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Repossession

Can the lender charge any amount he wants to for the repossession fee to get your car back?

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2011-09-12 16:04:00
2011-09-12 16:04:00

Not ANY, but it can vary. Most contracts just say "fees", amount not specified. Of course, 10K wouldn't stand up in any court.

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On the surface, no. As long as you have not defaulted on the loan contract, there is no reason for repossession. The lender wants your money, not your car.

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I cant, you might can IF you pay current. The lender wants their money, on time, blah blah blah. SOS different day, LOL Yes, they have to give your car back if you pay the reinstatement ammount, in other words all the payments and fees you owe to make the loan current... the only exception will be if they have a reason to believe that you hide your vehicle to avoid repossession....in that case they have the right to refuse the monthly payments, and they will ask for the full payoff amount to give your car back, if they have not sold it yet...

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Bankruptcy does not prevent a vehicle from being repossessed. If the debtor/borrower wants to keep the vehicle they must reaffirm the loan with the lender. Furthermore, new bankruptcy laws require the borrower to repay the entire amount of the loan and applicable fees rather than the discrepancy between the loan and the amount recovered in the sale of the vehicle.

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Paid repossession would be the best option. This, even though it is a negative mark, is less so due to the satisfaction of the debt. Count yourself fortunate, as the lender could list it as paid-settlement, which would be less positive.

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You can make an offer in any state. Its up to the lender to accept or reject it. Has the lender tried to work with you on payments already and it didnt work out?At this state of the game, the lender wants more than promises. They want MONEY NOW. The more the better. They can get 25% of your disposable income by garnishment so why would they settle for less in an offer? Its time to get serious about paying this debt. Good Luck


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