Saint Patrick's Day

St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of Christianity's most widely known figures. But for all his celebrity, his life remains somewhat of a mystery. Ask any questions here about celebrating St. Patrick's Day.

Asked in Saint Patrick's Day, Philosophy and Philosophers

Where do you find a four-leaf clover?

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You should be able to find it at any grass field.. if you want to buy it.. there is a place online...
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Where are the largest Saint Patrick's Day parades?

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The New York parade has become the largest Saint Patrick's Day parade in the world. In a typical year, 150,000 marchers participate in it, including bands, firefighters, military and police groups, county associations, emigrant societies, and social and cultural clubs, and 2 million spectators line the streets. Boston, the nations oldest parade, also hosts about 3-400,000 or more people each year, and has one of the biggest and best party atmospheres in America's "most Irish neighborhood." Savannah, GA, boasts the unofficial largest attendance with 750,000 people in attendance in 2006. Due to the rich history of Scranton participation in St. Patrick's Day festivities, it is one of the oldest and most populated parades in the United States. Scranton hosts the third largest St. Patrick's Day Parade in the United States.
Asked in Catholicism, Saint Patrick's Day

From where did St. Patrick's Day originate?

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St. Patrick's Day originated in Ireland. This is surprising considering he was born in Britain, but he also preached in Ireland. The present day form of it is largely American.
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When did Americans start celebrating St. Patrick's Day?

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St. Patrick's day was first celebrated in the U.S. in Boston in 1737. It was and is a Catholic Holy Day. According to legend, St. Patrick lead all of the snakes out of Ireland. A day was created in honor of this supposed feat.
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day, Saints

How did St. Patrick use the shamrock in his teachings?

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He used the shamrock to teach the Trinity- one leaf, three parts, one God, three persons.
Asked in History of Ireland, Saint Patrick's Day, Dublin

What is the proper meal to celebrate St Patrick's Day?

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Corned beef and cabbage is the traditional Irish and Irish-American fare on St. Patrick's Day. Many will also tell you that beer has to be a part of that as well.
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What happens if you don't wear green on St. Patrick's Day?

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If you are not wearing green you can be pinched by someone who is.
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Where was the first St. Patrick's Day parade?

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The celebration of St. Patrick's Day was imported to America and other countries by nostalgic Irish immigrants in an attempt to inspire unity, assert a presence, and to celebrate their cultural integration. After Irish immigrants found their way to America, the colonies celebrated St. Patrick's Day for the first time in Boston in 1737. In New York City, the earliest celebration was reportedly held in 1756 at the Crown and Thistle Tavern. Parades were not initially included in the activities.The first St. Patrick's Day parade was in New York City on March 17, 1762, when Irish soldiers serving in the English military marched through the streets accompanied by highland bagpipes, ancient instruments capable of emitting a haunting wail (used by Celtic soldiers to intimidate enemies).
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day, Ireland

If St Patrick was a Christian out to convert the pagans of Ireland why do most Americans today celebrate the holiday by getting drunk?

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Because that's what America seems to do with most holidays. Memorial Day, Labor Day, 4th of July, New Years, etc. However, due to great Irish beer, it just makes sense to celebrate with a frosty one. Have you ever met an Irishman who didn't like beer? Also, the holiday has become a day of celebration, focusing not only on St. Patrick but the plight of the Irishmen, and a day to honor Ireland. As a side note, there are more Irish-Americans in the US than there are Irish countrymen in Ireland, due to the throngs of immigrants that came to the US: the United States saw nearly 3.5 million Irish immigrants come to her shores seeking a new life. See the related link from more information. Our ancestors had it really rough when they got here, as I'm sure you may know. So there is great pride in that Irish ancestry. While yes, some may pose, many of us like to celebrate our heritage/background - and we'll celebrate with people of every descent, Irish or not, especially if you buy us a beer. I second that - either that or they think if they drink beer like the Irish, they are celebrating with them!! Because Irish made beer and St. Patricks day is the only Irish holiday for Americans. Because during LENT Catholics were obligated to abstain from a great many pleasures including drinking. But on Saint Patricks day the church absolves us of this burden resulting in excessive drinking and leads to much mayhem s well.
Asked in History of Ireland, Saint Patrick's Day, Ireland

Which countries celebrate Saint Patrick's Day?

