Augustus

Augustus is considered the first emperor of the Roman Empire, which he ruled alone from 27 BC until his death in 14 AD. Born Gaius Octavius Thurinus, he was adopted posthumously by his great-uncle Gaius Julius Caesar in 44 BC via his last will and testament, and between then and 27 BC was officially named Gaius Julius Caesar. In 27 BC the Senate awarded him the honorific Augustus ("the revered one"), and thus consequently he was Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus.

975 Questions
Ancient Rome
Augustus

Is Augustus and Gaius the same person?

Romans had three basic names - a personal name, a family name and a definitive name. Caesar for example was Gaius (personal name) Julius (family name) Caesar (meaning fine head of hair - a joke as he was bald). Gaius was a very common personal name. The person in question was born Gaius (personal name) Octavius (family name) Thurinus. When adopted by great-uncle Caesar he took his family name but retained his own family name as a definitive one, and became Gaius Julius Octavianus; he subsequently took the deified Caesar's definative name Caesar too. And on assuming his role as First Citizen in 27 BCE he looked for a useful title, and settled on the non-specific but high-sounding one of Augustus. So yes, his personal name was Gaius, and his title was Augustus.

575859
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

How did Octavian become the emperor of Rome?

He won the position by winning the final civil war of the Roman republic. The battle of Actium, saw Octavian destroy the forces of Antony, who was the rival of Octavian in 31 BC. He also drew loyalty from supporters of Julius Caesar. Octavian was Caesar's adoptive son.

555657
Roman Empire
Augustus

Did Augustus try to call himself the king of Rome?

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

No. Never. Calling oneself a king in ancient Rome was a very risky business considering the feelings of the Roman people about kings. Augustus always referred to himself as the "first citizen" or in Latin, "princeps" from which we get the term for the rule of the emperors which is the principate.

293031
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

Did Augustus Caesar create anything useful or unique?

Yes, he created a form of government that lasted from 31 BC to 1453 AD. This long period of time was due to the survival of the Roman Empire in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. The capital of the eastern empire was Constantinople later called Byzantium and gave birth to the Byzantine Empire. The capital was strategically located between the Black Sea And the Mediterranean Sea. It was not until 1453 that the Turks overran this city and ended the Byzantium Empire.

Augustus, made changes however, during his reign that was a policy decision resulting in what is now referred to as the Pax Romana. This began directly after Augustus had full control of the Empire. The main part of the Pax Romana was the significant reduction in the size of the Roman military. Rather than bring up armies to resolve problems in or near the boundaries of the Empire, Augustus used diplomacy rather then force to settle problems. The expansion of the Empire was subdued. Later necessary military actions had to be taken in Dacia and Britain. Augustus improved public works within the Empire as well.

495051
History, Politics & Society
History of Europe
Roman Empire
Augustus

What is Augustus Caesar personality?

When rising into power he was ruthless - those who had enough wealth and power to oppose and threaten him of his position were murdered. However, after the battle at Actium (in which Augustus defeated the army of Antony and Cleopatra) he put the thuggish, cruel and villainous character to one side and assumed a completely different mask. He made sure to live his life in simple-ness as to show the people of Rome he was not trying to thow over the Republic and assume complete control. He was a master of manipulation and a real genius. He made the people and the senate think they 'needed' him and in fact implored his leadership. Four years after the battle at Actium, Augustus asked to resign from all his powers and shares of provinces. The senates feared that the unclaimed powers would lead to more civil war - in fact they refused his resignation and assigned him more governing power than before. Which is quite obvious it is what he intended.

He was also renown for his adultery, even though he set laws and fines for such promiscuity. However it is arguable that he became more responsible after marrying Livia. His own daughter and granddaughter (both named Julia) were exiled to islands for promiscuity. Julia the Elder was not to have wine, luxuries or be visited by men - overall her life was to be uncomfortable.

It's really left unto the reader to interpret his personality. It can't exactly be defined as bad as much as it can be defined as good. However for a Roman Emperor he was pretty fair compared to the others that followed.

252627
Religion & Spirituality
Ancient Egypt
Cleopatra
Augustus

Who was the last Greek pharaoh to rule Ancient Egypt?

Queen Cleopatra was the last ruler of Egypt with Greek ancestry. After her death, Egypt became a Roman province. Augustus Caesar ruled the Egyptian province as his own and appointed a surrogate to administer this important region in the Mediterranean world.

454647
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

What men was the months named after?

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

There are only two men that have months named after them. They are Julius Caesar, who Had the month of July named for him, and Augustus Caesar who has the month of August named for him.

232425
Health
Ancient Rome
Augustus

What good things did Augustus do?

He built roads, aqueducts, and many other buildings for Rome.

234
Roman Empire
Augustus

What was the date Augustus became roman ruler?

He became roman ruler 27 B.C

353637
History, Politics & Society
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

Why was Augustus Caesar a mystery?

He is not a mystery - he made a point of being transparent to keep popular support. He even wrote an autobiographical account Res Gestae Divi Augusti which you can look up on the internet where he details his actions. He gets a large section in the TV series I Claudius which gives a good background.

