Auto Parts and Repairs
Brake Pads and Rotors
VW Passat

When changing the brake pads on a Mercedes ML320 can you skip the turning of the rotors if the rotor is smooth and hasn't gone metal to metal?

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Wiki User
September 17, 2004 2:37PM

Yes, as long as it's not warped or anything. The rotors on my cars are also smooth & not warped and I've never turned the rotors in 140,000 miles. Some people turn the rotors as a matter of fact.

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If rotors are smooth and shiny, they are good. If still not certain, ask at brake shop.

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The rotors should be smooth, no grooves where the pads touch. The rotors should be smooth, no grooves where the pads touch.

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This is often caused by installing new pads on worn or slightly worn rotors. Buying new rotors or turning the same rotors would make a smooth surface for the new pads to rub against. Any surface that is less than smooth will cause some grinding for a few days or maybe longer. It also shortens the life of your new pads.

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if there is uneven wear on the rotors, the new pads will take time to wear into the grooves on the rotors. rotors in poor condition will reduce the efficiency of your brakes, and promote wear of the pads, you will end up changing them more often. Most brake shops can turn rotors back to being smooth and true.

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The "C" is for comfort, this adjust the ride for a more comfortable and smooth acceleration and deceleration, smoother turning, etc. The "S" is for standard ride.

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Brake rotor specs are specified by the manufacturer. It is measured with a micrometer and if too thin via specs, will overheat causing a serious brake fade and loss of braking ability. Other problems could be that the rotor overheats and either warps or breaks~neither good. Turning the rotors is a process of rough cut and smooth cut that is supposed to take minimal amounts of metal off to make it an even surface for your brake pads to brake against. Most manufacturers today produce rotors that are not really able to be turned. So new rotors made be the only answer if yours are bad.

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Brembo is a brand that makes car parts and equipment. There stock rotors as well. Their street rotors seem to have a good reputation and are reliable. Very smooth ride, quiet, withstand high stress and temperatures.

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possibly warped rotors.Feels for grooves on the rotors(when rotors are cool,your rotors should be smooth ) if you feel them you need to replace them,and dont forget to replace your pads too.Worn pads grind your rotors and ruin them.

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When changing from chord to chord or to a different way to carry the beat in a song, if you do it subtley or without a lot of notice it can be determined smooth. The hook in a song can be done with a lot of percussion, or hardly noticeable; that would be smooth also. Jimmy Hedrix was a heavy rock musician, and yet he was very smooth in his playing turning chords over delicately to change the mood in a song. Another definition of "smooth" is Legato, which is Italian for smooth, flowing. This term is commonly used in sheet music for a piano.

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You don't need to compulsorily turn the rotors every time the pads are changed. Turning is required only if the rotor (or disc) is warped, badly scratched or heavily rusted. Smooth concentric circles are usually normal unless heavily ridged (and this requires turning). Remember though that turning the rotor many times will eventually require replacing it as there is a minimum safe thickness to which is can be turned. Any thinner will warrant replacement.

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Rotors are always turned off the vehicle. They are put on a lathe and a thin sheet of metal is removed to make the surface smooth again.

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Because a combustion engine keeps turning over as long as it's running. If you hadn't got a clutch (or the torque converter in an auto tranny) the engine would have to be stopped everytime the vehicle was stopped. Also, when you're changing gears you're hooking a turning engine up to parts that aren't turning. If you didn't have a clutch to smooth out that transition it'd get very jerky.

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You can if they are fairly smooth and do not have very bad ridges or grooves on them. If they do not meet the minimum thickness spec, they should be replaced now. Rotors are cheap (read: made in China); just replace them.

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New rotors for your vehicle cost between $40 and $60 each. If they still meet the minimum thickness they can be turned on a metal lathe and made smooth again for about $15 per rotor.

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"Smooth" is usually an adjective, but can be an adverb when it means "smoothly, in a smooth fashion." e.g. the motor runs smooth, the wood must be sanded smooth. (Purists might contend that the motor runs smooth is incorrect, it should be smoothly, but this is probably one of those cases where we have to accept that the language is changing.) It can also be a verb.

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When they go bad. But seriously, when you slow down and if it isn't a smooth braking. Also when you change your pads (or if you have someone do that for) you should check the rotors for wear. They should be smooth on both sides. If there are grooves or uneven wearing then you should replace them.

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If you didn't turn the rotors (have them ground to give a smooth, even surface), the uneven rotor face on the new pads may squeal.

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you should always change the rotors aswell so you don't get a pulsation. firt you remove the wheel . then the 2 caliper bolts with i believe are a 12mm . then press the caliper piston back by squeezing them with a big pair of channel lock pilers or a c clamp. then remove the 2 caliper mounting cradle bolts which i believe are a 17mm them remove the rotor. You don't always have to change the rotors. If the brakes are pulsing when you push them, take the rotors to an auto parts store and ask them to cut the rotors for you. This can only be done a few times, but it basically shaves off a level of metal on the rotors to make them smooth again. If they can't be cut, and you feel the pulsations, then you need to replace the rotors

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The rotors in disc brakes and the drums are what the pads and shoes rub against to stop a car. With use, the surface can get grooves in it or a build up of rust scale; reducing the braking efficiency. To machine the rotors and drums, they are put on a lathe that cuts a new smooth surface on the face of each. Depending on wear, any given rotor or drum can probably be turned 2 or 3 times before needing to be replaced.

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chemical The rusting of iron in the nail to iron oxide is a chemical change.

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Not sure what the purpose of rotating the rotors is supposed to be, but if you meant to 'turn the rotors', that means to have the rotor faces machined or ground smooth and flat. If you mean 'rotate the rotors' like you would rotate tires, it's easy enough to do and I can't think of much harm (or benefit) to doing it. Are you sure someone isn't just pranking you? Just take off the front wheels, unbolt the calipers (two 18mm bolts each side), then remove and support them. *DO NOT let them hang by the brake line, rest them on a block or hang them from a wire* slip off the rotors and put them back on the opposite wheel. Reinstall the calipers and wheels. *You may need to use a 4" C-clamp to squeeze the caliper(s) enough to slide them back onto the rotors* Your rotors are now rotated, and coincidentally spinning in the reverse direction when you're moving.

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to keep the inner tire from skipping and wearing out premature as well as to smooth out the ride during turning

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Fibroadenoma is a smooth, rubbery or hard lump that moves easily within the breast tissue and it is benign. It can be removed without changing the shape of the breast