Passover

Passover is a Jewish holiday commemorating their exodus from Egypt as cited in the Old Testament. This category is about the conceptual significance of Passover which is central to the understanding of Judaism.

3,203 Questions
Judaism
Passover

How do Jews celebrate Passover?

Pesach (Passover) is important to us since in it we relive the Exodus from Egypt and our birth as a nation, both of which were preparations for receiving the Torah from God.
The highlight of Passover is the Seder meal. This meal is of great importance in Judaism. It is a 3325-year old continuoustradition that began on the night of the Exodus from Egypt (see Exodus chapter 12), and is fully detailed in our ancient Oral Traditions (Talmud, chapter Arvei Pesachim).
The Seder meal is one of those occasions, like Yom Kippur and Hanukkah, that Jews all over the world, Orthodox and non-Orthodox alike, observe in common. During the Seder, we keep the essential mitzva and customs of handing Jewish traditions down to the next generation, with the traditional Seder foods and the ceremony of reading the Passover Haggadah which retells the events of the Exodus.


During the Seder meal, other traditional foods are eaten in addition to the matzah: bitter herbs, parsley,wine and haroset (see below). Salt water, a roasted egg, and a bit of roasted meat are also on the table.
During all the days of Passover, matzah (unleavened bread) is eaten; while leavened foods such as bread, cake, cookies, cereal and pasta are forbidden. Certain prayers are added in the synagogue services, and the Torah is read each day.
Here is the symbolism of the items on the Seder plate:
The bitter herbs (maror) symbolize the harsh slavery which the Israelites suffered in Egypt. Horseradish and/or romaine lettuce are traditionally used for maror.
Charoset - A sweet mixture representing the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build the storehouses of Egypt. In Ashkenazi Jewish homes, charoset is traditionally made from chopped nuts, grated apples, cinnamon, and sweet red wine.
Karpas - A vegetable other than bitter herbs, traditionally parsley, which is dipped into salt water at the beginning of the Seder. The dipping of a simple herb into salt water (which represents tears) recalls the pain felt by the Israelite slaves in Egypt.
Beitzah - A hard-boiled egg, symbolizing the korban chagigah (festival sacrifice) that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night. Although both the Pesach sacrifice and the chagigah were meat-offerings, the chagigah is commemorated by an egg, a symbol of mourning.
Z'roa - A roasted lamb or goat shank-bone, chicken wing, or chicken neck; symbolizing the korban Pesach (Pesach sacrifice), which was a lamb that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem, then roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night.

See also:

How is the Seder celebrated?

What is the importance of the Israelite Exodus?

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Judaism
Kosher Food
Passover

What does matzoh represent?

It represents the flat bread Jews ate while fleeing from slavery in Egypt.

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Passover
Chips

Can you eat potato chips on Passover?

The label on the bag has to say "Kosher for Passover". Otherwise, chips can't be eaten.

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Judaism
Hanukkah
Passover
Purim
Sukkot

What are Hanukkah Purim Pesach and Sukkot?

These are four Jewish holidays.

Purim takes place on the 14th of Adar which normally falls some time in March or April. This holiday is when we read the book of Esther. It is a joyous holiday where everyone dresses up in costume, people give gifts of cookies, sweets, and fruit, carnivals are held, and adults are supposed to get tipsy.

Pesach takes place on the 15th to 22nd of Nisan, again some time in March or April. This holiday is when we read the story of the Jewish Exodus from Egypt. The first night in Israel and the first 2 nights outside of Israel are observed with a religious service called a 'seder' that is held in the home. No leavened products are eaten during the whole of this holiday.

Sukkot takes place on the 15th to 20th of Tishrei, some time in September or October. This holiday is in remembrance of HaShem's protection during our 40 years in the desert. It's celebrated by constructing a 4 walled temporary shelter outdoors called a 'sukkah', at least 2 of the walls must be temporary and we should be able to see the sky through the roof. At a minimum, all meals should be eaten in the sukkah and where climate permits, people will also sleep in it.

