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Rotation

Parent Category: Mechanics
Classical mechanics doesn't just describe how an object's position behaves under external influences, but also how its orientation behaves. Using the same principles found in Newtonian mechanics, laws and relations governing rotation can also be derived. Please direct all your questions about moments of inertia, angular velocity, angular momentum, centripetal force, centrifugal force, torque, and spin here.
Usually in orbits unless it is artificial
Assuming that "r" is the radius, that simply isn't sufficient  information to calculate angular velocity.
Angular momentum = r x p... That is position vector r, CROSSED (not  multiplied) with momentum vector p. So, to find out the direction  the angular momentum will act, take ur right hand, point your  fingers in the direction of r, and "curl" (close/bend whatever u  wanna call it) ur FINGERS (not...
In any circular movement, including driving in a curve, the  centripetal force (and the corresponding centrifugal force, which  is often considered a "fictitious force") will increase:   * When the speed increases   * When the radius of curvature decreases
It's a bit complicated to list here so please follow the related link below.
You can calculate the centripetal ACCELERATION with one of these  formulae:   acceleration = velocity squared / radius   acceleration = omega squared x radius   Acceleration refers to the magnitude of the acceleration; the  direction is towards the center.   Omega is the angular speed,...
Usually you would use some fact you know about the physical system,  and then write an equation that states that the total angular  momentum "before" = the total angular momentum "after" some event.
Total angular momentum is always conserved - there is no way you  can violate that law. So, the answer is yes.
The relationship between those four can be found from using the original centripetal force equation, Fc = (mv2)/r. Since we know v=d/t, we can sub that into the equation to get Fc=(md2)/(rT2), where T is actually the period. Now, we know the distance it travels is in a circular motion, so we can...
  == Answer ==   They are not both forces. Think about that and that answers your question. 
The Earth rotates in 1 day. The moon takes 27.32 days to rotate.
Axis of rotation is an imaginary line about which a turning body rotates. Or the center around something rotates.
say your mass (m) is 100 kgvelocity (v) at equator = 40 030 000 / 86164 = 464.6 metres / secearth radius(r) = 6 371 000 metresacceleration due to gravity at earths surface (g) = 9.82 (m/s)/s.gravity force at earth surface ( f = m * g) = 100 * 9.82 = 982 newtons.centripetal force at equator f = m * (...
Centripetal force always points to the center of a circle. Gravity is a centripetal force because it all leads to the center of the Earth. When you throw a baseball on Earth, the baseball won't go very far because gravity is pulling it down.
Usually angles are measured in degrees, 360 degrees being full circle. There are also radians, full circle being 2 x PI
If you take any energy off of the wheel, then it won't spin at 5RPM any more. And if you keep taking energy from it, then pretty soon it'll stopspinning. You can get just as much energy out of it as it took to spin it upto 5 RPM.
( Any unit of length ) x ( any unit offorce ) is a perfectly good unit of torque. You may need to use a few conversion factors if you want it to worktogether with anybody else's normal system of units, but it definitely hasdimensions of torque.
Momentum is the product of mass and velocity p=mv. Torque is vector energy T=fxd=fdsin(fd), the vector analogy of scalar energy, work W=f.d= -fdcos(fd).
velocity= time / displacement velocity also includes directionsex: 10 m/s due north(this would be the displacement.)Velocity is how fast an object is going WITH DIRECTION.The S unit for velocity is m/s with direction. Ex. v= 120 miles south / 3 hrs. v= 40 mi/hr SOUTH.Velocity has to have direction....
When an object rolls the center of gravity (or of geometry - or both depending on the shape of the object) translates (moves) along a path and there is a point of contact with a surface on the perimeter of the object, rotation (angular change) does occur too. During rotation the center of gravity...
A centripetal force is, by definition, a force that makes a body follow a curved path. So, yes, a centripetal force causes rotation about a point in space.
no, but rotation can produce centripetal force
no angular acceleration is not producd by torque is a factor of torque T= anguar aceleration X momentum I say yes, because torque is another word for a couple that is equivalent to two equal parallel forces in opposite directions but separated by a distance. Torque acting on an inertia produces...
