Osmosis

Osmosis is the passing of liquid, through a semipermeable material, from a low solute concentration to a high solute concentration.

2,107 Questions
Osmosis

How does concentration affect osmosis?

When there is a higher concentration of water on one side and a lower concentration on the other side, the water on the side with the higher concentration will naturally move to the side with the lower concentration in order to balance the two sides.

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Will reverse osmosis remove chromium?

Yes. It's generally accepted that reverse osmosis reduces chromium by 95% or so.

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What are the conditions required for osmosis to occur?

The following conditions are required for osmosis to occur:

1) A selectively-permeable membrane

2) Concentration difference

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Osmosis

Osmosis is important survival of cells?

Yes it is

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Osmosis

An example of osmosis in animals?

A fish called tillapia absorb some of the salt solution when is been kept in it

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Osmosis

What is diffusion and osmosis?

Diffusion is the tendency of particles in a gas or liquid to become evenly distributed by moving from areas of greater concentration to areas of lesser concentration. Diffusion is driven by the kinetic energy of particles that is a consequence of temperature. It is an inherently random process and particles continue to spread out until they are evenly distributed within the enclosed area.

Biologically, diffusion is the cause of random movement or net movement of particles from an area of high concentration towards an area of low concentration. Osmosis refers to the flow of particles across a membrane. When active transport is absent, diffusion provides the driving force for osmosis across a fully permeable or partially permeable membrane.

Fully permeable: all particles can move through.

Partially permeable: only certain particles an move through.

Active transport: biochemical processes expend energy to move particles.

Note: Reverse osmosis is basically filtering. Pressure is greater on one side of a partially permeable membrane pushing particles through it.

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Osmosis

What is the definition of osmosis?

The four main kinds of passive transport are diffusion, facilitated diffusion, filtration and osmosis.

Passive transport is the movement of a substance across a cell membrane with its concentration gradient (from high to low concentration) and it uses no energy.

Osmosis is a special term used when water is the substance being moved.

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Osmosis

How are osmosis and diffusion similar to homeostasis?

tecnicly, they arn't

osmosis (in terms of life) is the diffusion of water across the cell membrane

diffusion is the natral movement of particls from a higher consintration to a lower consintration.

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When is osmosis used?

in a bakery

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What causes osmosis?

Osmosis is the passive diffusion of water across a partially permeable (or semipermeable) membrane with a net transport from a region of high water potential to a region of low water potential.

High water potential means there is a relatively low concentration of solutes (a low solute potential), whereas low water potential has a higher concentration of solutes (also known as a high solute potential). The partially permeable membrane is selective to particles due to the small size of the pores in the membrane, which is not large enough to allow solutes to pass across it, but is large enough to allow water molecules to pass across.

The process is passive, meaning no energy input is required, as it is a result of the random movement of water molecules in solution. During osmosis, water molecules will move in both directions, but will equilibrate when the water potential on each side is equal, and as a result there will have been a net movement of water down a concentration gradient. At this equilibrium, water molecules will continue to travel across the membrane, but at an equal rate in each direction, so that no further net change occurs.

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What direction do molecules of osmosis move?

Osmosis is not a molecule. It is the flow of water through cell membranes from areas of high concentration to areas of low concentration.

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What is the primary driving force for osmosis?

The concentration of a solution

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How are tattoos and osmosis related?

i would assume they are not because osmosis is only water, tattoo is ink, and whatever the ink is composed of. Diffusion maybe? But then iduno.. diffuses thru a membrane (layers of skin) and that's how it stays permently...

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How are osmosis and diffusion related?

they both use water molecules.

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What is osmosis and its application?

http://www.answers.com/topic/osmosis The applications listed on that website are very informative, but the description of osmosis is lacking a few details. It would be a good idea to supplement your reading of that web page with this information:

It is a common misconception that osmosis is the diffusion of water in only one direction. In reality, water molecules will diffuse in both directions during osmosis, but the rate of diffusion from a region of high water potential (low solute concentration) to a region of low water potential (high solute concentration) will be higher than the rate of diffusion back into the region of high water potential/low solute concentration. Thus osmosis is the net movement of water across a semi-permeable membrane, from a region of high (more positive) water potential to a region of low (more negative) water potential. The word 'net' is very important in this definition, as it illustrates that we are referring to the overall effect, rather than individual molecular movements.

It is also important to remember that osmosis does not stop when "there is an equal solute concentration on both sides of the membrane". Osmosis will 'stop' when the water potential on either side of the membrane is equal, which may occur when one side still has a higher solute concentration, since other factors also effect osmosis (eg pressure). Even when osmosis 'stops', water will still diffuse in both directions, but at equal rates (the system has reached equilibrium).

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Genetics
Osmosis

What do osmosis and diffusion have in common?

they are both examples of passive transport

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Potatoes
Osmosis

What happens to a piece of potato immersed in a distilled water?

The water outside the potato has no electrolytes, the water inside does. The water outside will move into the cells and the cell can get very turgid.

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What impact does osmosis and diffusion have on life?

If osmosis and diffusion didn't exist then cells In things would be dry and shrink

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Chemistry
Osmosis

What is the only substance that undergo osmosis?

It is water. Water can move from a region of high solute concentration to a region of low solute concentrations. Osmosis is a passive process and no energy is required.

There are many things that undergo osmosis. For example- resins, cells etc.

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How do diffusion and osmosis affect cells?

diffusion does the thing and osmosis does the other one. 10/10 gameinformer

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Example Sentences
Osmosis

What is a sentence for the word osmosis?

The water tank used a reverse osmosis filtration system.

Plants use osmosis to obtain water through their roots.

Sleeping on a book will not transfer the knowledge by osmosis.

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Osmosis

How are osmosis and diffusion the same?

they are processes in biology.

yeah.

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Osmosis

What is the difference between osmosis and dialysis?

Dialysis only refers to the transfer of the solute, while the transfer of the solvent is called osmosis.

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Potatoes
Osmosis

What happens during osmosis?

'Osmosis' is a term used to describe the passage of water from a region of high water concentration through a semi-permeable membrane to a region of low water concentration. This is basically done to re establish the equilibrium

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What materials does osmosis transport?

FLUIDS

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