Hanukkah takes place on the 25th of Kislev to the 3rd of Tevet, either the end of November or some time in December. Hanukkah is when we remember our victory over invaders who attempted our forced assimilation and is one of the least of the various holidays. It's celebrated by lighting candles each night of the holiday, starting with one plus a helper and adding an additional candle each night. Traditionally, foods cooked in oil and dairy foods are eating. The best known foods eaten during this holiday are potato latkes (pancakes) and sufganiyot (jam buster doughnuts).

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English to Hebrew
Passover

How do you say happy Passover in Hebrew?

Pesach sameiach פסח שמח

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Judaism
Passover

What does the Passover meal represent?

A celebration of the Exodus.

Pesach (Passover) is important to us since in it we relive the Exodus from Egypt and our birth as a nation, both of which were preparations for receiving the Torah from God.
The highlight of Passover is the Seder meal. This meal is of great importance in Judaism. It is a 3325-year old continuoustradition that began on the night of the Exodus from Egypt (see Exodus chapter 12), and is fully detailed in our ancient Oral Traditions (Talmud, chapter Arvei Pesachim).
The Seder meal is one of those occasions, like Yom Kippur and Hanukkah, that Jews all over the world, Orthodox and non-Orthodox alike, observe in common. During the Seder, we keep the essential mitzva and customs of handing Jewish traditions down to the next generation, with the traditional Seder foods and the ceremony of reading the Passover Haggadah which retells the events of the Exodus.


During the Seder meal, other traditional foods are eaten in addition to the matzah: bitter herbs, parsley, wine and haroset (see below). Salt water, a roasted egg, and a bit of roasted meat are also on the table.
During all the days of Passover, matzah (unleavened bread) is eaten; while leavened foods such as bread, cake, cookies, cereal and pasta are forbidden. Certain prayers are added in the synagogue services, and the Torah is read each day.
Here is the symbolism of the items on the Seder plate:
The bitter herbs (maror) symbolize the harsh slavery which the Israelites suffered in Egypt. Horseradish and/or romaine lettuce are traditionally used for maror.
Charoset - A sweet mixture representing the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build the storehouses of Egypt. In Ashkenazi Jewish homes, charoset is traditionally made from chopped nuts, grated apples, cinnamon, and sweet red wine.
Karpas - A vegetable other than bitter herbs, traditionally parsley, which is dipped into salt water at the beginning of the Seder. The dipping of a simple herb into salt water (which represents tears) recalls the pain felt by the Israelite slaves in Egypt.
Beitzah - A hard-boiled egg, symbolizing the korban chagigah (festival sacrifice) that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night. Although both the Pesach sacrifice and the chagigah were meat-offerings, the chagigah is commemorated by an egg, a symbol of mourning.
Z'roa - A roasted lamb or goat shank-bone, chicken wing, or chicken neck; symbolizing the korban Pesach (Pesach sacrifice), which was a lamb that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem, then roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night.

See also:

How is the Seder celebrated?


What is the importance of the Israelite Exodus?

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Passover
Judaism

When is Passover in 2015?

Outside of Israel, it is Saturday, April 4th - Saturday, April 11th.

In Israel, it is Saturday, April 4th - Friday, April 10th.

259260261
The Bible
Bible Statistics and History
Passover

Where does the holy spirit appear in the bible?

the holy spirit first appears when Jesus is baptized then reappers when all the disiples and Mary are in a room

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Judaism
Kosher Food
Passover

Are greenbeans kosher for Passover?

Green beans are kitniyot so Ashkenazi Jews don't eat them during Passover.

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Judaism
Kosher Food
Passover

Is mustard kosher for Passover?

It depends on the brand. However, even brands of real mustard that are certified kosher for Passover are still kitniyot.

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Passover

How was the lamb killed at Passover?

Passover lambs were slaughtered no different than any animal was slaughtered according to the laws of kashrut. This means that the animal was restrained and the neck slit in one fast movement that severed the arteries resulting in almost instanteous loss of conciousness. The animal would then be hung by its hind legs to drain it of blood before it would have been prepared for eating.

There is no established tradition of hanging animals by their fore limbs.

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Judaism
Passover

What do Jews eat at the Passover?

