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If you sold a car with no written contract the buyer took it from MN to VA and is not making payments can you go get it if title is in your name?


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2015-07-15 19:30:53
2015-07-15 19:30:53

LEGALLY, YES, you can go get it IF your name is on the TITLE. be ready to deal with the money part of the deal from him.

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The lender has the right to receive all the payments. A co-buyer has no rights TO the payments.The co-buyer is equally responsible for making the payments.The lender has the right to receive all the payments. A co-buyer has no rights TO the payments.The co-buyer is equally responsible for making the payments.The lender has the right to receive all the payments. A co-buyer has no rights TO the payments.The co-buyer is equally responsible for making the payments.The lender has the right to receive all the payments. A co-buyer has no rights TO the payments.The co-buyer is equally responsible for making the payments.

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Cosigning for ANYONE is one big mistake. If the person you cosign for is not making the payments then the person that cosigned is responsible for all payments. I have no idea why anyone would want to do this. Unless there were stipulations in the contract you signed with the buyer, then no, they can't just up and sell the car. Take another look at your contract. Marcy

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Both the co-buyer and the buyer get the credit and the blame if the loan is not paid. Co-signing on the loan is the same as getting the loan.

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A contract for deed is a real estate transaction in which the seller retains title to the property and finances the sale with the buyer. A contract for deed is also referred to as an installment sales contract. The popularity of a contract for deed transactions rises and falls, depending on the availability of mortgage lending. In a contract for deed, the buyer does not obtain a mortgage. The seller agrees to take a down payment and monthly payments made directly to the seller. The seller will hold the deed to the property in escrow. Normally, an interest rate is charged on the outstanding balance of the contract, much like a lender charges mortgage interest. The buyer will usually obtain possession to the property when the contract is signed, but not title to the property. If the buyer defaults on the contract, the seller merely cancels the contract and retakes possession. The buyer will normally forfeit the down payment and any payments made will be treated as rent. In some states, if the buyer has paid a substantial portion of the contract, courts may treat the contract as a mortgage, and the buyer may receive a portion of the equity back. Taxes, insurance and maintenance are usually treated as if the buyer had obtained a mortgage and was the owner of the property. Yearly taxes are usually the responsibility of the buyer. Prudent sellers will require the buyer to obtain fire and casualty insurance, and will often require the buyer to name the seller as a payee. Repairs and maintenance are also usually the responsibility of the buyer. Sometimes, a seller will require permission if the buyer intends on making improvements to the property, especially if the buyer is retaining contractors. A buyer will normally need the seller's permission to resell the property. However, if the buyer obtains a sufficient sales price to pay off the remainder of the contract, the buyer can simply pay off the contract and then immediately sell the property to the subsequent buyer. A contract for deed may or may not have a balloon payment. Balloon payments are more commonly seen on shorter term contracts. After a number of years of monthly payments, 5 years, for example, the buyer must pay off the remainder of the contract. The final payment is known as the balloon payment. For example, A sells a property to B for $150,000, with $10,000 down and payments of $800.00 per month for 5 years, accruing interest at 5%. At the end of 5 years, the remaining balance must be paid in full. If payments are timely made, there will be a remaining balance of $125,265.00. The buyer must pay off the $125,265.00 as a balloon payment to complete the contract. A contract for deed can be beneficial to both parties, but is more risky than a mortgage. The seller, by providing his own financing, obtains interest from the buyer. If the seller has an existing mortgage, the lender might call the loan due, if the mortgage permits it. The buyer takes the risk that payments will be made. If a default occurs, the buyer may lose everything invested in the property.


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