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How do you put together the best case for relocation of a custodial parent?

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2006-01-28 01:32:38
2006-01-28 01:32:38

Are you the custodial parent? Will you be moving close to your family? If this relocation is for a job and to better your self for the best interest of your kids then that is pretty easy for a court to be in your favor. Or for personal reasons like safety issues I would continue your issues in another location. Good Luck with your situation and the best to you!

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Of course. The custodial parent should know where the child will be when she is with the non-custodial parent. If something should happen to the non-custodial parent the custodial parent should know where to get the child. Wanting to keep that type of information secret shows a problem of non-cooperation and a parent who is not thinking of the best interests of the child.

No. Only the court can enter an order of temporary custody. With the non-custodial parent incarcerated and with the consent of the custodial parent the court would likely approve a temporary guardianship that is in the best interest of the child.

The biological parents should attempt to work together amicably for the best of their children. When the non-custodial parent has visitation time, and they are re-married, chances are that the children may be spending time alone with the step-parent and it can be in the child's best interest for there to be open dialogue.

No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.

A custodial parent who is contemplating any move that would interfere with the non-custodial parent's custodial and visitation rights must return to court to seek a new custodial and/or visitation agreement. Courts view this issue with the focus being on the child's best interests and that includes the importance of having access and time with both parents. This issue is viewed not as permission for the parent to move but for permission to move the child. See links for more information.http://www.writerlaw.com/every-custodial-parent-needs-know-california-move-away-law/https://www.divorcenet.com/resources/child-custody-and-relocation-laws-california.html

You should share your plans with the custodial parents for your child's sake. If there is an emergency, it's best that everyone knows how to make contact.

Yes. If the non custodial parent is denied visitation as outlined in the court order than the custodial parent is in contempt. Perhaps you should also establish a neutral exchange site and request the each parent notify the other parent within 48hrs any change in address or phone number. The custodial parent should know where the child will be when she is with the non-custodial parent. If something should happen to the non-custodial parent the custodial parent should know where to get the child. Wanting to keep that type of information secret shows a problem of non-cooperation and a parent who is not thinking of the best interests of the child.

No. Losing your job is not in and of itself grounds for losing custody of your child. The parent who wants to gain custody would need to file a motion for custody and convince the court that the custodial parent is unfit and that it would be in the best interest of the child to award custody to the other parent.

Yes, of course. The custodial parent is entitled to anyrecord concerning the child. Many non-custodial parents provide insurance coverage. That does not bar the parent with custody from the child's medical records. That wouldn't make sense and would be counter productive to the best interest of the child.Yes, of course. The custodial parent is entitled to anyrecord concerning the child. Many non-custodial parents provide insurance coverage. That does not bar the parent with custody from the child's medical records. That wouldn't make sense and would be counter productive to the best interest of the child.Yes, of course. The custodial parent is entitled to anyrecord concerning the child. Many non-custodial parents provide insurance coverage. That does not bar the parent with custody from the child's medical records. That wouldn't make sense and would be counter productive to the best interest of the child.Yes, of course. The custodial parent is entitled to anyrecord concerning the child. Many non-custodial parents provide insurance coverage. That does not bar the parent with custody from the child's medical records. That wouldn't make sense and would be counter productive to the best interest of the child.

Yes. Many states require that the custodial parent petition the court and the judge can determine if it is in the child's best interest to relocate the child out of state.

You would have to show that he is an unfit parent, and that it is in the best interest of the child for the mother to be the custodial parent.

It depends on what kind of custody arrangements you have. If you have joint legal custody, you both have to decide together what is best for the children. If you do not want the child to have a tattoo, the non-custodial parent should not allow the child to have it done and you can file contempt charges if they do.

if a non custodial parent reuses to sign a passport the only option is court. A judge can decide if it is in the best interests of the child to leave the country.

