answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2011-04-30 14:32:18
2011-04-30 14:32:18

Simple covalent molecules have low melting and boiling points because although the covalent bonds between the atoms are very strong, the intermolecular forces between the molecules themselves are extremely weak. Hence this gives them the property of a low melting and boiling point.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


Yes, in comparison to ionic compounds, covalent compounds have relatively low boiling and melting points.


actually, Covalent compounds generally have low melting and boiling points


Simple covalent molecules tend to have low boiling and melting points, as well as being quite brittle when solid.


Molecules with a covalent bond have lower melting points.


As a generalization, the melting and boiling points of ionic compounds are substantially higher than the corresponding characteristics of covalent compounds. However, there are some ionic compounds with lower melting points than many covalent compound. Some substituted tetra-ammonium salts in particular are liquid at room temperature. There are also some covalent compounds such as diamond with higher melting points than most ionic compounds.


These are compounds with covalent bonds.


Generally covalent molecular compounds have low melting points because the forces of attraction between molecules are weak. Some covalent compounds are giant molecules and these have high melting points, e.g. silica SiO2


As a generalization, the melting and boiling points of ionic compounds are substantially higher than the corresponding characteristics of covalent compounds. However, there are some ionic compounds with lower melting points than many covalent compound. Some substituted tetra-ammonium salts in particular are liquid at room temperature. There are also some covalent compounds such as diamond with higher melting points than most ionic compounds.




No they have high melting and boiling points. Don't get confused with simple molecular structures such as water and carbon dioxide which have simple covalent structures. When you heat them you are overcoming the forces BETWEEN THE MOLECULES (intermolecular/van der waals forces of attraction), NOT the actual covalent bonds themselves, like the bond betwen the C and either O in carbon dioxide.


The stronger the bonds between molecules; the higher the melting/boiling points. This makes sense if you think about it, melting/boiling is splitting up the molecules - the stronger they are bonded the more energy you will need


Covalent bonds do not melt. Compounds with covalent bonds melt and the melting point depends primarily on whether there are discrete molecules held together by intermolecular forces (which have lower melting points) or giant covalent networks such as in silica or diamond (which tend to have higher melting points).


The stronger the intermolecular forces, the higher the melting point and boiling point. The weaker the intermolecular forces, the lower the melting and boiling points are.


Because although the covalent bonds between the elements are strong, there are only weak forces between the molecules so they have low melting points


The melting points and boiling points of molecular covalent compounds (ones with discrete molecules) are lower than ionic solids and giant molecule covalent compounds like (silica, SiO2) because the forces that attract them together in the solid and the liquid states (van der waals, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces) are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds.


1 covalent bonds are molecules (neutral) 2 do not conduct electricity 3 low melting and boiling points 4 are less soluble in water and more soluble in non-aqueous solvents.


Ionic compounds have higher melting points because the bond olding the ionic crystal together is stronger than the intermolecular forces (van der Waals) holding covalent molecules together. Giant covalent molecules such as dialmond and silicon dioxide have very high melting points because the lattice is held together by stong covalent bonds


The melting points and boiling points of molecular covalent compounds (ones with discrete molecules) are lower than ionic solids and giant molecule covalent compounds like (silica, SiO2) because the forces that attract them together in the solid and the liquid states (van der waals, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces) are weaker than ionic (or covalent) bonds.


The melting points and boiling points of molecular covalent compounds (ones with discrete molecules) are lower than ionic solids and giant molecule covalent compounds like (silica, SiO2) because the forces that attract them together in the solid and the liquid states (van der waals, hydrogen bonding and dispersion forces) are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds.


Compared to ionic compounds, covalent compounds have relatively low melting and boiling points because covalent bonds are not as strong as ionic bonds, and it is the bonds which hold materials together in the solid, or more solid phases.



Yes, it is a covalent crystal. It differes from normal covalent bondings because it has high melting and boiling points. And also because it conducts electricity.


Not all compounds have high melting points and high boiling points.


Melting and boiling points are generally higher for large molecules than small, and also higher for polar than for non-polar molecules.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.