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English to Scottish Gaelic and Irish (Gaelic)

~12900 answered questions
Parent Category: Translations
Translating English words into Irish. How you say and spell English language words and phrases in the Irish language.
The Irish Gaelic original is spelled cladach [klad-ukh] with a gutteral ending. The word also occurs in Scottish Gaelic (Gaidhlig) as cladach /kLadəx/ shore, littoral; (sea) beach
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Erin Go Braugh?Bragh? Dia duit. That's "hello" in Irish. The correct spelling is 'ERIN GO BRAGH' and it simply means ' IRELAND FOREVER.' Slan(goodbye) "Erin go bragh" is the incorrect, anglicized way of saying and spelling it. To be entirely accurate, it is like this: "eire go brach"Accordingto e…
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Some terms for a young Irish Girl include: Lass/lassie gearrchaile, young girl/lass girseach, young girl cailín beag, little girl Interestingly, cailín óg means 'a grown-up girl'.
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It was the old name the vikings had given to Dublin in Ireland Dubh Linn means Black Pool. DUPH IS also Russian word today and it means MAPLE. LINN IS used in finnish and estonian language and it means TOWN/FORT(RESS) There was living scandinavians and this name is from vikings!!!   As…
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A derogatory slang term used by combat military personnel to describe other military personnel with office, administrative or support jobs. The term is relative and varies in meaning from true disdain to affection. A foot soldier might refer to all air support personnel or to other soldiers not curr…
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The first thing you need to understand is the trinity of sisters known as albana,banba and of course Erin. The original term of this statement was banba go brea banba being one of the original names of Ireland. It was used primarily as a battle cry espicealy during the Norman invasions. The scottish…
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"An Gorta Mór" (a gurta mór)
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I found this elsewhere and have confirmed it."Mo chuisle" literally means "my pulse." It's from a longer phrase: A chuisle mo chroí," which means "pulse of my heart." It's an endearment. Normally when speaking TO the person, you would say "a chuisle"...you would only use "mo chuisle" when speaking …
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It should be Éire go deo or Éirinn go deo. Ireland forever.Usually translated as "Éirinn go brách'.
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Ireland forever. More usually spelled "Erin go bragh" or "Erin go braugh" it is a phonetic English approximation of the Irish Gaelic "Éirinn go brách". Éire is a more standard spelling of Éirinn. See the wikipedia: Erin go bragh
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Fáilte is the Irish word for 'welcome'.
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The phrase appears in both Irish Gaelic and Scottish Gaelic. In both, it means "A Hundred Thousand Welcomes". In Irish Gaelic, it's spelled Céad Míle Fáilte. In Gaelic (Scottish), Ceud Mìle Fàilte. That's fine for a sign in a pub or shop. But to be grammatically correct, if you're saying i…
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"CÉAD MÍLE FÁILTE" means "100,000 Welcomes".
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"Céad míle fáilte" means "a hundred thousand welcomes"
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Irish Gaelic: síocháin, pron. 'shee-okh-awn' is the closest literal word for 'peace'. also Suaimhneas [sooanus]Scots Gaelic: sìth, fois,
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Welcome, as in BORD FÁILTE, the Irish Tourist Board.
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Some Irish proverbs: "Is milis fíon, is searbh a íoc." "Wine is sweet, its payment bitter." "Is minic a bhris béal duine a shrón" "(It is) often a person's mouth broke his nose" "Aithníonn ciaróg ciaróg eile" "One beetle recognises another (beetle)" "Aghaidh an oilc i bhfad uainn" "The face …
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See the wikipedia article on "Erin go bragh".
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Answer "I am Irish born." In Éirinn a rugadh mé. Rugadh mé = I was born (Irish) Rugadh mi (Scottish)
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the offical language of Ireland is English, so you would say it the same as here  Actually the first official language of Ireland is Irish. English is the second official language. Unfortunately my Irish would not be good enough to translate the land of opportunity into Irish Irish and Englis…
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Boy........gasúr, buachaill, garsún, stócach. Girl.........cailín, little girl....gearrchaile, girseach, cailín beag
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In Irish: gasúr; buachaill; (over 15 yrs.) stócachIn Scots Gaelic: balach; gille
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Go raibh maith agat (agaibh, plural).
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"Erin go Braugh" is not in Irish but an English phonetic spelling of the original Éirinn go brách [aerin guh braw]
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"pulse of my heart" an Irish language phrase of endearment.It should be spelled cuisle mo chroí (accute accent on final i).
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Irish (Gaelic):Éirinn go brách (aer'-rin guh brawch)Scottish Gaelic: ...
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Translation from Ulster Irish: "Well. How are you? You are a fine looking man". With the accent marks: "Bhuel, cad é mar tá tú? Is fear dóighiúil thú."
