Answered

Wood-Burning Stoves

It might be considered primitive in today's high-tech world, but there's no heat as cozy as that of a wood-burning stove. Questions about the differences in the various types of wood you can burn, hardwoods vs. softwoods, safety precautions when using your stove, cooking in - or on - the stove, and more.
An easy way is to use a paint scraper. Any sharp edged object should be useful. It is important that you do this regularly...soot can actually catch fire if left to build up, and can therefore be very dangerous.
Combustion is a chemical reaction defined by the release of carbon dioxide and water. When wood is burnt it releases water in a gaseous state, such as steam, and carbon dioxide. Though a wood burning stove may not heat up as fast as an electric stove, it may release less carbon dioxide. Obviously an...
Assuming you have access to the hinge mechanism. This item will probably be made of cast iron, and the hinge mechanism has rusted solidly. Care must be exercised to avoid breaking the cast iron as it is a brittle material, and some of its substance will have been consumed into making rust. Thus...
to let air flow in Thir are 2 on top and 2 on the bottom, what is the dfference
It's next to impossible. You could try chipping it off, or you bring the stove outside and burn off the plastic.
Not a good idea. Some varieties of sumac contain the same toxic chemical as poison oak.
Splitting firewood can be done mechanically or by hand. A hydraulicwood splitter can make splitting large amounts of firewood easy.These units can be expensive, around $1,000 for one powered by agas engine. Splitting firewood by hand using a splitting axe ormaul is the more traditional way. The...
This handle would be for emptying ashes that fall below the grate i would think.
There is RUSTED, and RUSTY. Rusted would be deep pits, holes, etc. Rusty would be a thin layer of superficial rust. Deeply rusted surfaces may need wire brushing (use safety glasses). Lighter surface rusting may be controlled by use of grease- warm stove, newspaper, and shortening. Make a large ball...
Properly managed logging is beneficial. It permits managing tree growth, and harvesting useful timber. My family includes tree farmers- they PLANT trees to grow and be harvested.
Wood burning cookstoves are still made. They are rather expensive, but still available. One source (one of many possible sources) is Lehman's. This is a company in Kidron OH that sells various non-electric products. You can find them in an internet search. Used wood cookstoves may sometimes be found...
NO!!! Tanilised wood is another term for lumber that has been chemically treated to resist rot and insects. The chemical used are CCA- copper, chrome, and arsenic. Chrome and Arsenic are especially toxic, and this wood is no longer sold in the US for "Consumer contact" lumber, such as decks,...
the maple wood burns the longest
One measure does not directly translate to another. A BTU is the amount of heat that it takes to raise the temp of one pound of water by one degree F. A burning match, and a burning fireplace may both be at 650 degrees, but the fireplace gives off more heat (more BTUs)
Assuming this is a first aid question, avoid putting anything on a burn from heat. DO NOT put butter or grease on the burn. It can be covered with a clean, dry dressing to protect it. There are spray products made with aloe vera and lidocaine that can be used for pain- but a LARGE burn should be...
Some wood burning stoves are made of enameled steel, but the enamel is applied at the factory. The enamel is actually a form of glass, which is applied to the steel as a powder and then melted and fused on in an oven or kiln at a very high temperature. It is not the kind of thing that can be done in...
When you burn a wood, the volatile gases present in the wood heat up to about 500 degrees Fahrenheit. The compound molecules break apart, followed by the reintegration of the atoms with oxygen, as well as carbon dioxide and other substances. After the burning process, the water in the wood is lost,...
Burning wood can be harmful to the atmosphere or not, depending on how it is done. A clean burn can be quite clean, but a dirty burn can be quite dirty, causing pollution from smoke. Grass should not be burned unless you actually know that no chemical treatments have been used on the grass....
Yes, because when it is burned the fire makes all the water in the wood evaporate, and water weighs a significant amount, so the wood is much lighter. Yes. It becomes lighter because it is being consumed, and converted to other substances. Most of the original material disappears due to...
