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Tasmanian Tigers

Parent Category: Extinct Animals
Thylacines, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger or Tasmanian wolf, this creature was neither a tiger nor a wolf, but the largest carnivorous marsupial. Now believed to be extinct, it once roamed the Australian continent but, since European settlement, was known only on the Australian island of Tasmania.
They are technically extinct, but they once travelled in packs.
Tasmanian tigers were said to carry their children in pockets like  kangaroos
The Tasmanian Tiger is related to the Tasmanian Devil. It had  Kangaroo like features, too.
People assumed that they were sadistic and killed them because they  thought that they were attacking the livestock, but they actually  liked to socialize interspecially, but humans misinterpreted their  actions and therefor abused the species into extinction.
In the 1920-30's, the last one was held in captivity.
The last Thylacine (Tasmanian tiger) was captured in 1933 and then sold to the Hobart Zoo, where it died three years later.
Tasmanian Tigers lived on the Australian Continent and when people  inhabited it in 1800's then the people feared the tigers so they  hunted it to extinction. If people hadn't come, they would of  survived. Hope this helps :)
yes they tasmanian tiger was very unique and very hard to catch.  When the Europeans had settled to tasmanians their population had  been dropped
Thylacines are native to Australia, New Guinea, and Tasmania. But  its last sighting was in Mambanna, in the northeast of the states.
similar to a wolf or dog
The Tasmanian Tiger, or Thylacine as it is correctly called, is believed to be extinct. This is because its major enemy was man, who perceived it as a threat to livestock and set out on a campaign to decimate its population - a campaign that, unfortunately, succeeded. Prior to the arrival of...
millions, it was a very common animal for thousands of years, only  hunted to extinction in modern times
Yes. The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger, was a marsupial. Although not the largest marsupial (that category is taken by the Red kangaroo), it was the largest carnivorous marsupial (dasyurid).
The thylacine is the Australian marsupial commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger, or sometimes the Tasmanian wolf. It was Australia's largest carnivorous marsupial. The animal was native to Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea, and is feared extinct since 1936. Both male and female thylacines had...
100 to 130 cm long, plus a tail of around 50 to 65 cm 
up until the 20th century
it lived until the early 20th century
Same era as us, the Cenozoic era, the age of the mammals. If an animal is a mammal, they probably are from the Cenozoic. Tasmanian tigers, or thylacines, went extinct in the 1930s.
The Tasmanian tiger's proper name was the Thylacine. This creature is now extinct. The lifespan of the Thylacine was around 7 years. The longest recorded lifespan of the thylacine was 8 years and 131 days. This was achieved by a thylacine in the London Zoo in 1884..
The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936.   It was a carnivorous marsupial mammal and was hunted to extinction...
The last recorded sighting of a Tasmanian wolf, more correctly known as a Thylacine, and also as a Tasmanian tiger, was in 1936.
Believed to be extinct, the Tasmanian tiger, more properly known as the Thylacine, was unable to protect itself against humans, who literally hunted it to extinction. However, the thylacine was the largest carnivorous marsupial, and at the top of the food chain. With no natural predators, it did...
The Tasmanian wolf was more properly known as the Thylacine, and sometimes the Tasmanian tiger. This animal (Thylacinus cynocephalus) was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid. It fed on native animals such as wallabies, wombats, possums, birds and other prey smaller than itself. The Thylacine/...
I believe so. There are recent reports, photos, and videos of acreature that sounds like the Tasmanian wolves/tigers. But whoknows.
Tasmanian devils and Tasmanian tigers are two different animals. . The Tasmanian devil still exists in the wild but only onTasmania. They are on the endangered list. . The last known Tasmanian tiger died in captivity in 1936 andwas officially declared extinct in 1986. According to the Internet...
The habitat of the Tasmanian wolf, more properly known as the Thylacine or Tasmanian tiger, was open bushland such as dry eucalypt forest or grasslands or even open wetlands . From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island...
The Thylacine was a mammal, and all mammals are endothermic. Endothermic is the correct term for "warm blooded".
Like all marsupials, the Tasmanian tiger (or Thylacine) joeys were born extremely undeveloped, being small, pink, hairless and blind. At birth they bore little resemblance to the adult Thylacine, but gradually took on their characteristics as they developed in the pouch.
The thylacine is no longer dangerous, as it is believed to be extinct.When alive, it posed no danger to humans. It was a carnivorous marsupial which preyed on birds and other mammals.
  The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936.   It was a carnivorous marsupial mammal and did not have any...
  The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936.   It was a carnivorous marsupial mammal and did not have any...
"Tasmanian wolf" is a nickname for the now extinct Thylacine , or Tasmanian tiger. When they were alive, prior to the 1930s, the longest known life span of a thylacine in captivity was eight and a half years.