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The Irish people went to many places around the world. The United States, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, England and other places celebrate St. Patrick's Day. Chicago dyes the Chicago River green. New York and Chicago both have parades.
Asked in History of Ireland, Saint Patrick's Day, Superstitions

What does kissing the Blarney Stone mean?

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Kissing the blarney stone gives you the "gift of the gab". You'll supposedly be very talkative, and spreading "blarney" (or BS). The tradition of kissing the Blarney Stone is said to bestow eloquence on the kisser. To be able to kiss the stone you have to dangle yourself from a position from which, if you fell, you would meet your demise. http://www.sacredsites.com/europe/ireland/blarney_stone.html
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day, Ireland, Leprechauns

Who wears green in Ireland and why?

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Ireland has long considered green to be it's national colour. Irish football teams wear green, and people around the world wear green on St. Patrick's day. Rural Ireland has a green landscape (fields, trees, etc) and when many Irish poets fell upon harded times in cities abroad they would lament over the "Emerald Isle". St. Patrick used a shamrock to introduce Christianity to Ireland (each leaf representing one part of the Holy Trinity). Also, green was the colour of sympathy for independence in the late 18th Century when Ireland was still struggling for independence from Britain - so much so the Britain actually banned the "wearing of the green" around that time. On St. Patrick's day it is common for people in Ireland and abroad (especially those with Irish ancestors) to wear green - either a piece of Shamrock or a green item of clothing. For the past 31 years on Saint Patrick's day, New York's Fire Fighters also wore green berets instead of their usual blue caps. The berets date back to 1970, when the mother-in-law of a Bronx firefighter knitted dozens of the caps for St. Patrick's Day. 2005 was the first year the tradition was banned, as officials decided the firefighters should wear their proper uniform with the blue caps. The firefighters responded by wearing civilian clothes and their green berets instead of their uniform! Ironically, according to the Irish cultural group New York's Ancient Order of Hibernians, Peter Durkee, "When Ireland got its freedom
Asked in History of Ireland, Saint Patrick's Day, Definitions

What is the meaning of being pinched if you don't wear green?

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It's pretty much a U.S. custom for St. Patricks day. In Ireland, the protestants and catholics are so displeased with each other that they have actually been fighting a war for many years. We should not take sides nor should we believe that we understand the issues. Catholics wear green on St. Patricks day to commmemorate their religion. On the other hand, the protestants wear orange as a statement against Catholicism. The pinching is little more than a statement against anyone who was not openly and proudly Catholic.
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Who celebrates Saint Patrick's Day?

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Saint Patrick's Day Celebrations Our users share with us: Most people in the US with kids and people in Ireland. Everyone in Canada (generally)
Asked in History of Ireland, Saint Patrick's Day, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

What does 'Top of the morning' mean?

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It is another way to say "good morning," often associated with the Irish. When you wish someone the "Top of the Morning," you are wishing them the best part of the morning. To which they should reply, "and the balance of the day to you." This is wishing you a good rest of the day.
Asked in History of Ireland, Saint Patrick's Day, Leprechauns

What is the meaning behind the pot of gold in Irish tradition?

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It's Irish Folklore and it has it that if you follow the rainbow the "little ones" will leave a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. These little guys were rascals and always playing tricks, so I wouldn't count on that pot 'o gold at the end of any rainbow. Marcy Answer Leprechauns made their gold from being shoemakers and because they danced so much they were always in need to repair shoes. It has absoloutely nothing to do with Irish folklore, and, like Lucky Charms, is a purely American invention. Answer The Irish scientist had a good understanding of the prism and like a lot of sayings of old the term "pot of gold at the end of a rainbow" is a shortened version of the original saying. What was originally said is "you are more likely to find a pot of gold than the end of a rainbow."
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day, Ireland, Grammatical Tenses, Leprechauns

What is a clurichuan and can they also be shoemakers?