Wood is a non-efficient fuel. Disadvantages of burning wood are: 1. It leads to emission of harmfull gases like sulphur dioxide, carbon momnoxide etc. 2. It on burning leaves behind residual wastes. 3. Burning of wood on a large scale is responsible for air pollution. 4. We need to cut...
Poplar is the wood the wooden matches are made from. It burns VERY quickly, has a fairly low heat value, and produces few coals for lasting heat. It is not BAD to burn- just not really good. We burn it to dispose of it, or to use for kindling- I would not BUY poplar to burn.
Yes, for cooking and for heating. Wood stoves, oil stoves, gas stoves, and electric stoves.
Depends on the location. Many rural areas in the US had limited electrical service. They were common in urban areas, along with gas stoves.
If there is a possibility this is CCA treated wood, it is not a good idea. This is the "green wood" treated lumber common for the past 40 years of so. It was used for exterior wood to resist rot and insects. CCA stands for Chrome-Copper-Arsenic- the 3 metals used to treat the wood. Smoke from this...
I believe that it turns into ashes and smoke.
Wood undergoes pyrolysis as it burns. Pyrolysis is the destructive distillation of the wood, producing gasses, which burn as they leave the wood, and carbon, which will also eventually burn. This is how wood normally burns. There is a link to an article on pyrolysis below.
Both. Heated wood gives off gasses that burn. Charcoal (carbon) will also burn.
Not as good as oak or hickory, but much better than some other woods. We use a fair amount of it mixed with oak. It is very difficult to split, but burns well when seasoned.
The flue is the chimney, where the hot air rises through, thereby drawing more air into the front of the stove. ----- The flue is the duct that carries gaseous combustion products away from the fire. It includes the chimney, but also includes the stovepipe and possibly other ducts. In the case...
Many wood burning electric pens DO have different shaped tips. Check with the maker of your brand of pen.
The glass on a wood stove will get dirty because of creosote deposits - smoke. The solution is to aim for a cleaner burn, which might mean going to a cleaner burning wood, better seasoned wood, or increasing the draft and letting the stove burn hotter. You should also check the flue system and...
Magnolia has a heat value similar to Willow. It is not as good as Oak, but better than Poplar. It will need seasoning (drying), and will weigh about 35 lbs per cu ft when dry, compared to Oak at 57 lbs per cu ft. Not bad wood, not the best.
VERY rough rule of thumb- the heavier and denser the wood WHEN DRY, the higher the heat value. Wood such as poplar, cedar, and pine are low density, and very light, and burn quickly. Heavier woods, such as oak, gum, ash and hickory, will burn longer, and give more heat.
That is one of the few woods that may NOT be a good idea to burn in quantity. They contain a natural toxin, known as Grayanotoxin. It has a potential to cause health problems, including hallucinations. I know of no actual cases of harm caused by burning the wood- it is usually from honey derived...
Yes, by dry heating without acces to air. One of the products -besides of charcoal- is ' spirit of wood ' which is methanol, CH 3 OH. (toxic, blindness)
Yes, wood burning is an example of combustion.
Not a good idea. Different heat, combustion air requirements. Dangerous.
Spruce, pine and fir are all soft woods, and tend to have too high a sap content to burn in a wood stove. The higher sap content translates into greater creosote production in your chimney and can lead to a fire. Stick to harder woods. They burn longer with more heat produced and a cleaner chimney.
Burning wood is not necessarily bad for the environment. It can be bad, if it is not done with consideration for the environment, but if it is done properly, it can actually be beneficial. Harvesting wood can be bad for the environment, but it need not be. Done responsibly, it is part of good...
i believe it is the model number for an old montgomery ward parlor stove sold in the 1970's. my model number is 68-ymt-7387.
You need to know the style, size, condition and a visual inspection before you can ever begin to try and evaluate the value.
