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Blood

Blood is a bodily fluid consisting of plasma, blood cells, and platelets that is circulated by the heart through the vertebrate vascular system, carrying oxygen and nutrients to and waste materials away from all body tissues. In many species, it also carries hormones and disease-fighting substances. In this category, you will find questions about the blood in your body, including blood types, blood diseases, and the function of blood.

500 Questions

Which element is a major component of hemoglobin?

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Asked by Wiki User

Haemoglobin is made up of a protein called globin which is bound to a red pigment called heme (hence the name haemoglobin)

Globin is made up of 4 chains (polypeptide chains) embedded inside each of which is a heme molecule, the latter has an iron atom (in ferrous state) in it. It is the iron atom which carries a molecule of oxygen. As there are 4 chains this means that there are 4 iron atoms which means that 4 molecules of oxygen can be carried by each haemoglobin.

Globulin

What is the name of the blood vessel which supplies glucose and oxygen to tn heart muscle?

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Asked by Wiki User

The coronary arteries are the blood vessels that supply glucose and oxygen to the heart muscle. These arteries branch off the aorta and encircle the heart, delivering nutrients and oxygen-rich blood to support proper heart function.

What moves blood throughout the body?

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Asked by Wiki User

The heart pumps blood throughout the body by contracting and relaxing to create pressure that pushes the blood through the blood vessels. Arteries carry oxygen-rich blood away from the heart, while veins carry oxygen-poor blood back to the heart. This cycle of blood flow helps deliver oxygen and nutrients to cells and remove waste products from the body.

If an erythrocyte is placed in a hypertonic solution what will it do?

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Asked by Wiki User

An erythrocyte in a hypertonic solution will lose water due to osmosis and shrink or crenate. This is because the concentration of solutes outside the cell is higher than inside, causing water to move out of the cell to try to equalize the concentrations.

Are T and b cells are two types of phagocytes?

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Asked by Wiki User

No, T and B cells are not phagocytes. T cells are a type of lymphocyte involved in cell-mediated immunity, while B cells are another type of lymphocyte responsible for producing antibodies. Phagocytes are a different type of immune cell that engulf and digest pathogens.

Organelles that contain enzymes that destroy material engulfed by phagocytes are what?

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Asked by Wiki User

Lysosomes are the organelles that contain enzymes responsible for breaking down material engulfed by phagocytes. They help in the digestion of foreign particles or damaged organelles within the cell.

What is a list of the normal arterial blood gas values?

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Asked by Wiki User

There are many measures of Arterial Blood Gases.

The most common measure oxygen (by PaO2) and carbon dioxide (by PaCO2) levels.

Normal PaO2 is 80-100 mmHg. Normal PaCO2 is 35-45 mmHg. Bicarbonate is sometimes measured and its value is 22-26 mmHg. Other measurements are also taken depending on the situation.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arterial_blood_gas

Function- What is the purpose of the body part neutrophils?

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Asked by Shereseww

Neutrophils, a type of granulocyte (a type of white blood cell including neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils), is the most abundant white blood cell in the body. They are the most important component of the body's innate immune system. They are crucial for the generation of an acute inflammation response that is the body's first answer to almost all insults (foreign body, microbe invasion, etc). Their primary function is to phagocytose microorganisms and kill them with reactive oxygen species (superoxide, peroxide, hypochlorous acid) generated by a 'repiratory burst' (using the enzyme NADPH oxidase). Being granulocytes, they can also degranulate. However their degranulation capability is not as prominent as their innate phagocytotic capability. Eosinophils and basophils are more adapt at mediating their effects through degranulation.

What does the white blood cell look like?

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Asked by Wiki User

White blood cells are typically smaller than red blood cells and have a round or irregular shape. Under a microscope, they appear colorless with a nucleus and may exhibit granules or other structures depending on the type of white blood cell.

How many people do mosquitoes kill in a year?

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Asked by Wiki User

A Mosquito, a flying parasite, doesn't actually kill people by its own merit. 1-2 a year most likely. What makes mosquitoes so deadly is their disease transmission. When a mosquito attaches to a host, it draws blood as a means of nourishment. incidentally, mosquitoes go mostly unchecked in areas such as Africa, which also has many unchecked diseases. In one feeding, a mosquito can easily bite 4 to 5 people, and assuming that the mosquito has bitten an infected host, it can then transmit that disease to 4 to 5 people. So it follows that the number of infected can increase exponentially, for when one of the 4-5 people is bitten by another mosquito, that mosquito can go on to infect another 4-5 people.

