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If you are going to order a vehicle and will not take possession for at least six weeks do you need insurance when placing the order?

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Answered
2017-03-22 18:32:54
2017-03-22 18:32:54

You should contact your insurance company.

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Answered
2015-07-16 19:19:13
2015-07-16 19:19:13

No

The seller might require it, but even if you had it, you could argue that the seller's coverage would apply since you hadn't taken possession of the vehicle. Almost always, the insurance follows the car, so if one of the seller's employees had an accident in the car, your carrier might be approached. Most likely, though, your carrier would understand that the vehicle hadn't really been in your possession, or didn't technically belong to you yet, and would advise the seller to look to their own carrier.

Strange request by the seller, though, if that's indeed the case. I'd be wary...

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