Council of Trent

A series of twenty-five meetings stretched over an 18 year period to discuss the rift created by Protestantism. The stance of the Catholic Church in regards to the beliefs of any other Christian group was carefully defined and codified.

589 Questions
Council of Trent

Where was the Council of Trent located?

Trent, Italy

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Council of Trent

Were priests allowed to marry in the conclusion of the Council of Trent?

No, with the exception of Orthodox Catholic Priests

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Catholicism
Reformation History
Council of Trent

Why did the Catholic Church reform itself in the 1500s and 1600s?

Another answer from our community:

The Catholic Church propably wanted to minimize the damage caused by Protestant reformation by making itself more popular, defining its dogmas and fixing its alleged internal problems. This process is called the Counter-Reformation. Wikipedia has a good article on the subject.

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Council of Trent

When did the Council of Trent call to unite Catholics against protestantism?

Catholic AnswerNever, the Council of Trent (1545-63) reaffirmed traditional Christian teaching and condemned the errors of the reformers. It's primary function was to reaffirm that the constant teaching of the Christian Church from the last 15 centuries was still the teaching of the Church, that it could not change, and was guarded by the Holy Spirit. To the best of my knowledge, no where did the Council ever call Catholics to unite against the protestant heresy.

from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

The Council of Trent was in the years 1545-47, 1551-52 and 1562-63.

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Council of Trent

Why did the Council of Trent forbid indulgences?

The Council did not forbid indulgences, they forbade the sale of indulgences. Indulgences can be obtained only through spiritual actions, such as pilgrimages, attending missions, etc.

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Council of Trent
Catholicism

Protestants wanted to reform the catholic church in the 16th century because they believed the church was to?

corrupt.

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Council of Trent

What are some steps the Council of Trent took to correct the course of the Catholic Church?

Catholic Answer
The principal dogmatic decisions were:
. the confirmation of the Nicene Creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only;
. the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace;
. the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments;
. the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode:
. the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of Penance and Extreme Unction;
. the declaration that holy Communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species;
. the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony;
. the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences.
. Far reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations of canon law.
from
A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

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Law & Legal Issues
Divorce and Marriage Law
US Constitution
Council of Trent

Can you make changes in the dissolution of marriage after getting a signed court stipulation but not a final decree?

You can usually always make changes. Especially in Child Support.

For more info see your lawyer and www.SteveShorr.com/family.law.htm

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Council of Trent

What three traditional Catholic teachings were reaffirmed by the Church in the Council of Trent?

Catholic AnswerThere were many traditional teachings reaffirmed by the Council of Trent. That is just about all the Council of Trent did, of all the councils of the Church, it was far and away the most conservative breaking almost no new ground. Three traditional teachings included the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist, the necessity of the sacraments including confession and the priesthood, and the effectiveness of indulgences and praying for the dead - as noted in Scripture, the Second Book of Maccabees.

from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent

The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

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Angels
Council of Trent

What were the final decrees of the Council of Trent?

Catholic AnswerFor a complete discussion of the Council of Trent, please see the Catholic Encyclopedia article at the link below. The Council of Trent was an extremely conservative council in the Church, breaking no new ground. Almost everything they did was to reaffirm and make explicit long standing dogma and doctrine. Highlights are below:

from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent

The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

Answer

The four decrees were:

1. provide for more clerical discipline

2. remove church abuses

3. reaffirm the sacraments

4. provide a system for education clergy

Answer

It was a Council held in Trent in the 15th and 16th centuries in response to the Reformation. One of the main outcomes was the establishment of the seminary system. This moved theology away from the university to a separate system for priests to train. As this happened, the teaching of moral theology became better improved. This led to more people going to confession, which led to a higher demand for priests, which increased the number of priests in seminaries. I'm sure that there are more results, but that's the one that I know about.

had previously been decided.

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Council of Trent

What were the aims of the Council of Trent?

Answerfrom A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent

The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

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Council of Trent

What was one of the primary consequences of the Council of Trent in art and architecture?

The major consequence of the Council of Trent in art and architecture is known as Florid Baroque.

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Council of Trent

What did the Council of Trent achieve?

Answer

The Council of Trent issued rules to eliminate the abuses of the Church, such as the indulgences for alms, and to improve the quality of the bishops and priests.

The Council of Trent met three times between 1545 and 1563 to clarify Church teachings that had been criticized by Protestants. They also created new rules that clergy had to follow. For example, the Council of Trent said indulgences could no longer be granted for alms, bishops must live in the areas they oversee, and the ideas of Luther, Calvin, and other Reformation leaders are rejected. The Council of Trent played a key role in revitalizing the Catholic Church in Europe.