Pine will make great kindling- to light the fire. However, it will burn very quickly, produce few coals for long lasting heat, and produces a lot of creosote that will need to be cleaned from your chimney. It would be a good idea to keep a little dry pine for kindling, but find a good hardwood such...
Wood is first split to increase the exposed surface, and permit water in the wood to evaporate to the air- curing or drying. Wood is also split into smaller pieces, again increasing the exposed surface area, to permit the temperature of the wood to be quickly raised above the kindling temperature,...
While you CAN burn any wood (except petrified wood, which is now stone) the best wood for heating purposes will be dry hardwords, such as oak, ash, hickory, apple, etc. Softwood, such as pine, fir, cedar, has relatively low heat value (you burn a lot for a little heat) and produces a lot of creosote...
Yes what number planet is it? What parts are you after? Are you happy with second hand?
Fair. Splits well, burns easily, not a lot of heat. But when I lived in Colorado, you had a choice of Aspen or Fir/ Spruce- and Aspen was the better of the two. Heat output is about 60% of white oak.
With a magnifying glass
Electric stoves do not need to be vented. Gas stoves also do not need to be vented, altho a hood that is vented outside would be a good idea to cut down on the cooking odors and fumes that might be given off by the burning gas. Same goes for propane burning stoves.. All wood burning stoves need to...
Stop touching the stove. Treat the burn.
The ideal firewood ? DRY hardwood- such as oak, hickory, ash, that has been cut and allowed to dry for 12 months. Green wood, and pine/spruce/fir will produce a lot of creosote- which coats the inside of the chimney and smoke pipes- creating a fire hazard. The worst would be a toxic wood- such as...
A stove board is a rectangle or square of sheet steel, usually having sides of about three or four feet, backed with thin insulation, used for the stove to sit on to protect the floor. You can also protect the wall behind a stove by putting a stove board behind it. Very old stove boards might be...
You will need to check with the maker of YOUR stove. Some may be changed from wood to coal by changing the grates and/or firebrick. Others are not constructed of a grade of steel that will permit it.
Softwoods such as spruce, pine and fir will ignite easily and will give off considerable heat, but will also burn up very quickly and will throw lots of sparks from the sap entrapped in the wood. If you are burning these woods indoors in an open fireplace, you will need a fine mesh screen or barrier...
I Have the same model and I've been trying to find parts. All the information that I have is it's a Kenmore Sears Cannon Heater. You can still find the parts breakdown at The link is below. The only parts they still carry are small hardware.
Fruit wood makes a beautiful aroma when burnt, but this is not likely to be commercially available, other than from an almond orchard. A good approach would be to grow one of your own, perhaps in a pot, and improve your neighbourhood as well as your own space. The small quantity of prunings...
Except for petrified wood (wood that has turned to stone) all wood will burn. Some burns easier than others, some gives off more heat, and some woods are poisonous, and should not be burned- but all wood is capable of burning.
i have one and stamped on the plate on the front door Jacobs Mfg. bridgport ala. I would like to know what year it is?
absolutely....one of the best, in my opinion..I have been heating with wood for 32 years, and get very good results using locust for burning in my woodstove. It seems to fall somewhere between oak and hickory, as far as, density, btu's, and lasting qualities. I would highly recommend it to anyone.
Too many variables to give one simple answer. Depends on type of wood, moisture content, and airflow (draft) Wood begins to burn at around 450 degrees F. Hoever, woods with a high resin content, burning under a forced draft can exceed 1,500 F. Enough to turn steel bright cherry red.
One of the best. High heat values, long lasting, little creosote.
My guess would be to render any smoke/soot that gets out and on the stove invisible.... you'd get that nasty black smudge if you touched it but visually you wouldn't be able to distinguish the soot from the stove.... so I think its purely cosmetic answer 2 Well, the answer is in the question "...
A first step will be to see if a permit is required where you live- some places require them. Next, if you have a NEW stove- READ the instructions. If you have a USED stove, check the condition- firebrick intact, unwarped doors, intact door gaskets, no missing parts or bolts. Consider where the...