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Clurichauns are inherently Irish no matter where they're from, and always wear green. They have a knack of getting along with people, but also at getting away when there's trouble. They are very emotional and are frequently moved to tears or fisticuffs. Clurichauns don't really have pots of gold. Clurichauns and leprechauns are the same thing by 2 different names. Clurichauns like to sing, though not always well, and drink .... a lot! They are tird to the spirit of the land and people of Ireland: it defines their identity as a Kith and they are bound by the Dreaming go protect it. They spread out from Ireland even early and early Clurichauns in England were called "buttery spirits" (among other Kithain who were called the same.) They frequently live in old-fashioned pubs and inns, where they aid good proprietors and wreak mischief for bad ones. CLURICHAUNS ARE TRADITIONALLY SHOEMAKERS FOR THE FAE, BUT NEVER CARRY MORE THAN ONE SHOE AT A TIME SO THEY AREN'T SLOWED DOWN IN ESCAPES. The often carry snuff boxes not only for pipe smoking, but to aid in escapes by making their would-be captors blink and sneeze. They are considered Gallain by many Kithain, but the reasons are unclear. Clurichauns secretly refer to themselves as the Daoine Sidhe, a name they received from their mortal kin during the Sundering, and know their Kith to have once been very similar in the Sidhe before the Sundering. Clurichaun history links them to a hero named Mil, supposedly from Spain, who led them in conquest of Ireland against the Tuatha De Danaan in the early Sundering and they would secretly call themselves House Mil, or the sons of Mil. Then the Sons of Mil conquered Ireland, they drove the defeated Tuatha De Danaan underground into the raths and burghs and asserted their own rule above, only later retreating to the raths and burghs themselves during the later Sundering once the Sidhe had fled to Arcadia. The tradition Clurichaun courts of Hoouse Mil with their own kings lasted until the end of the Irish royal line in the 12th century, when the English conquered Ireland. The magic that binds the Clurichauns to Ireland consists of a prophecy given to the sons of Mil linked with the grace of the Tuatha goddess Eriu. When the Shattering came, Clurichauns as a whole stuck it out in Ireland, not retreating to Arcadia. They once ruled over the Piskies and their Pictish kin in Scotland, but it ended badly enough that Clurichauns resent Piskies to this day.
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day

What do people do to celebrate Saint Patrick's Day?

