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Plessy v. Ferguson

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Parent Category: US Supreme Court
Plessy v. Ferguson was a US Supreme Court case passed in 1896. It created segregation of races in public locations. This ruling remained in effect until 1954, when Brown v. Board of Education allowed children to be integrated back into the same schools again.
It constitutionaliszed the "Seprate, but Equal" doctrine.
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Plessy v. Ferguson was an 1896 decision by the US Supreme Court that confirmed the principle of "Separate but Equal" and minority segregation. The case began in Louisiana in 1892. Homer Plessy agreed to be arrested to test the 1890 law establishing "whites only" train cars. Although he himself was …
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The effect of Plessy v. Fergusson was that it was lawful for government, common carriers, and places of public accommodation to discriminate against people in the provision of goods and services and rights based upon the color of their skin as long as they were provided "separate but equal" accommod…
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In 1890 Louisiana passed a law that required separate accommodations for Blacks and Whites on the trains. It did require that the accommodations be "Equal". A group of concerned white and black citizens hired a detective and had Homer Plessy board a "White Only" railroad car. Plessy was a very ligh…
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It legalized separate but equal.
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The Plessy v. Ferguson case of 1896 is significant in the course of American history, as it's outcome upheld the notion that racial segregation was constitutionally legal under the "separate but equal" doctrine. The Court held segregation was constitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment Equal Prot…
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In the civil rights case of Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), the US Supreme Court upheld the policy of racial segregation, supporting the "separate but equal" laws. The lower court ruling on segregated public transportation was upheld 7-1, and the precedent held until overruled in 1954 by a ruling on Bro…
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Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) declared state segregation laws constitutional, as long as African-Americans were provided "separate but equal" facilities. Plessy represented a continued erosion of the Fourteenth Amendment by allowing Jim Crow laws to flourish, particularly in the South. These laws permi…
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1898. your welcome
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The Supreme Court decided "separate but equal" (i.e., segregation) was constitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment, as long as the facilities or accommodations were equal. More Information In Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896), the U.S. Supreme Court decided that a Louisiana law, The Separate Car Act of 1…
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The Supreme Court case of Plessy Versus Ferguson was extremely important. It declared that the doctrine of 'separate but equal' was constitutional. This upheld government sanctioned racism in America.
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The Supreme Court decided that "separate but equal" was constitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment and that they would go with it as long as the facilities and accommodations were equal.
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Under the 1986 ruling, the law establishing "separate but equal" was ruled constitutional, and segregation continued in public accommodations and transportation. Plessy v. Ferguson was later reversed in the case of Brown v. Board of Education (1954).It allowed segregation and the "seperate but equ…
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The twenty-fourth President, Grover Cleveland (1893-1897).
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Plessy vs. Ferguson was a Supreme Court case which stated that racial segregation was constitutional. According to this ruling, they were "separate but equal".
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Plessy v. Ferguson is a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision from 1896. It established the doctrine of separate but equal.
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It legalized separate but equal.
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i think it led to the civil rights act...novanet i think...=^.^=
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Yes, it made it legal to segregate "blacks" and "whites" in public places (restrooms, waterfountains, food lines, bus seats, taverns, theatres, waiting rooms, etc.)
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Plessy v. Ferguson originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, when a group of African-American professionals, the Citizens' Committee of New Orleans, decided to challenge the constitutionality of segregation laws. In this case, Homer Plessy deliberately violated the Louisiana Separate Car Act of 1890 (Ac…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) John Howard Ferguson was the judge in Orleans Parish, Louisiana, who heard the case of Homer A. Plessy under the Separate Car Act of 1890. Judge Ferguson had previously ruled that the act did not apply to interstate travel. Because he was named in the petition t…
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It doesn't. It was overturned by Brown vs. Board of Education in 1954.
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Jim Crow laws, which involved segregation and other violations of African-Americans' civil rights.
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) The conflict was initiated by Homer Plessy's arrest in New Orleans, Louisiana, on June 7, 1892, and ended with the US Supreme Court's decision on May 18, 1896, nearly four years later.