I'm guessing that you are the custodial parent, and you are wondering what you can do to get the non-custodial parent to make enough money to help pay for the expenses of your child? The technical answer to your question is, "Yes, a non custodial parent CAN avoid working..." However, there may be consequences for the dead-beat parent that s/he won't like. If you can show that the non-custodial parent is intentionally neglecting his/her responsibilities, the court will be able to take certain measures against the dead-beat parent. You need to consult with a family-law attorney, and it is usually best if you use the same attorney who handled your original custodial agreement. If you cannot afford an attorney, there are free legal services in every state.

Unless there is a court order which prevents the non-custodial parent from having access to the child, then you should not deny the visitation unless you have absolute proof that allowing visitation is a danger to your child. It's best to speak to a lawyer and find out about modifying any current custodial order that may already be in place if necessary.

Yes. Child custody is decided on what's best for the child. So if its best for the child to go with him/her, then that is what the judge will decide. * It's possible, but the non custodial parent will still have to be notified of the proceedings and given the opportunity to object to the act. Considering the cited circumstances that hardly seems fair, but it is, in the US the law.

The greater question is WHAT'S IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE CHILD?

Well actually, it depends. A non-custodial parent can still have liberal, defined visitation and if that parent, say has 3 days a week or every weekend, and their income is vastly lower than the income of the custodial parent then there would be an avenue in many states where that 'non-custodial' parent would be entitled to child support. Again, it would vary on a number of factors including what you mean by non-custodial. If non-custodial includes no physical or legal custody and/or no visitation at all, the avenue seems virtually impossible. However, simply being non-custodial would not be the single defining point. In fact, there wouldn't be a single variable that would determine the answer to this question (particularly as state law were weighed in). Best advice, contact an attorney, many will provide free first consultations.

The custodial parent could take that issue back to court if they are convinced that situation is not in the best interest of the child. The non-custodial parent should make certain the child has comfortable sleeping arrangements. An air mattress could be purchased at low cost and would be better than sleeping on the floor.

This is definitely a matter that needs to be discussed with an attorney. If there is already a child support and visitation order in place the custodial parent will need to file a motion to get the court's permission to move the child out of state. The court will make a determination that is in the best interest of the child. It will consider how visitations will be arranged and how they will be paid for so as not to cause financial hardship for the non-custodial parent. If there is no prior court order and the non-custodial parent has not been paying child support nor spending time with the child the custodial parent can try relocating. However, there is always the chance the non-custodial parent will seek rights and it may be more expensive later on to address this issue. You should seek the advice of an attorney who specializes in family law in your state who can review your situation and explain your options.

No. The court will require that the non-custodial parent be notified. They will be given the opportunity to object. If necessary the court will make the decision that is in the best interest of the child. It would be better to get the NC parent's consent.No. The court will require that the non-custodial parent be notified. They will be given the opportunity to object. If necessary the court will make the decision that is in the best interest of the child. It would be better to get the NC parent's consent.No. The court will require that the non-custodial parent be notified. They will be given the opportunity to object. If necessary the court will make the decision that is in the best interest of the child. It would be better to get the NC parent's consent.No. The court will require that the non-custodial parent be notified. They will be given the opportunity to object. If necessary the court will make the decision that is in the best interest of the child. It would be better to get the NC parent's consent.

The child already lives with the custodial parent.In the child wants to live with the non custodial parent that parent must petition for a modification of the custody order. The "best interests of the child" is considered by the judge. The court will hear what the child has to say, if the child is old enough to reason, but will not necessarily do what the child asks.At age eighteen the child can make their own decision.

New Mexico starts considering the child's wishes to be a factor in custody determination at age 14.It's always only one of several factors, though, and the general presumption of courts is that relocation, especially relocation out of the state (let alone out of the country), is always against the child's best interests. So the custodial parent is going to have to prove to the court that the move would be beneficial for the child.

If the parent thinks the home-schooling is not in the best interest of the child then they should request a court hearing on that issue. Home schooling in some cases may result in unacceptable isolation of the child and undue influence by the custodial parent. You should consult with an attorney if you have genuine concerns.


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