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In Gaelic, "Alba an Aigh" is "Scotland the Brave". It's also the title of one of several patriotic songs considered an unofficial national anthem of Scotland.
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Answer muinín- pronounced "mwin-een" Another Answer: Irish (Gaelic): muinín, iontaoibh Scots Gaelic: earbsa, creideas
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Scottish Gaelic has two words for 'star': 'reannag'/'rionnag'and 'reul'
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Answer In an english/Irish dictionary!. Available at read ireland.com
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you are referring to "sure and begorrah" which is a phrase i have never heard used in Ireland and which makes most Irish people cringe when they hear it on t.v. in films etc. it has no meaning and should be quietly let drift into oblivion.
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Answer you sometimes can't translate literally into Irish - the sentence "I was lucky " would translate as "Bhí an t-ádh liom", literally - "the luck was with me". "ádh" = luck. Additional: ámharach, ádhúil, séanmhar = "lucky". "Fear ámharach" = "a lucky man"
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no im not Going to answer the questions ... you guys need to now dont be little babies yo motherf@$@er...
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Mouth Music ? I'm from Glasgow, Scotland and I'm sorry to say I've never heard of Scottish Mouth Music. Maybe it is played in the Highlands and/or Islands of Scotland where much of the traditional folk music comes from.  Yes, it exists! I'm from Edinburgh, Scotland, and I can confidently say t…
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"Ádh mór ort"
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As in "Erin go Braugh"? That is a phonetic English spelling of "Éirinn go brách" which literally means "Ireland until Judgment Day" or "Ireland forever". Braugh is not a Gaelic spelling.
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[Scottish Gaelic] 'Blood is thicker than water' = 'Tha n' fhuil nas tiugh n' t-uisge' [Pronounced: Ha nool nas chew nan tooisk]
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"Ireland forever" The proper Irish Gaelic is Éirinn go brách.
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Irish is gréasaí;Scottish is greusaiche.
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Don't mean to be pedantic , but the use of mo chara, isn't right in this context. Mo chara does mean 'my friend' but in the context above it would be a chara. Also the correct way of writing the phrase is Tog é go bog é the go gives it the adverb . Bog = soft; go bog = softly Tog é go bog é , a …
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The name McCoy is both Scots and Irish. The name derives fom the Gaelic "Mac Aodha". It is anglicized McCoy by a family in Co. Limerick which migrated there from Ulster. MacAodha is also found in Co. Galway and of Scottish origin in Ulster. (Sloinnte Gael is Gall, P. Woulfe).
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Is Éireannach thú go deo
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it means "long ago"
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Éirinn go brách! or Éire go brách!
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There are three languages that might be described as 'Gaelic'; Scottish Gaelic, Manx and Irish. Manx died out in the twentieth century. The language has been revived, but there are still only a small number of speakers. Scottish Gaelic never died out, but it is spoken by only a minority of Scottis…
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Maitheas na beatha
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My passion is to achieved my dream
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One Answer:Mactíre (son of the land) and madra allta (wild dog) are the current terms, but the Irish Gaelic for "wolf-hound" is cú faoil. Faol is an old word for "wolf" and is found in the surname Ó Faoláin (Phelan, Whalen). The term 'faolchú' is also used for 'wolf'. The following answer/mini…
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Cneamhaire; caimiléir; bithiúnach
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In Scottish Gaelic, the word for 'cheers' is slà inte mhath, meaning 'good health'. It is pronounced as 'slaancha vaa'.
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In Irish it's "cuir tú i do luí"
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Answer The same way everyone else does,crying etc.
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Scottish Gaelic for 'Grandmother' is 'Seanmhair'.
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'Shamus' is an English phonetic spelling of the Irish Séamus and Scottish Gaelic Seumas which are equivalents of James.
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Irish is a language more complex than English. You have to learn it.
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'Wester Ross' is a large area in the North West Highlands of Scotland. (Does that help?)And are you thinking of 'Balamory'? If so, that is a fictional village on an island in a children's TV series. It's actually set on the Island of Mull off the coast of South West Scotland.
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Actually "mo chara" simply means "my friend", "mo" means "my" and "chara" means "friend"It's 'my friend' in Irish Gaelic.
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Éire is the usual name used in modern Irish, and is one of the two official names of the Republic of Ireland. "Éirinn" is the dative case, while "Éireann" is the genitive case. Older names include Banba, Fodla, Ériu and Erin.
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Answer "Cornais" = Cornish language "Cornach" = Cornish person or something belonging to Cornwall Another Answer: Coirnis = Cornish language
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In Scottish Gaelic it is 'loidse Còrnach' or 'Taigh-geata Còrnach'.
