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If a cosigner on your car loan start getting bad credit from her credit cards should it affect your credit too?

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2010-01-14 01:00:30
2010-01-14 01:00:30

not if you make your payments like you should a cosigner is only called upon if you default on your loan

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It should not affect your chances at all unless the payments are delinquent and end up affecting your credit score. Your credit score is the first the lenders look at when decided what type of loan you qualify for.


If the cosigner has a good credit rating any credit card company would be more than happy to let them cosign. All credit card companies are interested in is getting their money back. The cosigner should always be as sure as possible that the person they are cosigning for is reliable and will pay back any outstanding balance because if they don't the cosigner is 100% responsible in paying that debt back!


No. The cosigner should make certain the loan payments are being made since they guaranteed the loan would be paid back. If the primary borrower isn't paying then the cosigner must pay or their own credit record will be ruined and the lender can go after them for payment.No. The cosigner should make certain the loan payments are being made since they guaranteed the loan would be paid back. If the primary borrower isn't paying then the cosigner must pay or their own credit record will be ruined and the lender can go after them for payment.No. The cosigner should make certain the loan payments are being made since they guaranteed the loan would be paid back. If the primary borrower isn't paying then the cosigner must pay or their own credit record will be ruined and the lender can go after them for payment.No. The cosigner should make certain the loan payments are being made since they guaranteed the loan would be paid back. If the primary borrower isn't paying then the cosigner must pay or their own credit record will be ruined and the lender can go after them for payment.


YES !!! He/she should certainly discuss it with the cosigner. It may be a gift or it may just be that the cosigner doesn't want to have that note appearing on his/her credit report. Whatever the reason, even if the cosigner did it as a gift, the primary should acknowledge and express appreciation. But be prepared if the cosigner expects the loan to be paid back.


Normally a cosigner has to be able to pay the loan if the signer does not pay. So the cosigner should have better credit than the person seeking the loan.


You should be able to get a car loan with a qualified cosigner. Even with a repossession on your credit you should be able to finance a car loan.


You were probably denied your loan application BECAUSE of your credit rating. It should be possible to find out what your credit report says about you - see the link below.


The co-signer is fully responsible for paying the loan and, therefore, they should take over the payments immediately to prevent damage to their own credit record.Cosigners should make certain they know what their obligations are before they sign. A person who has poor credit or no credit record needs a cosigner when they borrow money. A cosigner is a person who accepts the responsibility of repayment of a loan along with the primary borrower. The lender requires a cosigner to increase the chances that it will be repaid. The cosigner is sometimes referred to as the guarantor because they guarantee the full repayment of the loan in the event the borrower defaults. The cosigned loan will appear as a debt on the cosigners credit record.The co-signer is fully responsible for paying the loan and, therefore, they should take over the payments immediately to prevent damage to their own credit record.Cosigners should make certain they know what their obligations are before they sign. A person who has poor credit or no credit record needs a cosigner when they borrow money. A cosigner is a person who accepts the responsibility of repayment of a loan along with the primary borrower. The lender requires a cosigner to increase the chances that it will be repaid. The cosigner is sometimes referred to as the guarantor because they guarantee the full repayment of the loan in the event the borrower defaults. The cosigned loan will appear as a debt on the cosigners credit record.The co-signer is fully responsible for paying the loan and, therefore, they should take over the payments immediately to prevent damage to their own credit record.Cosigners should make certain they know what their obligations are before they sign. A person who has poor credit or no credit record needs a cosigner when they borrow money. A cosigner is a person who accepts the responsibility of repayment of a loan along with the primary borrower. The lender requires a cosigner to increase the chances that it will be repaid. The cosigner is sometimes referred to as the guarantor because they guarantee the full repayment of the loan in the event the borrower defaults. The cosigned loan will appear as a debt on the cosigners credit record.The co-signer is fully responsible for paying the loan and, therefore, they should take over the payments immediately to prevent damage to their own credit record.Cosigners should make certain they know what their obligations are before they sign. A person who has poor credit or no credit record needs a cosigner when they borrow money. A cosigner is a person who accepts the responsibility of repayment of a loan along with the primary borrower. The lender requires a cosigner to increase the chances that it will be repaid. The cosigner is sometimes referred to as the guarantor because they guarantee the full repayment of the loan in the event the borrower defaults. The cosigned loan will appear as a debt on the cosigners credit record.


Yes, that is the main purpose of having a cosigner. The person is accepting equal resposibility for repayment of the debt if the primary borrower should default. Therefore a cosigner needs to the have acceptable financial status as required by the lender.



No because you applied for the loan with YOUR credit. For whatever reason (you have the right to find out why) the dealership decided you were too big of a risk to be granted the loan you requested. The purpose of the cosigner is that in case you mess up your cosigner will be responsible for the loan.