During the Passover Seder meal, certain traditional foods are eaten in addition to the matzah: bitter herbs, parsley,wine and haroset (see below). Salt water, a roasted egg, and a bit of roasted meat are also on the table.
During all the days of Passover, matzah (unleavened bread) is eaten; while leavened foods such as bread, cake, cookies, cereal and pasta are forbidden. Special prayers are added in the synagogue services, and the Torah is read each day.
Here is the symbolism of the items on the Seder plate:
The bitter herbs (maror) symbolize the harsh slavery which the Israelites suffered in Egypt. Horseradish and/or romaine lettuce are traditionally used for maror.
Charoset - A sweet mixture representing the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build the storehouses of Egypt. In Ashkenazi Jewish homes, charoset is traditionally made from chopped nuts, grated apples, cinnamon, and sweet red wine.
Karpas - A vegetable other than bitter herbs, traditionally parsley, which is dipped into salt water at the beginning of the Seder. The dipping of a simple herb into salt water (which represents tears) recalls the pain felt by the Israelite slaves in Egypt.
Beitzah - A hard-boiled egg, symbolizing the korban chagigah (festival sacrifice) that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night. Although both the Pesach sacrifice and the chagigah were meat-offerings, the chagigah is commemorated by an egg, a symbol of mourning.
Z'roa - A roasted lamb or goat shank-bone, chicken wing, or chicken neck; symbolizing the korban Pesach (Pesach sacrifice), which was a lamb that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem, then roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night.


Pesach (Passover) is important to us since in it we relive the Exodus from Egypt and our birth as a nation, both of which were preparations for receiving the Torah from God.
The highlight of Passover is the Seder meal. This meal is of great importance in Judaism. It is a 3325-year old continuoustradition that began on the night of the Exodus from Egypt (see Exodus chapter 12), and is fully detailed in our ancient Oral Traditions (Talmud, chapter Arvei Pesachim).
The Seder meal is one of those occasions, like Yom Kippur and Hanukkah, that Jews all over the world, Orthodox and non-Orthodox alike, observe in common. During the Seder, we keep the essential mitzva and customs of handing Jewish traditions down to the next generation, with the traditional Seder foods and the ceremony of reading the Passover Haggadah which retells the events of the Exodus.

See also:

How is the Seder celebrated?

What is the importance of the Israelite Exodus?

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Judaism
Tanakh and Talmud
Passover

How do orthodox Jews celebrate Passover?

They do everything by the book.

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Passover
Judaism
Manners and Etiquette

What is the proper greeting for Passover?

Chag Sameach!

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Judaism
Passover

Do you use a menorah at Passover?

No.

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Judaism
Kosher Food
Passover

Is lamb kosher for Passover?

Yes, but it should be labeled as having had Rabbinical supervision for consumption during Passover.

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Judaism
Israel
Passover

Why is Passover celebrated 7 days in Israel and 8 days outside of Israel?

Actually, Passover was established as a 7 day festival. In fact, Passover is still celebrated as a 7 day festival in the land of Israel. However, in the Diaspora, the festival is 8 days. The reason for this is that when the new moon was originally sanctified in Jerusalem, the messengers couldn't get to the Jews living in the diaspora in time in order to let them know when the festival was to begin. As such, Jews in the diaspora kept an extra day because of the doubt. Now, even though there is a fixed calendar, this tradition continues and the festival is 7 days in Israel and 8 days in the diaspora. The first day of Passover (first two in the diaspora) is considered a holy day (Yom Tov). On the first day the Jews left Egypt. The seventh day (and the 8th day in the diaspora) is also considered a holy day. On the seventh day the miracle of splitting the sea occurred. The days in between are the intermediate days of the festival.

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Judaism
Nuts
Kosher Food
Passover

Are almonds kosher for Passover?

Yes, very much so!

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Judaism
Kosher Food
Passover

How were the Israelites to eat the Passover meal?

They were to slaughter a young goat or sheep, drain its blood and place a mark on the doorways of their homes, and roast the meat. All of the meat was to be eaten.

Answer:In haste (Genesis 12:11).
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Judaism
Passover

Is rice kosher for Passover?