333435
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

Where did diocles win over 1400 horse racing type events?

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

Diocles was a charioteer and won most, if not all of his races in Rome. It was in Rome that his admirers put up a monument to him upon his retirement.

8910
Roman Empire
Augustus

Why did the senate call octavian augustus?

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

Augustus was an honorific title given to Octavian in recognition for his accomplishments.

789
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

What was Vergil's relationship with Caesar Augustus?

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

Virgil was the writer that Augustus commissioned to write a history of Rome which we know as the Aeneid.

789
Estates
Ancient History
Roman Empire
Augustus

Who was Augustus' heir?

Tiberius, his wife's son by her former husband.

272829
Roman Empire
Augustus

What system did Augustus Caesar establish?

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

Augustus established a few systems, such as the reorganizing of the military, the police/fire brigade for the city of Rome, a postal service and the division of the city into wards. In government, he established the principate system, wherein one man held the power.

567
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

Did roman women choose who to marry?

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

The answer to your question is another of those "yes and no" answers. The parents of a girl would pick out a potential groom, or even a list of potential grooms. The girl would have to give her consent. However, in the Roman culture, children were brought up to respect the wishes of their parents, so the girl would nearly always consent to the man her parents suggested for her husband. However there were times when a woman/girl would pick out her own husband and her parents would go along with it. Remember, Roman marriages were not just the uniting of a man and wife, but the uniting of entire families, especially in the upper classes, so this factor had a bearing upon the choices a woman had for a husband.

567
Roman Empire
Augustus

What did Augustus like to do?

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

Augustus was an avid dice player. There was often a dice table set up at his smaller diners and he would give his guests money to play against him and let them keep their winnings.

567
Ancient History
Augustus

What were Augustus's achievements?

* He conquered many lands for the roman empire. * he restored peace after 100 years of civil war. * he made a good currency system. * he extended a highway system which connected the empires. * he developed an efficiant postal service. * he built bridges and buildings with classical artwork and he helped loads of people

151617
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

Who are the pratricians?

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

The patricians were an ancient Roman social class. At the beginning of the city they were the wealthy class with the power that their wealth brought them.

456
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

Who was Octavian?

Augustus: 63 BCE - 14), known as Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus (the 'us' on the end of Octavian indicated that his father died before his birth). He was nominated as his heir by the assassinated Julius Caesar who had adopted him. After Caesar's death he joined in a triumvirate with Marc Antony and Lepidus to control the Roman Republic during the ensuing civil war with Caesar's murderers including Cassius and Brutus. After their defeat he shared control of the Roan empire with the other two until war broke out again and he defeated Antony and Cleopatra.

He 'restprted the Republic' but, to avoid the prospect of other generals conteting for power which had plagued Rome for the past century, he established mechanisms to give himself over-riging control. This was based on taking for life the powers (not office) of a tribune of the plebs (immunity, veto and introducing legislation) and the powers of procosulship outside Rome; he left control of the settled provinces to the Senate, but took control of the unsettled ones, which is where the legions were so he had control of the army.

This fix preserved the outward form of the Roman Republic, but left him in overall control without the crude measure of being Dictator which had brought Julius Caeasar undone. He thus ruled as an autocrat for 41 years, longer than any subsequent ruler; and his rule is the dividing line between what we now call the Republic and the Principate (he took the title of princeps - First Citizen - any suggestion or being a king or emperor would bring out the knives which felled Julius Caesar). The word Emperor is a modern one - it comes from 'imperator' which is what general were called on the battlefield after a victory. I came into use to describe a ruler much later.

He ended a century of civil wars and set about limitinh and stabilising Rome's borders, opening an era of relative peace, prosperity, and imperial greatness, known as the Pax Romana, or Roman peace, which lasted for over 200 years

212223
Roman Empire
Augustus

What did Nero have in common to Augustus Caesar?

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

Nero and Augustus were both Julians and shared the same family. Nero was, in fact, the great, great, great grandson of Augustus.

345
Roman Empire
Julius Caesar
Augustus

How was the economy under Augustus Caesar?

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

The economy took a giant step forward under Augustus. Interest rates fell and much of the debt was relieved. There was an influx of cash and businesses were able to expand. There was work, as new and updated infrastructure facilities were built. Trade, especially in exotic goods from the east, flourished.

345
Roman Empire
Augustus

Was Augustus a succesful ruler?

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

Yes, Augustus was a highly successful ruler. He not only reformed the government and rebuilt the city, but he had the good fortune to have a long reign which enabled the populace to become accustomed to the principate form of government. Although there were plots against him, as there were with all other emperors, there is little reason to believe that any conspirators wanted to restore the republic---they wanted power for themselves.

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Roman Empire
Augustus

How did Augustus's reign end?

The reign of Augustus ended with his death. He died of natural causes at the age of 75.

Another credible version is that he was assassinated by his wife to set her son Tiberius up as emperor.

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Ancient Rome
Augustus

Were Romulus Augustus and Augustus related?

No, Romulus Augustus just took the name of the first king of Rome, Romulus, and the first emperor, Augustus Caesar.

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