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)Chief Justice Melville Fuller Associate Justices Stephen J. Field John M. Harlan (dissented) Horace Gray David J. Brewer (did not participate) Henry Brown George Shiras, Jr. Edward D. White Rufus W. Peckham Vote 7-1, Justice Harlan had the sole dissenting…
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The "Separate but Equal" doctrine was enacted this meant that public places were still segregated however the had equal qualityFor example: There is a School for white children and a school for African American Children. they separate but they have the same books and materials.if you don't understan…
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The decision in the US Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) sanctioned decades of segregation and Jim Crow laws designed to enforce segregation. The South was the worst offender in terms of violating African-Americans' civil rights, but segregation and discrimination were nationwide problem…
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The Brown vs. Board of Education case overturned the Plessy vs. Ferguson case.
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The existing laws allowing "separate but equal" public accommodations were unchallenged, although the system of segregation by race was inherently unjust and unequal. The emancipation of the Civil War had not immediately bestowed full citizenship to slaves, instead being replaced with another system…
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The decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) allowed new segregation laws to flourish, particularly in the Southern States. These statutes and policies, which seldom attempted to incorporate any semblance of "equal" into the "separate but equal" doctrine, became known as Jim Crow laws. The term "Jim …
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) The case was presented to the US Supreme Court in 1896. The sitting members of the court were Chief Justice Melville Fuller and Associate Justices Stephen J. Field, John M. Harlan, Horace Gray, David J. Brewer, Henry B. Brown, George Shiras, Jr., Edward D. White…
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whether separate but equal facilities were constitutional
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) Pass segregationist, or Jim Crow, laws.
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Jim Crow laws
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896), was the landmark US Supreme Court case that legalized discrimination against African-Americans and gave credence to the "separate but equal" doctrine. Plessy, and the Jim Crow laws that flourished in the South due to the Supreme Co…
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Homer A. Plessy was citizen of New Orleans whose heritage was part African-American. He helped challenge and was arrested for violating the Louisiana Separate Car Act of 1890 that required separate railroad cars for white and non-white travelers. Case Citation:Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) F…
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The landmark case that desegregated schools was Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, a 1954 case in which the Supreme Court Justices unanimously ruled segregation in the public schools was unconstitutional. Chief Justice Earl Warren, in writing the Court opinion, declared "separate but equal is in…
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In 1896, Homer Plessy was recruited by an African American civil rights activist group with the intent of challenging the constitutionality of the Louisiana Separate Car Act (Act 111). As a man of one-eighth African descent, Plessy could manage to purchase a first class ticket while also remain in d…
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racial segregation was permitted for nearly 60 years
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) The defendant (actually respondent), John Howard Ferguson, was the judge in Orleans Parish, Louisiana, who heard the case of Homer A. Plessy under the Separate Car Act of 1890. Judge Ferguson had previously ruled that the act did not apply to interstate travel. …
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Segregation
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) Chief Justice Melville Fuller presided over the US Supreme Court from 1888 until 1910. Fuller was responsible for many of the decisions that dismantled African-Americans' budding civil rights in the post-Reconstruction era. He is probably best remembered for the…
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No. Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) established the "separate but equal" doctrine when the US Supreme Court upheld a Louisiana law requiring African-American and white travelers to ride in separate train cars. The US Supreme Court overturned the ruling in Plessy in Brown v Board of Education, 347 U.S. 4…
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It established that separate but equal facilities for different races were not acting against the law in anyway.
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In a case citation, either abbreviation of versus, v. or vs., is correct, but v. is used more frequently. The single letter, V, is sometimes capitalized, but this looks odd to my eye.
