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  • World War 1
  • History of Australia
  • New Zealand History

Did the conditions at Gallipoli lead to the creation of the ANZAC Legend?

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βˆ™ 2011-05-30 08:42:16

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Very much so.

ANZAC means Australia and New Zealand Armed Corps. The original Anzacs were the soldiers who landed at Gallipoli on Turkish Aegean coast, on 25 April 1915. The legend is borne of the stories of their bravery, loyalty, selflessness, feats of endurance and mateship through an horrific time: a time which Australians really had not faced previously.

Conditions in the trenches were horrible. As men died, their bodies became maggot-infested, and the stench was unbearable. Yet the soldiers fought on, not questioning their orders, but steadfastly following what they had been told to do.

Of particular importance is the story of Simpson and his donkey. Simpson landed at Anzac Cove on 25 April 1915 and, from the first night, took a donkey (or possibly donkeys) that had been landed for one of the field artillery units, and began carrying wounded soldiers from the battle line to the beach for evacuation. Leading the donkey, which he variously named Duffy or Murphy, he began his journeys from the beach, up Shrapnel Gully and then Monash Valley. He carried water on his way and wounded on his way back. Simpson continued this for three and a half weeks, disregarding the danger until, on the morning of 19 May 1915, he was killed by Turkish machine gun fire near Steele's Post, as he was returning down Monash Valley with a wounded man. The donkey continued on the well-worn track, obediently carrying the wounded man to where he would be tended. It is interesting to note that, some time after Simpson was killed, a New Zealand primary school teacher by the name of Richard Henderson took over Simpson's work, guiding the donkeys while they carried wounded men to safety. The story of Simpson, therefore, does not belong to Australia alone.

CEW Bean was the Australian official war correspondent, and later official war historian of the time. He landed with the ANZACs at Gallipoli, and his writings contributed significantly to the development and growth of the ANZAC legend. His detailed reports on the landing and subsequent battle/s provided a unique and personal perspective on the events.

2011-05-30 08:42:16
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Related Questions

What aspects of the ANZAC legend are reinforced in the film Gallipoli?

Some aspects of the ANZAC legend displayed in the film Gallipoli include:mateshiployaltycourage under fire


What year did the ANZAC campaign commence?

There was no ANZAC campaign. Presuming that "ANZAC campaign" refers to the Gallipoli campaign, where the ANZAC legend was born, this occurred in 1915. To be precise, the Gallipoli campaign began in the early hours of 25 April 1915, and continued for around eight months.


Where did the anzac lands there ships in gallipoli?

at Gallipoli dumby


How did anzac solders get to gallipoli?

By ship.


Where did the ANZAC land at?

They landed at Gallipoli


Where did the ANZACs land?

The ANZAC soldiers landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula on the Turkish Aegean coast.


What is the connection between the Anzac cove and Gallipoli?

Anzac Cove is where the Anzacs fought in Gallipoli, they set up their trenches there and basically lived there


When did the ANZAC troops leave Gallipoli?

The ANZAC troops were evacuated from Gallipoli eight months after the initial landing which occurred on 25 April 1915.


What were the conditions like at gallipoli on the landing beach?

The conditions was very humid and hot when they landed at Anzac Cove. There where steep, jagged cliffs and long bumpy mountains.


How did the ANZAC soldiers travel to Gallipoli?

by boat


Where did the Anzac s sail from to get to gallipoli?

egypt


Why is Gallipoli significant?

Because it is where ANZAC fought


When and where was the Anzac invasion of Galipoli?

Gallipoli 1915.


Why is the beach at Gallipoli called?

Anzac cove


Why is the anzac symbol a flower?

The ANZAC symbol is a flower because rosemary is found in Gallipoli.


In what Turkish region were the ANZAC troops landed in 1915?

The ANZAC troops landed in Gallipoli.


How long were Australian soldiers in Gallipoli?

The ANZAC campaign in Gallipoli lasted for eight months.


Is the ANZAC legend valid?

Yes, it has been proven as valid. Many historians and scholars have researched the validity and accuracy of the story of Gallipoli and it remains true.


What is the concept of the ANZAC legend?

The Anzac legend is sticking by your friends no matter how bad things are going. Looking after each other rather than looking out for ones self. Embedded in the ANZAC legend is the concept of mateship. The ANZAC legend comprises the stories of incredible bravery and mateship which helped the diggers survive the horrors of Gallipoli. The legend is made of the qualities that last, and qualities we wish we could always see enacted around us - selflessness, loyalty, etc. The ANZAC day legend isn't one specific thing. It is about the general courage of Australian and New Zealand forces who have fought in all the wars since WW1.


Where was the battle remembered on ANZAC Day?

ANZAC Day commemorates the landing of the ANZAC troops at Gallipoli on the Turkish Aegean coast.


Who stated the ANZAC war?

There was no such thing as the "ANZAC war". It was part of World War One and called the Gallipoli Campaign. Technically the British did when they landed troops at Gallipoli.


What were the fighting condition like in Gallipoli?

The Conditions in Gallipoli were very rough and unfair. The Turks outnumbered the ANZACs and were on higher ground. They surrounded the ANZAC soldiers making there no where to hide. Even if you were behind a bush or rock you would still get shot dead. Many of the ANZAC soldiers were also inexperienced.


How many anzac soldiers died at gallipoli?

about 11,000


What did the ANZAC carry when they were taken to Gallipoli?

guns guns


ANZAC troops fight in which country?

They fought in Gallipoli