Kosher Food

Kosher food is food that meets Jewish dietary laws. Any food can be called kosher food if it adheres to Jewish law. Foods that are considered Jewish aren't necessarily kosher. Kosher food laws are rather extensive, some are derived from the bible and others through rabbinic interpretations over the years.

Asked in Kosher Food

What is meant by a kosher kitchen?

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Kosher refers to the Jewish rules concerning foods and how or where it is prepared. A kosher kitchen would be a kitchen where these rules are followed. The rules of keeping a kosher kitchen would include keeping dairy plates, pots and utensils separate from those used for eating or cooking meat. Keeping a kosher home, means the same thing. Do not eat dairy products when serving meat. Keep a separate drawer or space for utensils used for meat or dairy. The same is true for keeping separate plates, glasses and utensils in a separate drawer.
Asked in Squid, Kosher Food

Is calamari kosher?

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No. In order for a sea animal to be considered a kosher species, it must have both fins and removable scales (Deuteronomy ch.14), as well as a bony (not cartilaginous) skeleton. Squid has none of those features, hence it is not kosher.
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food, Haddock

Is haddock kosher?

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Haddock is a kosher species of fish.
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food

Are anchovies kosher?

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All fish are kosher except for those that do not have both fins and scales, such as lampreys. Whales and dolphins - which are of course mammals and not fish - are treif (not kosher); as are molluscs and crustaceans such as mussels, whelks, prawns and lobsters. So yes, anchovies are a kosher species of fish.
Asked in Kosher Food

What kosher certification is a circle v?

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Circle V is the Vaad Hoeir of Saint Louis, MO Rabbi Sholom Rivkin
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food, Candy

Is see's candy kosher?

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See the Related Link for a list of their products that have kosher-certification. Being in Israel, I cannot confirm their claim nor dispute it. Sees kosher-certified items
Asked in Judaism, Moose, Kosher Food

Are moose kosher?

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Yes - a moose is a kosher animal. That doesn't mean that any eatery in Alaska offering moose burgers or steaks is automatically kosher. Any mammal that has split hooves and chews its cud (has multiple stomachs) is a kosher animal. If it is slaughtered in a specific process known as Shechita, and the meat is then soaked and salted (to drain the blood away), then the meat is kosher. Moose meat, along with meat of all kosher mammals, may not be eaten together with any dairy products.
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food

A Jew who eats kosher foods follows?

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The kosher dietary laws.
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food, Passover

What does matzoh represent?

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It represents the flat bread Jews ate while fleeing from slavery in Egypt.
Asked in Kosher Food

What does Kosher mean?

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In order to be kosher, food has to be prepared according to the kosher-laws (see Deuteronomy ch.14). These are explained in detail in the Talmud-volume of Chullin. * Meat must be from those land animals which have split hooves and chew their cud (such as beef, venison and mutton). Fish have to have scales and fins. Shellfish are not kosher. Birds cannot be among those listed as forbidden in the Torah (Deuteronomy ch.14) and cannot be hunters/scavengers. In actual practice, today we eat only those species concerning which we have a tradition that they're permitted, such as domestic chicken, geese, pigeons and turkey. * Animals must be slaughtered in the manner specified by Jewish law and must be free of all disease. In actual practice, those who keep kosher purchase meat which is certified as having been prepared in the kosher manner. As much blood as possible must be removed from meat before cooking, since consumption of blood is forbidden (Leviticus ch.17). This is done at home or by the kosher butcher, through salting, soaking and rinsing. * Dairy and meat cannot be combined in the same meal and there's a waiting period between eating one and then the other. After dairy: 1/2 hour. After meat: 6 hours for most Jewish communities. * Fruits and vegetables should be checked to be sure they're free of bugs. Some Jews avoid cauliflower, asparagus, and the like, because of the difficulty in checking them. Additionally, food must be prepared and handled following kashrut-laws and with kosher ingredients only. Processed foods should be labeled as having had kosher supervision during their processing. Any food that does not meet these requirements cannot be eaten by those who are religiously observant Jews. See also the Related Links. Link: Could you give me a list of kosher and non-kosher types of fish? Link: Why do some Jews not keep kosher? Link: The use of rennet
Asked in Kosher Food

Can you freeze matzo ball?

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Yes, you can. The best way to do this is to line the pan with wax or parchment paper then lay out the matzo balls in a single layer. Once they're completely frozen you can put them in a freezer bag to keep.
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food

Do Conservative Jews keep kosher?

