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Tasmanian Tigers

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Parent Category: Extinct Animals
Thylacines, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger or Tasmanian wolf, this creature was neither a tiger nor a wolf, but the largest carnivorous marsupial. Now believed to be extinct, it once roamed the Australian continent but, since European settlement, was known only on the Australian island of Tasmania.
It could be argued that the Tasmanian Wolf (more properly known as the Thylacine) has failed to adapt to its surroundings - it is now believed to be extinct.Surf on over to the nice article (with good pics) posted by our friends at Wikipedia and have a read. It'll be worth it. A link is provided to …
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This is subject to some debate. Generally, most authorities consider the Tasmanian tiger extinct, but there are persistent unconfirmed reports of sightings, both in Tasmania and in nearby parts of the Australian mainland. This animal is also known as the Tasmanian wolf, or the thylacine. On the news…
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The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on 7 September 1936. It was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it as a livestock killer…
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The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, is no longer living anywhere, as far as is known. It was found in Australia, specifically on the island state of Tasmania, although ancient fossil remains have also been found on the mainland. It was not a tiger, but a striped marsupial. Believed to be extinct sin…
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The correct name for the Tasmanian wolf is Thylacine. It is also known as the Tasmanian tiger. This marsupial was, of course, discovered by indigenous Australians centuries ago. This is known through ancient cave paintings. In 1642 Abel Tasman became the first to make note of the Thylacine. He reco…
Popularity: 18
The correct name for the Tasmanian tiger is Thylacine. It is also known as the Tasmanian wolf. This marsupial was, of course, discovered by indigenous Australians centuries ago. This is known through ancient cave paintings. In 1642 Abel Tasman became the first to make note of the Thylacine. He reco…
Popularity: 3
The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936. It was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it as a livesto…
Popularity: 32
The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf, became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936. It was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it as a livestoc…
Popularity: 17
The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), designated extinct in 1986, had an exclusively carnivorous diet. Its stomach was muscular and has the ability to digest large amounts of food at one time. This is thought to have allowed the …
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The Thylacine, was a carnivorous marsupial predator (or dasyurid) that lived in the Australian island state of Tasmania. Quite different from the Tasmanian devil, which still exists, it was similar in size and appearance to a dog (although entirely unrelated) and is believed to now be extinct, altho…
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The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936. It was a carnivorous marsupial mammal and was hunted to extinction afte…
Popularity: 6
The Tasmanian wolf was more properly known as the Thylacine, and sometimes the Tasmanian tiger. This animal (Thylacinus cynocephalus) was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid. It fed on native animals such as wallabies, wombats, possums, birds and other prey smaller than itself. The Thylacine/ Tasm…
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No, the Tasmanian Devil and the Tasmanian Tiger (properly called a Thylacine) both occupied the top of the food chain, competing for live prey, until the Thylacine became extinct in 1936. There have been unconfirmed sightings of the thylacine, but they are probably the result of wishful thinking, an…
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The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger (though not related to tigers at all) became extinct because the European settlers saw it as a threat to their livestock and petitioned for a bounty to be placed on it. This enabled them to freely hunt the animal, leading directly to its extinction.
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From the time of European settlement, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was only known on the Australian island state of Tasmania. However, fossil evidence from a long time ago indicates they once also lived on the Australian mainland and in New Guinea. The habitat of the thylacine was open bushla…
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Well, Yes If we find some droppings of it or a hair from it we can use its DNA to bring it back to life though all of the ones brang back to life will have the same personality, behavior etc. By the way i don't think this animal is extinct!
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The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and Tasmanian Wolf, became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936.There is highly disputed evidence that a very small number may yet still exist in the Tasmanian wilderness, but no…
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For safety, the Thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, tended to remain in the underbrush and dense bushland. Unfortunately, this was not enough to secure it against man's incessant need to hunt and destroy.
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The earliest description of evidence of the existence of the Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, came when Abel Tasman first landed on Tasmania in 1642. Dutch crewman Jacobszoon who was aboard Abel Tasman's ship was one of several crew who explored the island, described seeing "footprints not ill-resembl…
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The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine (sometimes erroneously called the Tasmanian wolf), lived in dry eucalyptus forests and grasslands of the Australian continent, the island state of Tasmania, and parts of New Guinea. From the time of European settlement in Australia, this animal was only ever known …
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The Thylacine was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it, as farmers were concerned about the loss of their livestock. Scientists have also recently proven that, prior to its extinction, the Thylacine had limited genetic diversity. There is every chance that, were Thylacines still in…
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The Tasmanian tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid. It fed on native animals such as wallabies, wombats, possums, birds and other prey smaller than itself. The Thylacine sometimes scavenged for food, and was known to feed on the carcasses of rabbits…
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The thylacine had fur, was warm-blooded, fed its young with milk, and gave live birth, making it a mammal. The thylacine gave birth to its young very undeveloped, so they had to attach to the mother's nipple, after being born, in order to gain the necessary nutrients. The thylacine had a pouch in …
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It is Thylacinus cynocephalus. The Thylacine (also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and somtimes the Tasmanian Wolf, became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936. It was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it as a li…
Popularity: 3
The Tasmanian wolf was also more properly known as the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger. It was about 100cm-110cm in length, with its strong, stiff tail half the length of its body again. It stood about 60cm tall at shoulder height.