Like many things Jewish, it depends. Jews from Europe other than Spain ("Ashkenazim") have a tradition not to eat it since rice flour in particular was commonly stored in the same place that wheat flour was stored, leading to confusion as to what was permitted and what was not permitted and what matzot was made out of, and hence for simplicity was banned.

Jews from Spain ("Sephardim") and the Middle East find rice acceptable tend to eat it, although the custom is to check it three times before using it in any form other than recognizable rice (such as rice flour) as a cooking ingredient to make sure it is not something else that is not permitted.

The Torah instructs a Jew not to eat (or even possess) chometz all seven days of Passover (Exodus 13:3). "Chometz" is defined as any of the five grains (wheat, spelt, barley, oats, and rye) that came into contact with water for more than 18 minutes. This is a serious Torah prohibition, and for that reason we take extra protective measures on Passover to prevent any mistakes.

Which brings us to another category of food called "kitniyot". This includes rice, corn, legumes (soy beans, string beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, etc), mustard, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, and poppy seeds. Even though kitniyot cannot technically become chometz, Ashkenazi Jews do not eat them on Passover. Why?

The Smak (Rabbi Moshe of Kouchi, 13th century, France) explains that products of kitniyot appear like chometz products. For example, it can be hard to distinguish between rice flour (kitniyot) and wheat flour (chometz). Therefore, to prevent confusion, all kitniyot was prohibited.

The Beit Yosef (Rabbi Yosef Karo, 16th century, Israel) notes that grains may become mixed together with kitniyot, and one may inadvertently come to eat actual chometz.

Here's an article that may help explain a bit more, found at Rabbi Simons, "Kosher for Passover", See Related Links for the URL.

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Kosher Food
Passover
Lettuce

Is arugula kosher for Passover?

Arugula is an edible leaf and is kosher year round including Passover.

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Judaism
Tanakh and Talmud
Passover

What happened during the Passover?

In the Exodus, Moses brought the Israelites out of the Egyptian slavery under the guidance of God, after God brought plagues upon the Egyptians (Exodus ch.1-12). See also:


Pesach (Passover) is important to us since in it we relive the Exodus from Egypt and our birth as a nation, both of which were preparations for receiving the Torah from God.
The highlight of Passover is the Seder meal. This meal is of great importance in Judaism. It is a 3325-year old continuoustradition that began on the night of the Exodus from Egypt (see Exodus chapter 12), and is fully detailed in our ancient Oral Traditions (Talmud, chapter Arvei Pesachim).
The Seder meal is one of those occasions, like Yom Kippur and Hanukkah, that Jews all over the world, Orthodox and non-Orthodox alike, observe in common. During the Seder, we keep the essential mitzva and customs of handing Jewish traditions down to the next generation, with the traditional Seder foods and the ceremony of reading the Passover Haggadah which retells the events of the Exodus.


During the Seder meal, other traditional foods are eaten in addition to the matzah: bitter herbs, parsley,wine and haroset (see below). Salt water, a roasted egg, and a bit of roasted meat are also on the table.
During all the days of Passover, matzah (unleavened bread) is eaten; while leavened foods such as bread, cake, cookies, cereal and pasta are forbidden. Certain prayers are added in the synagogue services, and the Torah is read each day.
Here is the symbolism of the items on the Seder plate:
The bitter herbs (maror) symbolize the harsh slavery which the Israelites suffered in Egypt. Horseradish and/or romaine lettuce are traditionally used for maror.
Charoset - A sweet mixture representing the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build the storehouses of Egypt. In Ashkenazi Jewish homes, charoset is traditionally made from chopped nuts, grated apples, cinnamon, and sweet red wine.
Karpas - A vegetable other than bitter herbs, traditionally parsley, which is dipped into salt water at the beginning of the Seder. The dipping of a simple herb into salt water (which represents tears) recalls the pain felt by the Israelite slaves in Egypt.
Beitzah - A hard-boiled egg, symbolizing the korban chagigah (festival sacrifice) that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night. Although both the Pesach sacrifice and the chagigah were meat-offerings, the chagigah is commemorated by an egg, a symbol of mourning.
Z'roa - A roasted lamb or goat shank-bone, chicken wing, or chicken neck; symbolizing the korban Pesach (Pesach sacrifice), which was a lamb that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem, then roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night.