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The decision of Brown v. Board of Education, (1954) declared the previous ruling of Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) unconstitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment Equal Protection Clause. Using a Brandeis Brief, in which "social fact" is presented as evidence, it was shown that "Separate but Equal" seg…
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The decision allowed segregated facilities throughout the United States, and established the constitutionality of laws that established segregation. It was overturned in 1954 by Brown v Board of Education of Topeka, which had the effect of making all US segregation laws inherently unconstitutional. …
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Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) established the "separate but equal" doctrine that allowed Jim Crow segregation laws to flourish throughout the United States. This doctrine was held to be unconstitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment in Brown v. Board of Education, (1954).
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Because the African Americans did not win the court case, it showed that they still did not have much power in society at the time, which was unfair. They were still being separated from whites, and even when they tried to stand up for themselves, they could not have justice.
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No, just the opposite. Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) validated the practice of segregation and provided a foundation for the expansion of racist Jim Crow laws. Brown v. Board of Education, (1954) overturned Plessy, holding that "separate but equal" is unconstitutional.
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) The Supreme Court held that states had the right to create separate but equal accommodations in intrastate (within the state) transportation and other public facilities as long as there was a legitimate reason for creating the statute. In Plessy, the Court cited…
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The question before the Supreme Court was whether Louisiana's 1890 Separate Car Act (Act 111), that required racial segregation in railroad travel, was constitutional under the 13th and 14th Amendments. Specifically: "Is Louisiana's law mandating racial segregation on its trains an unconstitutional…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) The case was argued before the US Supreme Court on April 13, 1896 and decided on May 18, 1896.
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because blacks and whites had to ride different rail carts
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It upheld the "separate but equal" doctrine.
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it ruled infavor of segregation as long as facilities were equal
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Homer Plessy lost. The US Supreme Court upheld Judge Ferguson's ruling and validated the Louisiana Separate Car Act of 1890, paving the way for segregationist Jim Crow laws and other civil rights violations against African-Americans. The "separate but equal" doctrine established in Plessy v. Fergus…
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The East Louisiana Railroad Conductor who punched Homer Plessy's ticket asked if he was "white or colored." Plessy responded that he was "colored," but refused to move to the car designated for African-American travelers. Plessy was a member of the New Orleans' Citizens' Committee that organized c…
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No. Public schools were already segregated in many parts of the United States prior to the Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) case. The Supreme Court decision in Plessy validated the "separate but equal" doctrine, and lead to the entrenchment of Jim Crow laws that discriminated against African-Americans. Br…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)Plessy was a landmark case because it explicitly authorized the practice of segregation that had been in effect since before emancipation was completed in July 1865. Although we symbolically mark the period when Plessy was in effect as beginning in 1896 and endin…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)Chief Justice Melville Fuller Associate Justices Stephen J. Field John M. Harlan (dissented) Horace Gray David J. Brewer (did not participate) Henry Brown George Shiras, Jr. Edward D. White Rufus W. Peckham Vote 7-1, Justice Harlan had the sole dissenting…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) Plessy vs. Ferguson (1896): The Supreme Court ruled that it was constitutional for different races to be separated in different areas, as long as the facilities were considered equal.
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The decision in the US Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) affirmed the "separate but equal" doctrine that promoted segregation, various forms of legalized discrimination (such as Jim Crow laws), and indirectly sanctioned hatred and racism.
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Plessy v. Ferguson said that it was okay for public facilities to be separate for different races, as long as they were equal. This decision set the stage for further racial segregation. It was eventually overturned in Brown v. Board of Education. That decision noted that separate is inherently uneq…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) Justice John Marshall Harlan
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He draped himself
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Justice Henry Billings Brown wrote the majority opinion for Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896). Justice John Marshall Harlan wrote the only dissent. Case Citation:Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)Answer The Plessy decision was largely based on a combination of rationalization and precedent established by earlier Supreme Court cases addressing the interpretation and application of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments, such as The Slaughter-House Cases,…
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The decision said that it was alright to segregate as long as there were equal accommodations and facilities for all the races. In other words, "separate but equal".