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The Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) was hunted almost to extinction due to its threat to livestock such as sheep and poultry. They were protected by law before it was too late in June 1941 from where their numbers recovered sufficiently for them to be classified as "secure". More recently, th…
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The Thylacine (also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and somtimes the Tasmanian Wolf), was a carnivorous marsupial mammal which became extinct during the 20th century. It was neither a tiger nor a wolf.The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936.
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The subjunctive is one of three moods in which verbs are conjugated (the others being indicative and imperative). It is used when expressing hope, fear, uncertainty, necessity, doubt, and other similar states. It is falling out of use in colloquial speech, though still used in formal circumstances.E…
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the largest known tiger in 1994 weighed 118.53 kgs
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The Tasmanian wolf is more correctly known as the Thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger. The last known specimen of the Thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in September 1936.
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No. The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936. It was a carnivorous marsupial mammal and did not have any natural …
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The Tasmanian Tiger is thought to be extinct. As they were marsupials, the young were called joeys.The Tasmanian tiger was not a tiger nor a wolf (although sometimes being called a Tasmanian wolf); therefore the young were not called cubs or pups.
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The Thylacine (also known as the Tasmanian Tiger and sometimes the Tasmanian Wolf), became extinct during the 20th century. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo on the 7th of September, 1936. It was hunted to extinction after a bounty was placed on it as a livestock killer. There is dispu…
Popularity: 4
The Thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger (Thylacinus cynocephalus), was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid. It fed on native animals such as wallabies, wombats, possums, birds and other prey smaller than itself. The Thylacine sometimes scavenged for food, and was known to feed on the carcasses of rabbits…
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An animal cannot be both extinct and endangered.The Tasmanian tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, is extinct.
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Being an extinct animal, it no longer sounds like anything at all.More properly known as the Thylacine, this creature was only ever heard to make light "yipping" noises, and then fairly rarely.
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delta forcecombatsthundercats
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Farmers believed the Tasmanian Wolf to be a threat to their livestock so they hired bounty hunters to hunt and kill it. Soon they became extinct.
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The Tasmanian tiger is not a tiger, but a carnivorous marsupial (dasyurid), more correctly known as the Thylacine. It was never endangered, as the various conservation status levels were not in force before it became extinct. It was moved to "extinct" status as a result of being hunted as a possible…
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The Thylacine was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid. It fed on native animals such as wallabies, wombats, possums, birds and other prey smaller than itself. The Thylacine sometimes scavenged for food, and was known to feed on the carcasses of rabbits and wallabies.
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That would be the Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian tiger.
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Thylacinus cynocephalusNote that this is the scientific name for the Thylacine, which is also sometimes known as the Tasmanian tiger or, erroneously, the Tasmanian wolf.
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The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger, was not an endangered species in Tasmania at that time (1909), but it was very rare on the Australian mainland. Many people currently believe the animal is not extinct at all due to recent, but so far inconclusive, potential evidence on video.
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Distantly related. They are both carnivorous marsupials. The Tasmanian Devil's closest living relative is the quoll.
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In common with the other predatory marsupials, the thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, had a very powerful bite with respect to its body size. Among mammals, only two others, both marsupials, are more powerful: the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophillis harrisii) and the quoll (Dasyurus maculata). The thylacine i…
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Yes - but they are now extinct. The correct name for the Tasmanian Tiger was Thylacine, and they were a distant relative of the Tasmanian devil and the numbat. They were once found all over the Australian continent, but by the time Europeans settled in Australia, they were only known in Tasmania. Th…
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The last one died in 1936. They became extinct because of competition for food with the Dingo. Correction: The Thylacine only competed with the dingo for food on the mainland of Australia, and even this theory is now being doubted by scientists. The dingo has never reached Tasmania, so was no threat…
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First, they are not a canines, they are marsupials. Their proper name is Thylacine, Tasmanian tiger or Tasmanian wolf, but never "thylacine wolf". Second, Tasmanian farmers wiped them out because they believed the animals were a threat to their livestock, and a bounty was placed on the thylacine. …
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The correct name for the Tasmanian Tiger is Thylacine. It was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid, like the Tasmanian Devil, although recent research suggests it was most closely related to the numbat than the Tasmanian Devil. The Tasmanian Tiger, also known as the Tasmanian Wolf, was native to Tas…
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The "Tasmanian Wolf" was not a wolf, or even a member of the Canidae family. It was a marsupial predator more closely related to kangaroos than any wolf. It has also been extinct since the 1930s, and even when it was alive there were never any wolves on the Australian continent or in Tasmania. It ma…
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The Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, was formerly found in Australia, both the mainland and Tasmania. However, from the time of European settlement it was only found in Tasmania. Fossil evidence indicates it once lived on the mainland, and also the island of New Guinea.