SO

Mosquitoes worldwide infect around 250 million people with malaria. About 2-3 million people die from it. The remainder of the diseases that mosquitoes carry kill in the hundreds of thousands.

Is blood an alloy?

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Asked by Wiki User

No, blood is not an alloy. An alloy is a mixture of two or more metals, while blood is a complex fluid that contains various components such as red and white blood cells, platelets, and plasma.

The association of four subunit peptides in a fully functional molecule of hemoglobin is a good example of?

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Asked by Wiki User

quaternary structure in protein. Hemoglobin is composed of four subunits—two alpha and two beta chains—that come together to form a functional molecule capable of binding and transporting oxygen in the blood. The interactions between these subunits demonstrate how multiple protein subunits can assemble to create a complex, functional protein.

Origin of neutrophils?

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Asked by Wiki User

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that originate from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. They play a crucial role in the innate immune system by ingesting and destroying pathogens like bacteria and fungi. Neutrophils are released into the bloodstream where they migrate to sites of infection or inflammation.

How does the structure of erythrocytes relate to their function?

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Asked by Tonyalmason

Erythrocytes are shaped as biconcave discs, which increases their surface area for efficient gas exchange and allows them to deform as they pass through narrow capillaries. Their lack of a nucleus and organelles provides more space for hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen, enhancing their oxygen-carrying capacity. Additionally, their flexible membrane allows them to squeeze through tiny blood vessels and deliver oxygen to tissues throughout the body.

What is the migration of phagocytes and white blood cells to an inflamed area along a chemical gradient is called?

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Asked by Wiki User

This process is called chemotaxis. Phagocytes and white blood cells are attracted to the site of inflammation by chemical signals released by damaged cells. Chemotaxis helps these cells locate and eliminate pathogens and damaged tissue in the inflamed area.

Making DNA from DNA is called?

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Asked by Wiki User

DNA synthesis, properly known as Replication.

Is the heart what moves blood through the body?

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Asked by Wiki User

No, the heart pumps blood through the body using its strong muscle contractions. The circulatory system is responsible for transporting the blood to all parts of the body, including delivering oxygen and nutrients and removing waste products.

What does the letter t transcribe to in DNA?

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Asked by Wiki User

The letter T in DNA transcribes to thymine. Thymine is one of the four nucleotide bases found in DNA, and it pairs with adenine through hydrogen bonds.

What is released by platelets in the vicinity of an injury?

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Asked by Wiki User

Platelets release various substances such as growth factors, clotting factors, and inflammatory mediators in the vicinity of an injury. These substances help promote the clotting process, attract other immune cells to the site, and stimulate tissue repair and healing.

What is hormonal stimuli?

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Asked by Wiki User

Hormonal stimuli refer to the activation of certain cells or tissues in the body in response to specific hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers produced by various glands in the body that regulate bodily functions such as growth, metabolism, and reproduction. When these hormones bind to their target cells, they can trigger a variety of physiological responses.

What is hemocyanin?

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Asked by Wiki User

Hemocyanin is a copper-containing protein found in the circulatory system of many mollusks and arthropods. It functions in oxygen transport, similar to the iron-containing hemoglobin in vertebrates. Hemocyanin turns blue when oxygenated, giving these animals their characteristic blue blood.

What is the organelles that make up a neutrophil cell?

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Asked by Wiki User

Neutrophils contain multiple organelles, including a nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, and secretory vesicles. These organelles work together to carry out the various functions of the neutrophil, such as phagocytosis and secretion of antimicrobial substances.

If you have a high hemocrit would your hemoglobin be high or low?

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Asked by Wiki User

If you have a high hematocrit, your hemoglobin levels would likely be high as well. Hematocrit measures the volume of red blood cells in blood, while hemoglobin is the protein that carries oxygen in red blood cells. An increase in hematocrit often corresponds with an increase in hemoglobin levels.

What is the blood test in which the percent of each type of white blood cell is determined?

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Asked by Wiki User

A complete blood count (CBC) is the blood test that determines the percentage of each type of white blood cell. It provides information on the total number of white blood cells and differentiates between neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils.

What is a tgg blood test for?

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Asked by Wiki User

A TGG blood test is typically used to diagnose celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by the consumption of gluten. The test measures the level of tissue transglutaminase antibodies in the blood, which are often elevated in individuals with celiac disease.