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it legalized separate but equal
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Homer A. Plessy (petitioner) was citizen of New Orleans whose heritage was part African-American. He helped challenge and was arrested for violating the Louisiana Separate Car Act of 1890 that required separate railroad cars for white and non-white travelers. John Howard Ferguson (respondent) was th…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896), was the landmark US Supreme Court case that legalized discrimination against African-Americans and gave credence to the "separate but equal" doctrine. In 1890, the Louisiana State Legislature passed the Separate Car Act (Act 111), which enforced "separate but equal" trav…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)Majority for Ferguson (Defendant/Respondent) Melville Fuller Stephen J. Field Horace Gray Henry Brown George Shiras, Jr. Edward D. White Rufus W. Peckham Dissent John M. Harlan I Vote 7-1, Justice Harlan had the sole dissenting opinion; David J. Brewer too…
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Brown VS. Board of education
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The Plessy vs. Ferguson case was all about segregation. Without segregation, the plot of To Kill A Mockingbird would be different. Also, Atticus is getting talked about badly in Maycomb for defending Tom Robinson.
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Homer A. Plessy was the plaintiff/petitioner and John H. Ferguson was the defendant/respondent in the US Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896). Homer Plessy was citizen of New Orleans whose heritage was part African-American. He helped challenge and was arrested for violating the Louisiana …
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No. Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) sanctioned racial segregation by declaring "separate but equal" facilities constitutional. Miranda v. Arizona, (1965) requires police to notify suspects of their rights.
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)Answer The conflict was initiated by Homer Plessy's arrest in New Orleans, Louisiana, on June 7, 1892, and ended with the US Supreme Court's decision on May 18, 1896, nearly four years later.Explanation Plessy v. Ferguson originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, whe…
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It upheld the "separate but equal" doctrine.
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)Both. Plessy v. Ferguson began in Louisiana state courts because it involved violation of the Louisiana Separate Car Act of 1890 (Act 111); however, the case was appealed to the US Supreme Court on a federal question challenging the constitutionality of the state…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) For the Petitioner: Homer Plessy Albion W. Tourgée and Samuel F. Phillips argued the Plessy's case before the Court. James C. Walker, a Louisiana attorney, represented Homer Plessy as local counsel, along with famed New York civil rights attorney and former ju…
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896)John Marshall Harlan dissented from the Court's opinion in the case and correctly predicted the long-term impact of the Court's decision.
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He sued him because he was the owner of the streetcar that Homer was arrested on for sitting in the "whites only" street car.
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In the case of Plessy v Ferguson, the supreme court ruled that segregation under the "seperate but equal" clause was constitutional, but in the case of Brown v the Board of Education, the supreme court ruled that under the 14th amendment, segregation was unconstitutional.
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You could just try this resource:Plessy v. Ferguson Primary source document outlining the Supreme Court's decision and a dissenting opinion. See the related link.
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Which of these statements accurately describes the Plessy v. Ferguson Supreme Court decision of 1896?
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) The phrase "separate but equal" has become a cliché, but it wasn't at the time the Fuller Court rendered its decision. In fact, the written opinion used the phrase "equal but separate," not "separate but equal."
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Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 US 537 (1896) was decided on April 13, 1896, while President Grover Cleveland was still in office. William McKinley won the Presidential election in November 1896, but didn't take office until the following year.
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The landmark case that desegregated schools was Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483, a 1954 case in which the Supreme Court Justices unanimously ruled segregation in the public schools was unconstitutional. Chief Justice Earl Warren, in writing the Court opinion, declared "separate e…
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Plessy v. Ferguson is a US Supreme Court case heard in 1896 that challenged a Louisiana law requiring African-Americans and Caucasians to travel in separate railway cars.
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Plessy v. Ferguson, (1896) was an appeal of a Louisiana state law, the Separate Car Act of 1890, that required railroad companies to provide separate train cars for African-American and Caucasian travelers. The Louisiana state courts upheld the law, so Plessy (and the Citizens' Committee, an early c…
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they had railroads that were segregated
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Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954) The landmark case that desegregated schools was Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483, a 1954 case in which the Supreme Court Justices unanimously ruled segregation in the public schools was unconstitutional. Chief Justice Earl Warren, i…
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