You could have 'newton-centimeters', or 'newton-inches', or 'poundmeters' etc., but you can't have 'newton pounds'. Torque is (a distance) x (a force), but 'newton pound' is (force) x(force). Whether or not that has any physical significance at all, it'ssurely not torque.
Torque is the combination of perpendicular distance and weight; it is not a true force
the force which lies in the center of the gravity
When two forces acting on the same wheel are equal and opposite but applied at different points on the rim.
The torque required to run a nut down a thread on certain types of nuts designed to resist vibration loosening. The resistance can be provided by a plastic insert or a noncircular head.
When a top spins, there is a little bit of work being done: The top attempts to maintiain a conservation of angular momentum, which is why as the top slows, it tends to wander more and more across the table.
By radial force, we can assume you mean centripetal force Centripetal force = (Mass)(Radius)(Angular velocity)2
Centrifugal (center fleeing) force is the scalar force pulling away from the origin, -cmDel.V = -cDel.P = -cp/r cos(P). The negative sign indicates away from origin. Centrifugal force is a real force resulting from the vector derivative (Divergence) of the vector energy, cP, Momentum energy. ...
There are 4 bolts that hold the seat on that need to come off. First, you'll need a Phillips head screwdriver to remove two plastic panels, one of which is by the gear shift lever, and the other by the carb. With these panels removed, you'll have access to the front two (10MM) seat bolts. The one on...
speed= distance per seconds & torque= revolution per seconds
Angular momentum is the moment of momentum, a conserved vector quantity used to state the overall condition of a physical system.
 Angular momentum is always conserved, just like linear momentum is  always conserved.    Initial angular momentum = Final angular momentum   Angular momentum = moment of inertia * angular velocity    Initial moment of inertia * initial angular velocity = Final moment  of inertia *...
Yes, it happens in a motor
No. Friction is a function of Normal Force and the friction coefficient, nothing else.
The two forces will produce the same torque if : R1xF1 = R2xF2; r1f1sin(R1F1) = r2f2sin(R2F2). The magnitude of the forces can be the same (f1=f2=f) but their angles with the the displacement (R) can be different, r1fsin(R1F1) = r2fsin(R2F2),and the torque will be the same. Torque is the vector...
The torque from the force, T = r X F = .2m*40N*sin(90o) = 8Nm. The angular acceleration, A = (w-0)/t = 10/4 = 2.5rad/s2. As, T = IA, then I = T/A, so I = 8Nm/2.5rad/s2. = 3.2 kgm2.
It means to turn it without it going in a complete circle
Audio CD players read their discs at a precise, constant rate( 4.3218 Mbit/s of raw physical data for 1.4112 Mbit/s (180.6 kB/s)of usable audio data) and thus must vary the disc's rotational speed from 8 Hz ( 480 rpm ) when reading at the innermost edge, to 3.5 Hz ( 210rpm ) at the outer edge....
  There are some either way, of course there is no up or down in space so any galaxy that spins one way from above spins the other way from below.
The clothes have a centripetal force (the walls of the machine provide this) which pushes them towards the center of the tub, not out of it. But the water lacks a centripetal force (it fits through the holes in the walls of the wash tub) to keep it from leaving the path of circular motion, so...
  Breakaway torque is the torque required to start the initial movement, in the loosening direction, of a bolt, screw, or nut from its (non−loaded) at rest position with the locking element engaged.     Tightening torque is the torque necessary to move the bolt, screw, or nut along its...
If your talking about NFL then We spin footballs to minimize the effect of air resistance on the ball. That makes it go further and follow a more straight path. Its got something to do with angular momentum
electric motors produce torque so in the sense yes
The spin is forced on to the bullet or shell by grooves in the gun barrel, this is to take advantage of the fact that the axis of a rotating object will tend to remain parallel, this , in effect keeps the shell or bullet in a good aerodynamic profile, without tumbling (which absorbs energy). These...
a = v^2/r.r = 0.25 metresv = ((0.25 * 2 * pi * 20) / 60) = 0.5236 metres / secso:a = (0.5236^2) / 0.25.a = 1.097 (m/s)/s
Anything spinning at a constant rate (even if the rate of spin iszero).
Muscles produce forces by contacting their length. Forces can be turned into torques through the action of joints as pivots and bones as levers.