The spouse is not responsible and should not have this on her credit. But the estate of the deceased will still be responsible for the debt.


It really depends on your particular situation. If you are a young person like 25 or under and trying to get a loan, you may have to get a cosigner. If you have a history of good credit and are older, you should not have to get a cosigner.


Yes. Only in this manner can they ascertain that the cosigner is credit worthy as claimed. Everything must be verified beyond any shadow of a doubt. The cosigner needs to be well aware of the circumstances should the one they are signing for default on what is owed. If someone racks up $40,000 in credit, then doesn't pay, the cosigner is then FULLY responsible for the entire balance due, which could totally ruin their own credit rating. Just be very careful about what you are cosigning for and read ALL the fine print.


If you have been looking for ways to pay for college, you have probably thought about taking out a few student loans. However, you might have found that a lot of student loans require that you have either a high credit score or a cosigner. If you don't have credit or if your credit is bad and if you don't know anyone who is willing to cosign with you for a student loan, you might be unsure of if you will ever be able to pay for college. Fortunately, there are ways to get student loans without a cosigner. First of all, you should consider talking to a financial aid adviser about taking out a federal student loan. Federal student loans allow students to borrow money for school without a cosigner, and they do not even look at your credit score, which means you will still qualify if you have bad credit or if you don't have credit at all. Along with applying for student loans, you can also apply for federal grants. Just like loans, these grants will provide you with the money that you need to pay for college, but you won't have to worry about paying them back in the future. Secondly, you could consider working on your credit score so that you won't need a cosigner in order to get a student loan. Although you might think it will be impossible to boost your credit score, it might be easier than you think. By getting a cell phone or cable bill in your name and paying it on time or getting a credit card and using and paying for it responsibly, you can boost your credit score, and this can help you qualify for student loans without the need for a cosigner. Lastly, you can consider looking for student loans that will allow students with bad credit to apply, even without a cosigner. Although this might be more difficult, a little patience might help you find a lender who is actually willing to give you a chance.


As a former banker, I was often asked this type of question. A cosigner is a person who is legally obligated to the lender (usually a bank or a finance company) to repay a loan that may, or may not, have benefited the cosigner. By signing the loan documents, the cosigner assumes equal and full responsibility to repay the loan. Note the term 'equal' - most financial institutions make no distinction between who signs the contract first or second, both parties are equally responsible. Where the car is or who has possession of it makes no difference. The loan contract is between the borrowers (yes, the cosigner is a borrower) and the lender. Should the loan go in to default (payments late, missed, or completely in default), no matter what personal agreements the cosigner had with the primary borrower about who should make the payments or who has possession of the car, the financial institution will make attempts to collect from both parties and report that information to the credit bureaus where it will impact equally both the primary borrower's and cosigner's credit history, credit score, and affect each party's ability to obtain credit in the future.


No, your low credit score should not affect your husband's credit score, unless the lender/bank uses both your information for the loan. Credit score is based on each individual's information.


Possibly. However, the cosigner needs to understand all the implications should the one needing the cosign on the load default on payments. If the primary borrower doesn't pay the co-signer will be held personally responsible for paying the loan in full. That's what they agree to when they sign as co-signer.


Can I get loan from bank with 682 credit score.


Someone can get an Icici credit card starting at age 18. Age should not be the main consideration when getting a credit card. Credit history and responsibility are important.


It is possible to recover from a bankruptcy. You should start by getting a secured credit card to rebuild credit. After about seven years you should be able to find a standard credit card that will allow you to get a card.


They should certainly try.


No. Loans from 401(k) accounts are not usually reported to credit reporting agencies, so it should not affect your credit history favorably, or negatively.


No they can not because then the cosinger can report te car being stolen. YES YOU CAN AS LONG AS YOU ARE THE PRIMARY OWNER OF THE VEHICLE. THE COSIGNER IS JUST A PERSON WHO HAS MADE AN AGREEMENT WITH THE BANK THAT IF FOR SOME REASON YOU SHOULD DEFAULT ON THE LOAN THE BANK CAN PURSUE THE COSIGNER. BECAUSE THE COSIGNER PRESUMABLY HAS BETTER CREDIT AND STRONGER WORK HISTORY, THUS THE ABILITY TO REPAY THE LOAN. OF COURSE YOU HAVE TO BE OF AGE AND FOLLOW ALL OF THE LAWS WHEN DRIVING.


The cosigner can ask but I seriously doubt they will be successful. The cosigner knew the risks when they signed the loan application. The cosigner knew, or should have known, the borower's history of successful loan payoffs were questionable at best. The cosigner assumed the responsibility when they signed on.



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