It all depends if the exaust flue is on top on at the rear. In both cases Throat plate or fire deflector plate as some call it will be different for top or rear exaust. The rear throat plate is usually at a 45 degree angle from the back to mid portion of interior of stove , preventing flames from...
Not a good idea. Most aluminum alloys will warp under the heat of a wood stove. Probable fire hazard.
Cedar would not be a first choice. It will burn very quickly, has relatively low heat values, and will produce a lot of creosote. Can make good kindling.
It's far from the best but as long as it is well seasoned it will make a fast and very hot fire.
Using wet wood, I had to cook many meals outside after Hurricane Sandy due to no electricity for our kitchen stove. I used a twig stove for cooking outside in our back yard. For the first four days the twigs were wet. The sun finally came out on the sixth day after Hurricane Sandy. Using the wet...
Seasoned (dry) white oak may be one of the BEST woods you can use. Oak, hickory, and ash wood have high heat values, low creosote production, and long lasting coals. Good stuff!
Air circulation is the most effective means of drying wood- both firewood and lumber. Stack the wood off the ground, in such a way that air can move through the stacked wood. Do NOT cover the sides, but cover the top with anything that will shed water. Of course, split firewood will dry quicker,...
No. Sublimation is a physical phase change in which a solid vaporizes without going through a liquid change. Sublimation does not involve a chemical change. Iodine sublimes, passing directly from solid to gas. Clearly, this is not what happens when wood burns. When wood burns, the first thing that...
A wood cook stove differs from other wood stoves in that it is especially adapted for cooking. Typically, this means that it has a large cast iron top area, with lids that can be lifted out so pots can be exposed directly to the fire or hot gasses, if desired. There is usually a flue system that...
There are a couple of different plants that may be called Pepperwood. One is known as Hercule's Club or Hercules Mace, due to large spiky type growths on the trunk. These contain an oil that has some numbing effects, and is called the Toothache Tree in some areas (used as a herbal medicine for...
Benjamin Franklin is generally credited with the invention of the wood stove. The development of the wood stove is rather more complex than a single invention, however. What Franklin did was to improve on the fireplace with an iron fireplace insert that heated air from the room and pushed it back...
Not my first choice. Burns quickly, lot of creosote.
Yes. Much of the "pulpwood" is pine used to make paper pulp.
If the stove was designed with legs (most are) then you should have legs on the stove. This is to keep the very hot parts of the stove away from things that can burn. Some masonry stoves do not have legs- but weigh several tons, and will never get hot enough to cause a fire.
A Barometric Damper when used properly will help regulate the draft. This in return will allow for better combustion, longer burns and less fuel to be used. One problem with a Barometric Damper is the chimney will run a little cooler due to the introduction of room air. If the unit isn't being...
NO. They have been treated with preservatives that will produce possibly poisonous gases.
Answer . \nYes, or you may face a non renewal. Insurance companies can from time to time change what risks they will remain insuring and which they won't. If you don't comply with their new requirements and with sufficient notice they may non-renew your policy.
The heat from a wood stove tends to be a "dry heat". The humidity level is low (moisture in the air) and things dry out. Keeping a ketle of water on the stove heats it, making it evaporate, and restoring moisture to the air. Mosit air will FEEL warmer.
As a practical matter, room for air to circulate and spread heat. From a safety standpoint, that will depend on the surface near the stove. Obviously, less clearance is needed if the wall is brick, more if it is wood paneling. The link below will take you to an article of clearances, and a link in...
yes but it has to be dried for about three years... then it will burn quickly, giving off medium heat... but the resin will be a problem if you don't clean your chimney regularly.
I don't know the exact value although I have some parts to that model, passed on to me by my dad many years ago,,,,
Well dried oak is one of the BEST firewoods. It has high heat values, low creosote production, splits well, long lasting coals. Ash and Hickory are better, but not by much. GREAT firewood.