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Catholic AnswerThe Council of Trent, probably the most conservative Council in the history of the Church, broke no new ground, just reafffirming constant Christian teaching against the protestant heretics who were trying to teach all newly invented ideas only heard before in some previous heresies. The Council effectively stopped abuses, upgraded the minimum educational requirements of the clergy (the modern seminary system is a direct result of the Council of Trent), and put an end to indulgences in return for alms. To this day, one can only earn indulgences for prayer and fasting, (and other good works) not the third penitential work of alms. All rites of the Church (for instance, difference ways of saying Mass) that were less than two hundred years old were completely suppressed.

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from

A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent

The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

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Council of Trent

Why did the Roman Catholic Church set up the Council of Trent?

Catholic AnswerRoman is an epithet first commonly used in England after the protestant revolt to describe the Catholic Church. It is rarely used by the Catholic Church.

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The 19th Ecumenical Council of the Church was summoned for the purposes of 1) reforming the Church, and 2) combating protestantism. The nineteenth ecumenical council opened at Trent on 13 December, 1545, and closed there on 4 December, 1563. Its main object was the definitive determination of the doctrines of the Church in answer to the heresies of the Protestants; a further object was the execution of a thorough reform of the inner life of the Church by removing the numerous abuses that had developed in it. The Council of Trent was called by Paul III who was pope from 1534 to 1549 and it first sat in December 1545.

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from the Catholic Encyclopedia article on the Council of Trent

The Ecumenical Council of Trent has proved to be of the greatest importance for the development of the inner life of the Church. No council has ever had to accomplish its task under more serious difficulties, none has had so many questions of the greatest importance to decide. The assembly proved to the world that notwithstanding repeated apostasy in church life there still existed in it an abundance of religious force and of loyal championship of the unchanging principles of Christianity. Although unfortunately the council, through no fault of the fathers assembled, was not able to heal the religious differences of western Europe, yet the infallible Divine truth was clearly proclaimed in opposition to the false doctrines of the day, and in this way a firm foundation was laid for the overthrow of heresy and the carrying out of genuine internal reform in the Church.

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from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent

The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

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Council of Trent

What did the Council of Trent do?

To stop the spread of Protestantism and to reform the Catholic Church

~Ates

To examine and make clear the beliefs and practices of the Catholic Church.

The purpose of the Council of Trent was to refute and condemn the Protestant beliefs that were contradicting Roman Catholic beliefs.

Additionally, Trent formally reaffirmed the Catholic view of the Biblical canon.

To examine and make clear the beliefs and practices of the Catholic Church.

Direct the reform of the Catholic Church.

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Catholic AnswerThe Council of Trent was the most conservative Council in the sixteen centuries that the Christian Church had existed up until then, it broke almost no new ground, just reiterating, reinforcing, and detailing the constant teaching of the Church.

from

A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent

The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

from the Catholic Encyclopedia article on the Council of Trent

The Ecumenical Council of Trent has proved to be of the greatest importance for the development of the inner life of the Church. No council has ever had to accomplish its task under more serious difficulties, none has had so many questions of the greatest importance to decide. The assembly proved to the world that notwithstanding repeated apostasy in church life there still existed in it an abundance of religious force and of loyal championship of the unchanging principles of Christianity. Although unfortunately the council, through no fault of the fathers assembled, was not able to heal the religious differences of western Europe, yet the infallible Divine truth was clearly proclaimed in opposition to the false doctrines of the day, and in this way a firm foundation was laid for the overthrow of heresy and the carrying out of genuine internal reform in the Church.

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Council of Trent

Is the Catechism of the Council of Trent infallible?

The only thing that we know of that is defined as infallible is the Pope, he is infallible (preserved from error) when teaching to the entire Church on matters of faith and morals. In this light, the Catechism of the Council of Trent would indeed be considered infallible as it was the teaching of several Popes. However, it is not considered inerrant in the way the Bible is.

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Council of Trent

What happened with the indulgences at the Council of Trent?

Another answer from our community:

They were reaffirmed and explained. If Martin Luther had understood indulgences to begin with there would never have been any need for all this unpleasantness, or at least he wouldn't have had them to blame it on!

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The Council of Trent met over a period of 1545 to 1563 under 3 different popes. The decree on indulgences was covered near the end of the last session - the 25th.