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Not all. Why not? Every religion has its non-observant members.1) Non-observant Jews may be under peer influence. In high school, for example, the one student in a class who brought a kosher lunch may be subject to ridicule. This may have led him/her to become slack. 2) Convenience; desires. No one wants "bothersome" rules, or limitations to their personal pleasure. 3a) Lack of proper information. People have inaccurate notions about their religion. They've picked up tidbits, jokes, and "sound-bites," and on such solid authority they dismiss the entire topic. 3b) Lack of Jewish education. 4) Unfortunate experiences. Someone who had a harsh religious upbringing or parent, may retain an unhappy feeling towards Judaism. 5) Many think that science, and specifically Evolution, have proved that there is no need for religion. 6) Intellectual laziness. Many people have simply never delved into the subject, to see if the truth and/or value of the Torah can be convincingly demonstrated. See also: How do you keep kosher?
Asked in Kosher Food, Dairy Products

What does kosher dairy mean?

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'Kosher dairy' means that the food product in question is kosher and contains dairy or dairy byproducts.
Asked in Kosher Food, Breads

Is Sara lee bread kosher?

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Some Sara Lee bread products are certified kosher, you would have to check the packaging to confirm individual items are kosher.
Asked in Kosher Food, Judaism

Can Jewish people eat eggs with milk?

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Yes, eggs are considered 'pareve' which means they are neutral and can be combined with dairy products.
Asked in Kosher Food, Malta

Is there kosher food in Malta?

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There does appear to be kosher food available in Malta. Please see the related links for details. There is only one place that prepared kosher meals ansd kosher food: contact Yigal Maidani on 0035699626200 e-mail ehad.ans.el8@gmail.com
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food

What foods are Jews allowed or not allowed to eat?

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"Kashrut" refers to the Jewish dietary laws. There are many kosher laws. Here are a few highlights: Meat must be from those land animals which have split hooves and chew their cud (such as beef, venison and mutton). Fish have to have scales and fins. Shellfish are not kosher. Birds cannot be among those listed as forbidden in the Torah (Deuteronomy ch.14) and cannot be hunters/scavengers. In actual practice, today we eat only those species concerning which we have a tradition that they're permitted, such as domestic chicken, geese, pigeons and turkey. Animals must be slaughtered in the manner specified by Jewish law and must be free of all disease. In actual practice, those who keep kosher purchase meat which is certified as having been prepared in the kosher manner. As much blood as possible must be removed from meat before cooking, since consumption of blood is forbidden (Leviticus ch.17). This is done at home or by the kosher butcher, through salting, soaking and rinsing. Dairy and meat cannot be combined in the same meal and there's a waiting period between eating one and the other. After dairy: 1/2 hour. After meat: 6 hours for most Jewish communities. Fruits and vegetables should be checked to be sure they're free of bugs. Some Jews avoid cauliflower, asparagus, and the like, because of the difficulty in checking them. In addition, there are rabbinic laws governing the production and consumption of all foods such as milk, bread, wine, cheese and other cooked and raw foods that they must be prepared/cooked or have their preparation/cooking supervised by a religious Jew. Most prepared foods must carry certification that their production is supervised, so as to ensure that they comply with these rules. Kashrut certification is generally indicated by an identifiable symbol, in addition to the word dairy or pareve, which means the food is neither dairy nor meat, but rather neutral. (If a package has just the letter 'K' on it, this is not a valid kashrut symbol as the letter K cannot be trademarked.) Although dairy and meat cannot be served together, fish may be eaten with dairy. This gives rise to the popular and kosher bagel, lox, and cream cheese combination. All fruits and vegetables are kosher. Meat and dairy dishes and utensils can't be washed together. Kosher kitchens must maintain two sets of utensils, pots, pans, and dishes. Contrary to popular misconception, rabbis or other religious officials do not "bless" food to make it kosher. There are blessings that observant Jews recite over food before and after eating, but these blessings have nothing to do with making the food kosher. Food can be kosher without a rabbi ever becoming involved with it: the vegetables from your garden are undoubtedly kosher (as long as they don't have any bugs, which are not kosher.)
Asked in Kosher Food

Where do the Jewish food laws come from?

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The core rules that Jewish dietary laws are based on are found in the Torah. The actual dietary laws, called 'kashrut', are found in the Talmud.
Asked in Kosher Food

What does being kosher?

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The literal meaning of kosher is 'fit'. When kosher is used in reference to food, it means that the food was prepared following the laws of 'kashrut' and is fit to be eaten by religious Jews.
Asked in Kosher Food

What kosher certification is BCK?

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BCK is an orthodox Jewish organization based in British Columbia, Canada that certifies kosher food production and restaurants.
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food, Passover

Are greenbeans kosher for Passover?

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Green beans are kitniyot so Ashkenazi Jews don't eat them during Passover.
Asked in Food & Cooking, Judaism, Kosher Food

Is whey kosher?

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Whey is a dairy product, made from milk and can be kosher. As this is a processed food product, it would require kosher certification to be considered kosher.
Asked in Judaism, Kosher Food, Passover

Is mustard kosher for Passover?

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It depends on the brand. However, even brands of real mustard that are certified kosher for Passover are still kitniyot.