than what anyone ever expected of her, and that is perhaps the reason why she led such an amazing career and life.

252627
Orphanages

Where is bud sent to from the orphanage?

irdk

345
Tattoos and Body Art
Libraries and Library History
Orphanages

Who started the first tattoo parlor in the US?

bert grimms long beach, ca. the pike

New Answer: According to "Stoney Knows How - Life as a Sideshow Tattoo Artist" - Alan Govenar The Earliest recorded professional tattoo artist in America was Martin Hildebrandt who established a permanent Tattoo shop on Oak Street in NY City in 1846 Bert Grimm 1900 - 1985 (according to the Tattoo Archive http://www.tattooarchive.com/history/grimm_bert.htm)

-im_marmalade

232425
Orphanages

Were there orphanages in New France in the 1600s?

OH I~ SURE HOPE~ SOOOOOOO~

123
Orphanages

Where is the orphanage on Neopets?

You can locate the pound by hovering over "Pet Central" and clicking on "Neopian Pound".

212223
Orphanages

Is there an orphanage in South Australia?

There are no longer any orphanages anywhere in Australia. There are foster programmes throughout the country, but no facility to adopt from orphanages.

212223
Orphanages

What is the correct name for the person who runs an orphanage?

they could be called an orphan keeper

192021

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