The Council of TrentThe Twenty-Fifth SessionThe canons and decrees of the sacred and oecumenical Council of Trent,DECREE CONCERNING INDULGENCES.Whereas the power of conferring Indulgences was granted by Christ to the Church; and she has, even in the most ancient times, used the said power, delivered unto her of God; the sacred holy Synod teaches, and enjoins, that the use of Indulgences, for the Christian people most salutary, and approved of by the authority of sacred Councils, is to be retained in the Church; and It condemns with anathema those who either assert, that they are useless; or who deny that there is in the Church the power of granting them. In granting them, however, It desires that, in accordance with the ancient and approved custom in the Church, moderation be observed; lest, by excessive facility, ecclesastical discipline be enervated. And being desirous that the abuses which have crept therein, and by occasion of which this honourable name of Indulgences is blasphemed by heretics, be amended and corrected, It ordains generally by this decree, that all evil gains for the obtaining thereof,--whence a most prolific cause of abuses amongst the Christian people has been derived,--be wholly abolished. But as regards the other abuses which have proceeded from superstition, ignorance, irreverence, or from what soever other source, since, by reason of the manifold corruptions in the places and provinces where the said abuses are committed, they cannot conveniently be specially prohibited; It commands all bishops, diligently to collect, each in his own church, all abuses of this nature, and to report them in the first provincial Synod; that, after having been reviewed by the opinions of the other bishops also, they may forthwith be referred to the Sovereign Roman Pontiff, by whose authority and prudence that which may be expedient for the universal Church will be ordained; that this the gift of holy Indulgences may be dispensed to all the faithful, piously, holily, and incorruptly. Answer:

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Council of Trent

What were the practical changes to the Catholic Church after the Council of Trent?

Catholic AnswerThere were many practical changes to the Church after the Council of Trent, they mostly involved discipline of the clergy, education of the Church, and careful regulation of the Liturgy, etc. Here are two brief summaries:
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from the Catholic Encyclopedia article on the Council of TrentThe Ecumenical Council of Trent has proved to be of the greatest importance for the development of the inner life of the Church. No council has ever had to accomplish its task under more serious difficulties, none has had so many questions of the greatest importance to decide. The assembly proved to the world that notwithstanding repeated apostasy in church life there still existed in it an abundance of religious force and of loyal championship of the unchanging principles of Christianity. Although unfortunately the council, through no fault of the fathers assembled, was not able to heal the religious differences of western Europe, yet the infallible Divine truth was clearly proclaimed in opposition to the false doctrines of the day, and in this way a firm foundation was laid for the overthrow of heresy and the carrying out of genuine internal reform in the Church.
from
A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957
The Council of Trent
The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

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Council of Trent

What were the major reforms instituted by the Council of Trent?

Catholic AnswerThe Catholic Reform, known to protestant and secular scholars as the Counter-Reformation was a major effort to purge the Church of abuses by various individuals. It was primarily the work of several Popes who were instituting the decrees of the Council of Trent. The Council of Trent, contrary to modern opinion was far and away the most conservative Council that the Church has ever had. It broke no new ground, defined no new doctrines; but was basically a restating of previous Councils in more precise terms. In other words, by reiterating the number of books the Christian Church has always used, it simply reaffirmed the local Council of Rome held in the late fourth or fifth century. When it reaffirmed the seven sacraments, it was just explicating the constant teaching of the Church since the first century.

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from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent

The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.

192021
Council of Trent

1545 Roman Catholic Church group that met to discuss Church reform at Trent was?

Catholic AnswerIt is known as the Council of Trent, it was an ecumenical council, mostly of Bishops, and a few others such as abbots, called by the Holy Father, to reform the Church and combat protestantism.

from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Council of Trent

The 19th ecumenical council held at Trent in the Austrian Tyrol, 1545-63, summoned for the purpose of combating Protestantism and reforming the discipline of the Church; the longest and one of the most important of all general councils. It dealt in detail with the doctrinal innovations of the Reformers and with those gross abuses which gave them an opportunity to take root. It was one of the most important events of modern history and has had lasting effect. The principal dogmatic decisions were: the confirmation of the Nicene creed; the authenticity of the Latin Vulgate and the canonicity of all books contained therein and of them only; the definition of the doctrine of Original Sin; the precision of the doctrine of Justification, condemning justification by faith alone and imputation of grace; the condemnation of thirty errors about the sacraments; the definition of the Real Presence and of Transubstantiation as its mode: the precision of the doctrine of the sacraments of penance and Extreme Unction; the declaration that holy communion in both kinds was not necessary for lay-people and clerics not celebrating, Christ being received whole and entire under either species; the precision of doctrine concerning the sacrifice of the Mass and the sacraments of holy Orders and Matrimony; the affirmation of the doctrines of Purgatory, of the invocation of saints, and the veneration of them, their relics and images, and of Indulgences. Far-reaching decrees of reformation in discipline and morals were adopted involving many alterations in canon law, e.g. the decree Tametsi.
the council of Trent
The Council of Trent was a 1545 Roman Catholic church group that met to discuss church reform.

192021
Council of Trent

What century did the Council of Trent take place?

ANSWER: The Council of Trent took place in the mid-16th century, specifically between the years 1545 and 1563 in Trento and Bologna, northern Italy.