Yes, angular velocity is a vector quantity
yeah,bcoz it moves in circle around a specific point.
With that amount of information, you can't. You'd also need to knowwhat effect that torque had on the object ... things like how its rate ofrotation changed, its shape (so that you could determine its moment of intertia),etc. In other words, in addition to the net torque on the object, youalso need...
23 hours 56 minutes and about4 seconds
Centripetal force is a force that makes a body follow a curved path: it is always directed orthogonal to the velocity of the body, toward the instantaneous center of curvature of the path. I linked my source.
a = v^2 / rwhere:a = centripetal acceleration ((metres / second) / second)v = orbital velocity (metres/second)r = orbital radius from earth centre of gravity (metres)
Torque is the tendency of a force to rotate the body to which it is applied.Torque is always specified with regard to the axis of rotation. It is equal to the magnitude of the component of the force lying in the plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation, multiplied by the shortest distance between...
the equation for rotational kinetic energy (KE) is:.KE = 0.5 * I * ((rad / sec)^2), where I is the mass moment of inertia..so if the kinetic energy remains constant, the only thing that can alter the rotation rate (rad / sec), is I, the mass moment of inertia
\n \n t = r X F , where t is torque, r is displacement, and F is force; all quantities are vectors. Because the formula contains a cross product, the magnitude of the torque is given by the expression rFsin(θ), where θ is the angle between the position vector and the force vector.
No. 10 inch pounds = about 1.13 newton meters.
The energy that the object has when it's spinning is never "usedup", unless there's something acting on the object to rob energy from it. Inour daily experience on Earth, there's ALWAYS some friction acting on aspinning object. The friction robs energy from it, and it eventually stops spinning...
Our home planet is ROTATING at 1000 miles per hour. Standing still,  you are actually going that fast. Add the ORBITAL VELOCITY of the  planet going around the sun. Add the GALACTIC VELOCITY of the solar  system circling the hub of the Milky Way Galaxy. Then add the  radial expansion rates of...
Sounds like "Tork".
Only if there's no mass involved.
if the angular speed of an object increase its angular momentum will also increase
It is a ficticious force, which seems to push things outward from the center, when objects move in circular movement - or, more generally, in a curve.
The forces of attraction between the sun and each planet are gravitational forces, and they're both centripetal forces.
Since angular acceleration is in radians per second squared, which is change in angular speed over time, we know that α=ω/t, where α is angular acceleration, ω is angular speed, and t is time (assuming α is constant.) ω is measured in radians per second. If me multiply ω by r, which is the...
Not exactly,torque is the force that affects rotational motion; the greater the torque, the greater the change in rotational motion. It is always specified with regard to the axis of rotation.
Rotation describes the motion of an object, in a circular manner, around a fixed center point.
Torque is the rotational effect of a force. It plays the same role in rotational motion as force plays in translational motion.
Since torque is a force, and as such has a direction, it is a vector.
The force is given by :.f = m * ( v^2 / r ) , where:.f = force in newtonsm = mass in kilogramsv = rotational velocity in metres / secondr = radius to centre of gravity in metres
yes, acceleration is constant in uniform circular motion
  No, it is not. In basic physics, torque is equal to force multipled (cross multiplication in vector terms) by distance (the moment arm).
if you are riding in a car and you toss up a baseball, the baseball will come right back down no matter how fast the car is going. The same thing applies to the bullet, the earth adds velocity to the bullet. The difference is that the earth is not moving at the same speed everywhere. Near the poles,...
That is analogous to linear speed and velocity, but for rotation. Whereas a linear speed (or velocity) is expressed in meters per second (or some other units of distance / time), the angular speed or velocity is expressed in radians / second (or some other units of angle / time).Of course, when...
No, because gravity has to do with mass, not rotation. If it weren't for gravity, the rotation would cause people to fly off into space. Every object is supposed to go in a straight path forever, unless countered by another object. For example: If you have a a circle, with a small opening (_) (but...
Angular velocity is the rate of change of angle of a body, i.e. omega = v / r = (2*pi*r)/ r*t = (2*pi)/ Twhere T is the time period of whatever is rotating and r is the radius of the circle.So if a circular disc is spinning at 1 m/s then the angular velocity of it is 2*pi radians/ secondRadial...