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The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, was about 100cm-110cm in length, with its tail half the length of its body again. The largest measured specimen was 9.5 ft from nose to tail (289cm - just short of 3 m). Adults stood about 40-60 cm at the shoulder and weighed 15-30 kilograms, or 33 to 66 lb. The m…
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No. Scientific and fossil evidence indicates the Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, was a solitary animal that lived and hunted alone.Suggestions have been made that the Thylacine hunted in packs for larger prey, but this is only a theory.
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It is said that the last Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, which died in a Hobart zoo in 1936, died partially from starvation and partially from exposure. Not enough was known about the needs of this native marsupial, and it was, quite simply, not cared for properly.
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The Tasmanian tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, has been extinct since 1936.
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Coenraad Jacob Temminck, in 1824.
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First of all, the animal to which the questioner is referring to is actually called a Tasmanian Devil, it's ferocious and aggressive personality having earned it its name. Devil cubs are furless and naked at birth, with a pinkish color skin. Other than that, they are exactly like their parents in sh…
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The correct name for the Tasmanian wolf is Thylacine. Also known as the Tasmanian tiger (and not to be confused with the Tasmanian devil), there is no collective name for a group of thylacines. These animals are solitary, so groups of thylacines were unknown. However, given the fact that they were c…
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They were born just like other mammals and marsupials.
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There is no such creature as a Tasmanian tiger-wolf. Its proper name is Thylacine, and its nickname is Tasmanian Tiger or Tasmanian wolf, neither of which is correct, because it was a marsupial. It was not related to either tigers or wolves.Because the Thylacine was a marsupial, the female had a pou…
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The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, (sometimes also called a Tasmanian wolf) was about 100cm-110cm in length, with its strong, stiff tail half the length of its body again. It stood about 60cm tall at shoulder height. Its fur was grey-brown (not orange, as sometimes depicted), and it had up to 16 bl…
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The Tasmanian Tiger, or Thylacine as it is correctly called, is believed to be extinct. This is because its major enemy was man, who perceived it as a threat to livestock and set out on a campaign to decimate its population - a campaign that, unfortunately, succeeded. Prior to the arrival of Europe…
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Baby Tasmanian tigers were called joeys. The Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, was a marsupial, and all marsupial young are called joeys.They were not even remotely related to tigers, so the word "cubs" did not apply.
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The Thylacine, also known as the Tasmanian tiger or Tasmanian wolf, was last seen in Tasmania in 1936. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo, and no more have been sighted in the wild.
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The Tasmanian wolf, more correctly known as the Thylacine, or Tasmanian Tiger, is now extinct. Its extinction occurred because the government put a bounty on the capture and killing of these creatures, believing them to be a threat to livestock.
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The correct name for the Tasmanian tiger is Thylacine. It is also known as the Tasmanian wolf. This marsupial was, of course, discovered by indigenous Australians centuries ago. This is known through ancient cave paintings. In 1642 Abel Tasman became the first to make note of the Thylacine. He reco…
Popularity: 2
The Tasmanian wolf is more correctly known as the Thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger. It is believed to be extinct. The Tasmanian wolf was not a wolf. It was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid, and found only in Tasmania. there is fossil evidence to suggest it once roamed the Australian mainland, and …
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normally described as 'pungent' The last Tasmanian Tiger (more properly known as the Thylacine) died in 1936. No descriptions exist regarding what they smelled like. Tasmanian tigers are often confused with Tasmanian devils, which are known to emit a foul odour in defence.
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No. Tasmanian tigers only lived in the continent of Australia and part of New Guinea.
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No. Evidence indicates tht the Tasmanian Tiger, or Thylacine, was a solitary animal, living and hunting alone.
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Unfortunately there wasn't anyone trying to protect them. In fact, a bounty was placed on the Tasmanian tiger as farmers feared than as a threat to livestock. The Tasmanian government did not act to protect the Thylacine (as it was properly called) until 1936, the same year as its apparent extincti…
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The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, was believed to bear around three young, once a year, during the winter-spring breeding season. As she had four teats, the female could carry up to four young in her pouch. The pouch could expand to the size where, with nearly-grown young in it, it would reach almo…
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It doesn't. The Tasmanian Tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, is believed to be extinct. This animal was unable to protect itself against humans, who literally hunted it to extinction. However, the Thylacine was the largest carnivorous marsupial, and at the top of the food chain. With no …
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The last known Tasmanian tiger died in a Tasmanian zoo in 1936
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opal is the point of the game
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The tiger is not a marsupial. It is a placvental mammal.The now-extinct "Tasmanian tiger" was a marsupial, but it was not a member of the tiger family. Its real name was "thylacine" and it was only given the designation of Tasmanian tiger because of its stripes.