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Council of Trent
Catholicism

Why must the Church constantly reform itself?

The Catholic Church is the repository of great wealth and power, making control of the Church finances a tempting target. For this reason, the Church must be continuously introspective and constantly look for ways to improve its governance. In the Middle Ages, cardinals are known to have bought votes so as to become pope and enjoy the wealth and power that comes with the position. This has ceased to be a problem in recent times, but scandals have surfaced in the Vatican Bank and other levels of the hierarchy, requiring vigilance and financial control.

The Church's attitudes to sexual abuse by clergy and lay officials have been shown to be wanting. Once again, this is an area in which the Church must reform itself.

001
Reformation History
Council of Trent

What is the difference between the Catholic Reformation and Protestant Reformation?

The difference between them is that the Catholic Reformation was the response to the Protestant Reformation. The Protestanst accused the Catholic Church of indulgences (paying for your sins to essentially be erased), being able to pay for your religious post, and to be able to have more than one post at a time, and many other scandals. Martin Luther nailed his 95 Thesis to the Church door in Wittenberg and from then, the Protestant Reformation started and eventually, the Church held the Council of Trent, whose goal was to purify the Church. The Jesuits were formed from the Catholic Reformation. The Jesuits were formed by St. Ignatius of Loyola and they converted people to Catholicism. They were considered one of the bright lights of the Catholic Reformation.

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Catholicism
Virgin Mary
Council of Trent

Was Mary declared a virgin during the Council of Trent?

Catholic AnswerThe Council of Trent addressed issues raised by the heretics who were confronting the Church at that time. It was probably the most conservative Council in the Church's history, as it did not address any new issues, only restated constant teaching of the Church. However, it only addressed those issues with which the protestants were objecting. The perpetual virginity of the Blessed Virgin was not one of those issues, all of the reformers believed in it fervently. It had been a constant teaching of the Church from the very beginning and no one, not even the protestant heretics thought to change it. Martin Luther was vehement in his defense of Our Blessed Lady.

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The Perpetual virginity of Mary

Pope Paul IV, in his Constitution, Cum Quorumdam Hominum, of 1555, expressed the constant teaching of the Catholic Church concerning both the virgin birth of Jesus Christ and the perpetual virginity of Mary:

We question and admonish all those who . . . have asserted, taught, and believed . . . that our Lord . . . was not conceived from the Holy Spirit according to the flesh in the womb of the Blessed Mary ever Virgin, but, as other men, from the see of Joseph . . . or that the same Blessed Virgin Mary is not truly the mother of God and did not retrain her virginity intact before the birth, in the birth, and perpetually after the birth. (In Neuner and Dupuis, The Christian Faith, 217. See CCC, pars 484-486, 496-498, 502-506, 510, 723 (for the virgin birth); pars 499-501, 507, 510, 721 (for the perpetual virginity of Mary))

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Council of Trent

What was a recommendation of the Council of Trent regarding music for the church?

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Catholic AnswerThere was one sentence, in all the documents of the Council of Trent that addressed music, it was towards the end of the 22nd Session, which dealt with the Holy Mass: They shall also banish from churches all those kinds of music, in which, whether by the organ, or in the singing, there is mixed up any thing lascivious or impure; as also all secular actions; vain and therefore profane conversations, all walking about, noise, and clamour, that so the house of God may be seen to be, and may be called, truly a house of prayer.

In the Middle Ages, "tropes" had developed, these were additions to the chant which was native to the Latin liturgy. the Council of Trent banned them completely, although it did allow polyphony.

In the matter of music, polyphonic music was permitted in addition to the use of traditional chant as long as the texts of polyphonic pieces were not unduly obscured. Tropes were banned entirely and the sequence was suppressed except for a handful of favorites.

.Catholic AnswerThe Council of Trent was the Catholic Church's response to the disaster of the protestant revolt and the problems within the Church at that time. It was important to music as it spelled out exactly what was permitted to be celebrated in a Church and at Mass, and what was recommended (Gregorian Chant).

from the Catholic Encyclopedia article on the Council of Trent

The Ecumenical Council of Trent has proved to be of the greatest importance for the development of the inner life of the Church. No council has ever had to accomplish its task under more serious difficulties, none has had so many questions of the greatest importance to decide. The assembly proved to the world that notwithstanding repeated apostasy in church life there still existed in it an abundance of religious force and of loyal championship of the unchanging principles of Christianity. Although unfortunately the council, through no fault of the fathers assembled, was not able to heal the religious differences of western Europe, yet the infallible Divine truth was clearly proclaimed in opposition to the false doctrines of the day, and in this way a firm foundation was laid for the overthrow of heresy and the carrying out of genuine internal reform in the Church.

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