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In Irish it's "an Rí na mbuaiteorí ar fad".The Norse language and Gaelic are not closely related, BTW.
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Layla Either translate it into gealic or use it straight. Then use a straight substitution with the ogham letters. (see first link under related links) Go to my website The Oghamzone. Look for Create Your Name In Ogham on the Menu bar. Here you can drag and drop Ogham letters onto the Ogham Pendan…
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Irish Gaelic: an Domhan (as the world)Scots Gaelic: an cruinne-cè, an Talamh, an Domhan (world/universe)Welsh:
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Generally, they were very big. On average there were ten children per family.
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"Horo" is common in songs but has no translation "Màiri dhubh" means "Black-haired Mary".
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The best way to learn to be confident in yourself is to look at what you can do. Examine all of your skills. If you are not proud of anything that you already know how to do, you can learn new skills. Having a hobby or talent that you can take pride in is the first step in believing in yourself.
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go n-eirí an t-ádh leat
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Irish people have differing pigmentation and hair color. "Black Irish" just means Irish with black (or very dark brown) hair.
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"you Geonai" should be "i gCónaí" "Claoi i gCónaí" means "Always Adhere"
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The name Jessica was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice', where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH which would have been spelled Jesca in his time. Jessica is also sometimes used as a feminine form…
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I have an opposite opinion to that described in the website link above. I believe that one can have many twin souls and only one soul mate. Twin souls are family members or close friends who are very much like you, ie they share interests, opinions, and react to things much in the same way you do. Y…
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Irish: f-yunn (N & W)f-yoon (S)Scottish:
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That's not English, but Irish, if I'm not mistaken. It means "my dear" (see http://www.englishirishdictionary.com/dictionary?language=irish&word=a%20chroí) ETA; While a chroí is a term of endearment, it technically means 'my heart.' Actually, gramatically speaking, 'mo chroí' means 'my heart…
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A smile: meangadh, fáthadh, miongháire. To smile: Déanaim miongháire, Tagann fáthadh gáire orm.
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Tá grá agam duit.
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The phrase "Lá breithe sona duit" means "Happy Birthday to you" in Irish (Gaelic).
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Alba gu bràth (pron: al-op-pa goo bra) means, literally, "Scotland till judgment" or, loosely, "Scotland forever." The Irish phrase, 'Erin go bragh' is from Scottish Gaelic, and comes originally from a 19th century Scottish song, titled 'Erin go bragh' (Eirinn gu bràth, in Sc. Gaelic). There is a …
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Alba an Aigh is Scotland the Brave
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My Heart's in the Highlands Tha Mo Chridhe sa Ghàidhealtachd
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Answer:If you are asking about a Irish ("Gaelic') word for 'cure' or 'remedy', the word is "leigheas" which in Irish rhymes with "ice".    Answer:The correct pronunciation is L-ey-s, because the accented vowel is the Gaelic long vowel it makes an ey sound as in hey and the short s sound.…
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Always adhere.
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Answer The Irish for 'luck' is 'ádh'
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"A ghrá" means "my love" in Irish Gaelic (when addressing someone).
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'Erin go bragh' is an English spelling of the Irish Éirinn go brách meaning 'Ireland forever'.
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Answer A woman in Irish is bean \bæn\. Cailín means a girl.
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Fear ceirde or ceardaí in Irish; Scottish Gaelic: druineach
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The Irish word for 'grandmother' is seanmháthair. (shan-waw-hir) or máthair mhór [mawhir wór]. 'Grandma" would be Mamó, Móraí or Mam chríonna. Granaidh in Scottish Gaelic.
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Scottish Gaelic: seanair Scots: granda Fife in Scotland they say ---> Diseanair
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'Óró sé do bheatha abhaile' means 'you are welcome home'. The name of a patriotic Irish song by Pádraic Pearse.
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Déan tú fhéin , 'Djaen too hayn' , although it doesn't make much sense. What context are you using it in?
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Arda an Chaisleáin
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granaidh
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Seasaidh/Seasag are equivalents of Jessie.
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I can't find any Gaelic version of the name.
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If you are trying to DIY translate 'the luck of the Irish' it is an t-ádh dearg. This could also be translated as 'real luck' or 'extreme luck'.
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See related links. I would definitely avoid google translator; it does not produced accurate translations.
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Irish is sláinte and Scottish is slàinte.
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I may also mean the DRUG ENFORCEMENT AGENCYDea is the pricess of albania. she owned the butrini. she was know as Dea of Butrini. Hi its kelly, :) no! actually Dea was a princess, the princess of Butrint(in albania), but the real meaning of Dea is goddess(italian) . i am 100% ure about it, cuz meh …
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