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You were denied LTD benefits when you left your job because of back problems 4 years ago and have not been able to work since then can you go back and apply for LTD from from previous employer?

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Wiki User
2009-10-18 19:37:30
2009-10-18 19:37:30

no, your screwed :D

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When someone is fired from a job, and applies for unemployment, the job that fired them is contacted. The previous employer is contacted, because they are the one who pays the unemployment.

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The employer benefits because they don't have to pay their employees as much. Therefore, the employer can make more money.

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Individual disability insurance benefits are not taxable, because the premiums are paid with after-tax money. The employer paid disability insurance policies have taxable benefits due to the fact that premiums are paid by the employer with pre-tax money.

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If you mean an EMPLOYER (you can't sue a job), then the answer is simple: If the employer allows you to receive workers comp benefits for your injury, then employer negligence is irrelevant, no suit is possible against the employer.

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No you cannot. Just because its tht the law bill of rights.

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What did you least enjoy in your previous job is a question that you may be asked in an interview. This is a dangerous question because the interviewer is seeing if you are going to bash your former employer.

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Yes, but ONLY if you had worked for that previous employer during the current base period (in most states this is in the first 4 of the last 5 completed calendar quarters), AND had qualified for the benefits when you left THAT job. In most circumstances, the answer would be no, you couldn't. Also, if the employer had not merely paid into the system, because the state does the paying, you might still collect. Bear in mind, however, some employers are exempt from the payroll taxes due to the industry their in, etc., so that has a bearing, too. Check with you own state's employment office for clarification.

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PROBLEMS: 1) Not environmental friendly 2) It is limited BENEFITS: 1) Source of revenue because of quantity 2) Very effective in

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If you voluntarily quit because of a DISABLING med condition, you cannot get UI benefits because you are not able to work. If you quit because of a nondisabling medical condition, your employer will properly petition WA Employment Security to deny you benefits charged against the employer who was willing to keep you employed.

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You will need to ask your employer or the employer you retired from. You can research your social security benefits by calling the SSA office nearest you. To find out exactly what you retirement benefits consist of , it will be necessary to contact the human resource department. Because the benfits vary from company to company, there is no general answer to that question. If you are concerned regarding social security benefits, contact the social security office in your area.

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it doesn't :)p some times it does only in certain jobs and it increases it by about 25 percent.

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Yes, to the state's employment security investigator, who is checking out your application for benefits, and no to anyone else because it's confidential information.

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Passively, yes. If a potential employer wants a letter of recommendation from a former employer, and the former employer knows the ex-employee is a hopeless loser or an outright crook, they will write a letter of "recommendation" that will say in effect: "So-and-so worked for us from this date until that date and was found to be 'satisfactory' ". That is the kiss of death. And the former employer has covered themselves, because they said - in print - the employee had been 'satisfactory'.

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Yes, if your disability insurance policy has a benefit that is integrated with social insurance benefits.Most employer paid disability insurance policies are integrated with social security benefits, because of the lower premium they have to pay. Individual disability insurance plans can be purchased with or without social security integration. Benefits that are not integrated with social security benefits will not be affected whether you apply or not for social security disability benefits.

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No because your Employer is dead. I killed him.

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This would depend on the basis for the disciplinary action. Under your own state's unemployment security laws the employer is allowed to discharge a worker for a variety of reasons. If those reasons are allowed and proved by the employer, the unemployment office would find for the employer and you would not collect.

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Because Florida is the "liable" state (where your employer had paid your ;payroll taxes to), your unemployment benefits would continue to be paid by that state. You need to contact Florida's employment security office for information on continuing to receive your benefits.

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The same as for any other citizen. If he has worked and is now laid off, he is likely eligible for unemployment benefits. If he is disabled, he has a right to apply for and wait for benefits like everyone else. If he is employed, he has a right to whatever benefits package that employer offers same as all of the employees.He is not entitled to any benefits, state or federal, simply because he is being released from incarceration.

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because the nonrenewable cannot be replaced at all or cannot be replaced as fast as we use it

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You can, but it would not help you very much. Tell him you left to move or attend school, or some other safe reason.

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If you are not sure how long an employear will be interviewing, a good question is "How soon will you be making a decision regarding this position?" Also if not previously discussed: "what benefits do you offer?" "How long do I have to work before benefits are available to me?" "What are your educational benefits?" Don't ask too many questions because it will appear that you are interviewing the employer!


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