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The Tasmanian wolf, more correctly known as the Thylacine (and also the Tasmanian tiger) was a dasyurid, or carnivorous marsupial. As such, it was an apex predator, and at the top of the food chain.
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The status of the Tasmanian tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, has gone beyond being endangered. It is believed to be extinct. The last known specimen died in 1936.
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The Tasmanian tiger (Thylacine) is now extinct. It had fur that was grey-brown (not orange, as sometimes depicted) and ranging from a greyish rabbit-like colour, or sandy to chocolate brown. The coat colour was modified by white flashes on the face, below the eyes and on the muzzle, as well as a whi…
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The Tasmanian tiger is not a tiger, but a carnivorous marsupial (dasyurid), more correctly known as the Thylacine. It was never endangered, as the various conservation status levels were not in force before it became extinct. It was moved to "extinct" status as a result of being hunted as a possible…
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The list is absolutely extraordinarily long. There are millions of types of animals that can no longer be found, anywhere, today. Think of the Dinosaurs, the Dodo, prehistoric humans, ice-age mammals like the Mammoth, and more modern animals that have been wiped out by human intervention, like the …
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There are no known Tasmanian Tigers, or Thylacines, still in existence. The last one is believed to have died in the Hobart Zoo in 1936.
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The last Tasmanian wolf, also known as the Tasmanian Tiger but properly known as the Thylacine, died in 1936. No descriptions exist regarding what they smelled like. Tasmanian tigers are often confused with Tasmanian devils, which are known to emit a foul odour in defence.
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The breeding season for the Tasmanian tiger, more properly known as the Thylacine, was believed to be from winter to spring, although there are some indication that breeding may have taken place throughout the year. Little is known about this creature, which has been extinct since 1936.
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Tasmanian Wolves are extinct, but to answer the question, no, they are marsupials.Note: The correct name for the Tasmanian wolf is Thylacine.
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Diseases did not kill the Tasmanian tiger. Man did. Human beings hunted them to extinction. While it's true that humans had a devastating impact on the Thylacine, during the early Twentieth Century wild populations were ravaged by a disease similar to Canine Distemper, this also eventually found its…
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One pound for each adult; ten shillings for each pup.
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The Tasmanian Tiger (more correctly known as the Thylacine) was hunted to extinction because farmers were concerned about the threat to their livestock. The last one died in the Hobart Zoo because the needs of this animal were not understood, and they were not given sufficient shelter for the cold c…
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No, they were genetically closer to the kangaroo than to the dog. They are now extinct. The Tasmanian Tiger was a dasyurid, a carnivorous marsupial, and the largest dasyurid in Australia. It bore no relation to any member of the canine family.
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The Tasmanian tiger, or Thylacine, which is now extinct, was about 100cm-110cm in length, with its tail half the length of its body again. The largest measured specimen was reported to be 9.5 ft from nose to tail (289cm - just short of 3 m). Whether or not this is true is a matter of some debate.Ad…
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The Thylacine was a carnivorous marsupial, or dasyurid. It fed on native animals such as wallabies, wombats, possums, birds and other prey smaller than itself. The Thylacine sometimes scavenged for food, and was known to feed on the carcasses of rabbits and wallabies.
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Thylacines have officially been pronounced extinct, however there are still some alleged sightings in remote places of Australia. This might be mistaken identity, or the Thylacine may still be alive, but most likely the former.
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Baby thylacines stayed in their mother's pouch for about three months before leaving. They would then stay in the den while the mother hunted for several more months.
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The Tasmanian tiger, more correctly known as the Thylacine, was declared extinct by international standards, as stated by the Tasmanian government, in 1986The last known specimen of the Thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in September 1936. Since then, there have been many unconfirmed sightings, but be…
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It doesn't. The Tasmanian wolf, more properly known as the Thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger, is believed to be extinct. The last known specimen died in the Hobart Zoo in 1936.Before becoming extinct, the Thylacine had the same reproductive characteristics as other marsupials. The young joeys were born v…
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The extinction of the Tasmanian wolf, more correctly known as the Thylacine (and also known as the Tasmanian tiger), in Tasmania was directly a result of European settlement. Farmers were concerned the animal was a threat to livestock, so they petitioned for a bounty to be placed on it, allowing the…
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