The correct name for the Tasmanian wolf is Thylacine. It is/was also known as the Tasmanian tiger.
The thylacine does nothing now - it has, unfortunately, been hunted to extinction by its only enemy - man. The thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian tiger, ws at the top of the food chain, feeding on other live prey.
Mammal, specifically marsupial. Tasmanian tigers or thylacines have been extinct since 1936 when the last known thylacine died at the Hobart Zoo in Tasmania, Australia.
Prior to its extinction in the 20th century, the thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, tended toward being a solitary animal, rather than a pack animal.
  The main predators of Tasmanian Tigers, now believed extinct, were human hunters (both Aboriginal but especially European) and dingoes.
No, the Tasmanian Devil and the Tasmanian Tiger (properly called a Thylacine) both occupied the top of the food chain, competing for live prey, until the Thylacine became extinct in 1936. There have been unconfirmed sightings of the thylacine, but they are probably the result of wishful thinking,...
Well,when he's little,just run around avoiding his attacks.then come in close and use close rang combat on him. Then,when he's huge, wait for him to roar,then hit his tail. Oh yeah, when he's small, only the shadow chassis can hurt him, but you can hurt him with any rang.
Thylacine is the correct name for the Tasmanian tiger, although it was also called the Tasmanian wolf, due to its wolf-like features. The Tasmanian tiger was prevalent in Tasmania until European settlement, when farmers hunted it to extinction, fearing it was a threat to their livestock. The last...
Tasmanian tigers, more properly known as thylacines , are now extinct and are therefore not eaten by anything. Prior to their extinction, thylacines were at the top of their food chain, and therefore not subject to predation by any species, except when very young.
The Tasmanian tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, was known up until 1936. This is when the last known Thylacine died in captivity. There have been no confirmed sightings since then. It was one of the biggest carnivorous marsupials, and native to Australia and New Guinea.
The Thylacine's scientific name is Thylacinus cynocephalus, and it is from this that the marsupial gained its common name. The genus Thylacinus was derived from the modern Latin Thylacinus (genus name), which came from the Greek thulakos, meaning 'pouch'. Both males and females had a pouch: the...
No. Thylacines were solitary animals. Fossil evidence indicates they lived and hunted alone, not in packs.
It didn't. The last of the thylacines died out before official protection for Australian native wildlife was brought in. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo in 1936. Its needs were not understood and it was believed to have died of exposure.
Never more than 60 degrees as this is the point where it would dislocate. Figures given of 90 or even 120 degrees are totally unfounded and, like so much of what's reported about the thylacine, should be totally ignored.
The Tasmanian wolf, more correctly known as the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, is beyond endangered - it is now extinct . Its extinction occurred because the government put a bounty on the capture and killing of these creatures, believing them to be a threat to livestock.
Unfortunately, too little, too late, was done to protect the Tasmanian tiger. In fact, a bounty was placed on the Tasmanian tiger as farmers feared than as a threat to livestock. The Tasmanian government did not act to protect the Thylacine (as it was properly called) until 1936, the same year as...
Yes. The Tasmanian wolf and Tasmanian tiger are both alternative names for the marsupial properly known as the Thylacine.
The habitat of the thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian tiger, was open bushland such as dry eucalypt forest or grasslands or even open wetlands . From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. However,...
The Tasmanian tiger, more properly known as the Thylacine, is extinct. However, it was believed to be nocturnal.
The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, was at the top of the food chain. It had no native predators. The reason it went extinct from the Australian mainland was because of increased competition for food once the Aborigines introduced the dingo. When Europeans settled Tasmania, they actively hunted this...
From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. This is its last known location, and official extinction status by international standards was declared in 1986.   However, fossil evidence from a long time ago...
The Tasmanian tiger is a part of history because it is no longer alive. More properly known as the Thylacine, it was a carnivorous marsupial predator (or dasyurid ) that lived in the Australian island state of Tasmania. It was similar to a dog and is believed to now be extinct, although there are...
The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger (though not related to tigers at all) became extinct because the European settlers saw it as a threat to their livestock and petitioned for a bounty to be placed on it. This enabled them to freely hunt the animal, leading directly to its extinction.
Thylacines were not related to kangaroos beyond being marsupials. Thylacines, or Tasmanian Tigers, were dasyurids, or carnivorous marsupials while kangaroos are herbivorous macropods (big-footed marsupials).
From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. However, fossil evidence from a long time ago indicates they once also lived on the Australian mainland and in New Guinea. The habitat of the thylacine was open...
The Tasmanian tiger is now extinct. From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. However, fossil evidence from a long time ago indicates they once also lived on the Australian mainland and in New Guinea. The...