See also:

How is the Seder celebrated?

What is the importance of the Israelite Exodus?

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Judaism
Passover

What is the main theme of Passover?

Gratitude to God for the Exodus from Egypt. Pesach (Passover) is important to us since in it we relive the Exodus from Egypt and our birth as a nation, both of which were preparations for receiving the Torah from God.
The highlight of Passover is the Seder meal. This meal is of great importance in Judaism. It is a 3325-year old continuoustradition that began on the night of the Exodus from Egypt (see Exodus chapter 12), and is fully detailed in our ancient Oral Traditions (Talmud, chapter Arvei Pesachim).
The Seder meal is one of those occasions, like Yom Kippur and Hanukkah, that Jews all over the world, Orthodox and non-Orthodox alike, observe in common. During the Seder, we keep the essential mitzva and customs of handing Jewish traditions down to the next generation, with the traditional Seder foods and the ceremony of reading the Passover Haggadah which retells the events of the Exodus.


During the Seder meal, other traditional foods are eaten in addition to the matzah: bitter herbs, parsley, wine and haroset (see below). Salt water, a roasted egg, and a bit of roasted meat are also on the table.
During all the days of Passover, matzah (unleavened bread) is eaten; while leavened foods such as bread, cake, cookies, cereal and pasta are forbidden. Certain prayers are added in the synagogue services, and the Torah is read each day.
Here is the symbolism of the items on the Seder plate:
The bitter herbs (maror) symbolize the harsh slavery which the Israelites suffered in Egypt. Horseradish and/or romaine lettuce are traditionally used for maror.
Charoset - A sweet mixture representing the mortar used by the Jewish slaves to build the storehouses of Egypt. In Ashkenazi Jewish homes, charoset is traditionally made from chopped nuts, grated apples, cinnamon, and sweet red wine.
Karpas - A vegetable other than bitter herbs, traditionally parsley, which is dipped into salt water at the beginning of the Seder. The dipping of a simple herb into salt water (which represents tears) recalls the pain felt by the Israelite slaves in Egypt.
Beitzah - A hard-boiled egg, symbolizing the korban chagigah (festival sacrifice) that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night. Although both the Pesach sacrifice and the chagigah were meat-offerings, the chagigah is commemorated by an egg, a symbol of mourning.
Z'roa - A roasted lamb or goat shank-bone, chicken wing, or chicken neck; symbolizing the korban Pesach (Pesach sacrifice), which was a lamb that was offered in the Temple in Jerusalem, then roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Seder night.

See also:

How is the Seder celebrated?


What is the importance of the Israelite Exodus?

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Judaism
Kosher Food
Passover
Hot Dogs

Is a hot dog 'Kosher for Passover'?

Only if it is labeled as such.

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Judaism
Kosher Food
Passover

Why are there matzos that are NOT for Passover?

During Pesach (Passover), the ownership and consumption of chametz is strictly prohibited to Jews (Exodus ch.12); so strictly that the penalty for doing so is karet, spiritual excommunication from God.

Chametz is any product made from one of the five grains (wheat, barley, spelt, rye and oats) which has come into contact with water for more than eighteen minutes, which would cause Chimutz (leavening). This includes pasta, bread, cookies, beer and non-Passover matzah, since all of them are in contact with water during manufacture.

To be kosher for Pesach, matzah must be special shmurah ("observed" or "guarded") matzah, which means that the person who made them has kept a careful eye on them before and during baking to ensure that the matzah flour (which itself has been closely guarded against contact with water ever since the grain was harvested) is in contact with water for no more than eighteen minutes before it has finished baking (once baked, the five grains cannot become chametz). The baking is often carried out by chaburas (groups) of Orthodox Jewish men.

This "guarded" method of manufacture is quite a bit more complex than the production of not-for-Pesach matzah; and so, when making matzah for use during the rest of the year, it is less expensive to make the type that are not kosher for Pesach since the Torah-laws against chametz do not apply at other times of the year.

Simply, people like to eat matzah at times that are not Passover and the process to make non-Kosher for Passover Matzot is cheaper.

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