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People go to Ireland. Many people drink green beer; also eat corned-beef, potatoes, and cabbage. Many people will wear something green, and/or wear shamrocks. You don't have to be Irish to enjoy St. Patrick's Day, the green-themed holiday known for its celebration of Irish culture and myth. From parties to parades, there are many ways people of all different ethnicities can be Irish for the day and enjoy a good time on St. Patrick's Day. Here are some ways you can celebrate. Make it green. Whether you are celebrating at home with your kids, at the office, or at your favorite pub with friends, adding green to the day can make St. Patrick's Day a little more festive than the average weekday. Wearing green, drinking green beer or milk shakes, dyeing food green, and putting up whatever kind of green decorations you can find at the local store are common but effective ways to celebrate St. Patrick's Day. Some people also dye their hair green, get temporary tattoos with shamrocks or dress up in other ways almost as it is a green-themed Halloween. Just make sure that hair dye is temporary! Check out local events. St. Patrick's Day is a popular day for local events. Whether it is a party at your favorite bar, live Irish music, or a huge, family-friendly parade, there's always something going on come March 17, at least in major cities. Check your local paper for events of interest around you and stop by for some St. Patrick's Day festivities thrown for anyone who wants to enjoy them. You can also check out this kind of funny website, St-Patrick's-Day. Have a party. You can always throw your own St. Patrick's Day party. Decorate in green, has plenty of music: Chieftains, U2, Sinead O'Connor, and the Corrs, whatever your taste, plus throw in all the other usual party stuff and invite friends to celebrate with you. You can also serve traditional Irish food, though I would not suggest it, but that is just personal taste. However, if you are interested, find some recipes here: Delve into tradition. If you are proud of your Irish heritage or want to be Irish for the day, look into some St. Patrick trivia on this special day. You can learn about your own ethnic background (or someone else's...) by discovering who St. Patrick was and why anyone cares. You can learn about how the saint's day is celebrated in the U.S as compared to how it is celebrated in Ireland. You can even learn about leprechauns if you want. Start here. Host an Irish film festival. Rent some Irish-themed DVDs or movies starring Irish actors and veg out for the night with some green-dyed popcorn. Some famous Irish actors: Liam Neeson, Pierce Brosnan, Colin Farrell and Fionnula Flanagan (mysterious jeweler from Lost...). Some famous Irish movies? "The Quiet Man," "The Secret of Roan Inish," "Waking Ned Divine," "The Commitments," and "Leprechaun." Okay, maybe that is not exactly Irish as much as just a horrible B-movie, but it could be fun to watch. Prank people with rubber snakes. Part of the St. Patrick's legend is that he drove a plague of snakes out of Ireland. A lesser-known St. Patrick's Day traditional game relates to this aspect of the man. The rules of the game are simple: See how many people you can spook in one day with a rubber snake (which you can buy at places like NaturePavilion). Play in competition with other people and decide on a prize for the winner. Note: when I say this is a "lesser known tradition," I mean I just made it up today. Nevertheless, I am so doing it this year. Have a designated driver. Few holidays, except maybe New Year's Eve, are as associated with drinking as St. Patrick's Day. If you do go out with some friends and the Irish whiskey and green beer starts flowing, make sure there is a designated driver. A celebration that includes drunk driving could end up being anything but fun. St. Patrick's Day is a fun, colorful, upbeat holiday that people celebrate all over the world. From the biggest parade in New York City to the celebration in the tiniest small-town pub, there is plenty of fun to be had by the Irish and Irish-for-a-day. St. Patrick's Day can be whatever you make it, and it can be one of the most fun days of the year. Moreover, that's no blarney.
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day, Food Spoilage, Ingredient Substitutions, Beef and Veal

What part of the animal is corned beef from and where?

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Corned beef is form the brisket of the cow which is the lower stomach it is usually made in Germany. Where it is made will depend on your location. The U.S. will not import beef from Europe. The U.S. has it's own corned beef processors.
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day, Symbolism and Symbolic Meanings, Superstitions, Tom Hanks

Why is a four-leaf clover considered to be good luck?

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Because most clover have only three leaves not four, so it takes a bit of luck to find a four leaf bit of clover in a field. The Irish have a tradition that says if someone finds one by accident they will have good luck. Only 1 in 10,000 have 4 leaves. They stand for: Faith, Hope, Love, and Luck. When Eve left the Garden of Eden, some people say she was holding a four-leaf clover. The green hills of Ireland have more four-leaf clovers than anywhere else, or so the Irish say. From that comes the saying, "luck of the Irish." St. Patrick used a shamrock (one that has three leaves) to represent the holy trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). Some Christians see the four-leaf clover as a resemblance to the cross and some also say that the fourth leaf is the grace of God. The Irish believe that finding a four-leaf clover is LUCKY but finding one with 5 or more is UNLUCKY. Druids believed that when they carried a shamrock that they could see evil spirits coming so they could get away before they came and they thought that four-leaf clovers guarded against bad luck and offered magical protection.
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day, Plants and Flowers

What are the odds of finding a four-leaf clover?

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The odds of finding a four-leaf clover are 1/10,000 or 0.01% on your first try.
Asked in Saint Patrick's Day

Why do people celebrate St. Patrick's Day in the U.S.A.?

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Many Roman Catholics have immigrated to the US over the years, and most likely they brought the holiday with them, and it just grew in popularity till it became a general US holiday, just as Christmas did, which was also originally a Roman Catholic holiday.
Asked in History of Ireland, Saint Patrick's Day, Ireland

What do you get if you kiss the Blarney Stone?

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To kiss the Blarney Stone you must lie on your back and bend your head backwards over a huge gap, and look backwards over the ground below. Even though the castle is in partial ruins the Blarney Stone remains. They say that kissing the Blarney Stone will give you the gift of eloquence, gift of gab (eloquence, the gift to speak in a persuasive manner). It is said you also get receive the gift of Persuasion.