On ZT2 get a thylacine. It has to be angry or be running and  attacking guests to gape. When it's happy, it rarely gapes. The  closest thing to gaping when it's happy is when it yawns. Hope this  helps!
There was no specific name for the female Thylacine.
The last known specimen of the Tasmanian Tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, died in the Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936 .
Apart from the Thylacine and the quagga, mammals which haverecently become extinct include: . Gould's Mouse . White-footed Rabbit rat . Toolache wallaby . Eastern Hare wallaby . Central Hare wallaby . Broad-faced Potoroo . Lesser bilby . Southern Bettong . Pig-footed Bandicoot . Darling Downs...
As the last specimen probably died unobserved in the wild sometime during the latter part of the Twentieth Century it's not possible to say. The last captive specimen, erroneously reported as being a female called Benjamin but actually an unnamed male, died on the concrete floor of its enclosure on...
The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine , was a dasyurid which is a carnivorous marsupial.
The Tasmanian Tiger (properly called a Thylacine) occupied the top of the food chain, competing with the Tasmanian Devil for live prey, until the Thylacine became extinct in 1936.
You cannot find a Thylacine anywhere, as the last known specimen died in 1936. From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. However, fossil evidence from a long time ago indicates they once also lived on the...
The last known specimen of the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, died in the Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936.
The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, (sometimes also called a Tasmanian wolf) is now extinct. It was about 100cm-110cm in length, with its strong, stiff tail half the length of its body again. It stood about 60cm tall at shoulder height. Its fur was grey-brown (not orange, as sometimes depicted),...
There are not, nor have ever been, Tasmanian tigers in Florida. Fossil evidence indicates that Tasmanian tigers only lived in the continent of Australia and part of New Guinea.
The Tasmanian wolf, or Thylacine, (also called a Tasmanian tiger) had grey-brown fur (not orange, as sometimes depicted), and it had up to 16 black or brown stripes on its back, predominantly at the tail end. Although it moved on four legs, it had strong hind legs shaped a little like those of a...
Over the course of Western contact with the species many were kept in zoos. The last individual held outside Australia died in London Zoo in 1931, while the last ever captive specimen died in Hobart in 1936. Both are recorded on film. One of the many modern myths that has built up around the animal...
The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, was believed to weigh between 20 and 30 kg.
Given that Tasmanian tigers are now extinct, this is not a problem. Nor was it ever a problem. The Tasmanian tiger, more properly known as the Thylacine, was a carnivorous marsupial, but it posed absolutely no threat to humans.
The Tasmanian Tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, has not been seen since the last known specimen died in September 1936. However, for a species to be declared extinct, fifty years must pass since a confirmed sighting. Therefore, the Thylacine was declared extinct by national standards in...
The Tasmanian Tiger or Wolf was neither a tiger nor a wolf, but instead its own unique species of marsupial that is now extinct. The correct name for the Tasmanian Tiger is Thylacine. It was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid, like the Tasmanian Devil, although recent research suggests it was most...
yes there has been reports of small groups of thylacine, in the nortern glacial regions of Narnia.
The Thylacine was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it, as farmers were concerned about the loss of their livestock. Scientists have also recently proven that, prior to its extinction, the Thylacine had limited genetic diversity. There is every chance that, were Thylacines still in...
Posthumously these days. Up until the 1930s, though, the females had a rear facing pouch with four nipples, though as with so many things with the thylacine what the average number of young produced was is unknown, however two separate sources Gunn and Owen from the Nineteenth Century each give an...
The Thylacine's best defence was its sharp teeth, and its ability to run quickly.
Yes. The Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, was a carnivorous marsupial, of the dasyurid family.
Well, Yes If we find some droppings of it or a hair from it we can use its DNA to bring it back to life though all of the ones brang back to life will have the same personality, behavior etc. By the way i don't think this animal is extinct!
Tasmanian tigers, more properly known as Thylacines, were warm-blooded, like all mammals.
Tasmanian tigers, more properly known as Thylacines, are extinct, so they do not live anywhere now. From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. However, fossil evidence from a long time ago indicates they once...
The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and Tasmanian Wolf, became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936.There is highly disputed evidence that a very small number may yet still exist in the Tasmanian wilderness, but...
The Thylacine (Tasmanian tiger) did not hate the Tasmanian devil. Tasmanian Devil and the Thylacine both occupied the top of the food chain, competing for live prey, until the Thylacine became extinct in 1936.
No. Scientific and fossil evidence indicates the Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, was a solitary animal that lived and hunted alone.
It is thought maybe due to overhunting or competition from dingoes, but there's not really much information. It actually could still be out there, but as far as we know, it's extinct. Also, possibly due to competition from other animals, many of them introduced and destruction of habitat. The...
The Tasmanian wolf, more properly known as the Thylacine, and sometimes also called the Tasmanian tiger, was in existence up until 1936.