Gulf War

The Persian Gulf War took place from August 2, 1990 to February 28, 1991 and is often referred to as the Gulf War or Desert Storm.

3,918 Questions
War and Military History
Gulf War

What are the causes of the Persian Gulf War of 1990-1991?

Answer 1

Saddam Hussein ordered Iraqi troops to invade the sovereign nation of Kuwait to plunder its wealth, oil was involved in an indirect way in that most of the Kuwaiti wealth was due to oil production. But the world stepped in when an aggressive dictatorship invaded an established nation with the purpose of seizing its land and resources.

Answer 2

Well, the first reason was because Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990. Kuwait is a tiny but wealthy neighbor of Iraq in the gulf. Iraq invaded them in order to plunder its wealth and because of its westernized culture, and the fact that they had no real way of defending themselves against such a powerful adversary.

Answer 3

Operation Desert Storm, also known as the "100 Hour War" was to eject Iraqi forces from the nation of Kuwait. Which was done between (approximately) 15 January to February 26 of 1991. The dictionary defines a military campaign as a military operation with a specific objective and lasting normally only one season in the field. This definition applies to Operation Desert Storm; which also had a US Postage Stamp designating Operation Desert Storm in about 1992. Military service personnel were awarded campaign ribbons for service in SOUTHWEST ASIA for this particular military campaign.

Answer 4

Iraq invaded Kuwait. As Kuwait is a big oil supplier to the West, the powers that be in the West decided to do something about it.

Answer 5

Saddam Hussein the dictator of Iraq ordered his military into Kuwait because he wanted to make the Kuwaitis pay for the Iran-Iraq War.

Answer 6

This was to protect the Kuwait people from the Iraqis when they tried to steal their oil. Saddam Hussein was greedy.

Answer 7

Iraq, under Saddam Hussein, attacked Kuwait. Kuwait was (still is) an oil-rich nation, and of great interest to the United States. At the time, the United States was actually justified in intervening in this event, because one of our major national interests was at stake. This was a clear-cut aggressive act by Iraq that warranted action.

Answer 8

In 1991, the United States led the coalition in a war against Iraq.

Iraq was told to leave the country of Kuwait. They refused. The US/Coalition removed them by force, during Operation Desert Storm (Jan-Feb 1991).

Answer 9

In 1990 Iraq moved into the country of Kuwait. The US told them to leave Kuwait. In 1990 the US commenced the buildup of military forces to remove Irag from Kuwait, under In Feb 1991, Iraq retreated from Kuwait; Desert Storm was successfully completed.

Answer 10

Iraq, without justification or excuse, invaded and conquered Kuwait in order to gain control of its oil wealth and, quite possibly, as a prelude to doing the same thing to Saudi Arabia. The United States, with modest help from allies and other Arab states assembled a large army and forced Iraq out.

  • The gulf war was caused in the most part by Saddam Hussein's need for oil. He had amassed a huge debt with western Europe during the Iran-Iraq war and needed some way of re-paying that money. Hussein had also caught Kuwait exceeding quota's set out by OPEC which drove the price of oil down and making Iraq lose money. Iraq did also not have direct access to the Persian Gulf which would help in the exporting and importing of goods.
  • Saddam considered Kuwait as being a rogue providence. He also disliked Kuwait due to the fact it is mainly Shi'ite. From everything I have read, Saddam apparently brought it up to one of his closest allies, the French, and received little to no resistance on the thought of an invasion. During this period, the Iraq government was the top buyer of French military goods and the French had the majority of oil contracts in the country. Saddam was on the verge of canceling the Russian contracts and awarding them to the French. Saddam also accused the Kuwait government of stealing oil from the oil rich Basra area. Apparently their rigs were very close to the borders and Saddam felt that the oil was coming from Iraq's reserves.
  • America's involvement in the war was started by Kuwait asking for help getting invaders out of their country. The Gulf War, aka Desert Storm, was the result of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.

Answer 11

There were no innocent parties in that war. The whole thing started when Kuwait used a "slant drill"--a machine that can drill an oil well at an angle--to tap the al-Rumaila oilfield. There was historical enmity as well--Iraq had borrowed $14 billion from Kuwait to pay for the Iran-Iraq War. They were going to attempt to pay the debt by forcing the price of oil up, but Kuwait dumped a LOT of oil on the market, causing the price to go down. On July 25, 1990, US Ambassador to Iraq April Glaspie told Saddam Hussein, "we have no opinion on Arab-Arab issues, such as your border disagreement with Kuwait." Saddam translated that to mean, "we don't care what you do" and, on August 2, annexed Kuwait into Iraq.

Minor Correction Desert Storm is often thought to be another name for the Gulf War, but it is not. It was the second phase of the Coalition strategy to oust Iraq from Kuwait. The first phase was to defend Saudi Arabia, and it was called Operation Desert Shield which lasted for months. Desert Storm began when the first bombs were dropped on Baghdad, and bombings continued daily for more months. After Coalition forces crossed the Saudi-Iraqi border, Basra was quickly captured and Operation Desert Storm was concluded after a few days.

And another thing..... The causes of the Gulf War can be traced back to World War 1, and the betrayal of the Arabs by the British and French. For siding with the Allies against the Ottoman Empire, Prince Faisal was allowed to have Iraq, but Kuwait which had previously been part of this land was not included.

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Gulf War
Iraq War
Iraq
Saddam Hussein

What kind of leader was Saddam Hussein in war?

A Dictator!

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Gulf War

Is there a list of people who fought in desert storm?

Yes. If you go to desert-storm.com it will tell u eveything u need to know

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War and Military History
Economics
Gulf War

Did oil prices go up during the gulf war?

Which Gulf War? 1. Iran-Iraq War 1980-1988 2. Operation Desert Storm Jan/Feb '91 3. Operation Iraqi Freedom 2003-

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Gulf War

Why did the 1991 Gulf War start?

Iraq led by Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait.
The 1991 Gulf War started as a swarm of Apache (Longbow)Gunships destroyed two of Saddam Huissain's radio stations. There were many Apaches invovled and the war lasted some years.

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Gulf War

What countries were involved in the Gulf War?

United states:575,000 troops

Saudi Arabia:52,000 troops (only 20-40,000 took part in the Liberation of Kuwait & Battle of Khafji)

Turkey:50,000 troops (did not take part in any battle) The United Kingdom:43,000 troops Operation Granby Egypt:35,000 troops United Arab Emirates:4,300 troops Oman:6,300 troops

France:14,663 troops Operation Daguet Spain:500 troops Syria:14,500 troops Kuwait:9,900 troops Bangladesh:2,000 troops Pakistan:5,500 troops Canada:2,000 troops Operation FRICTION Niger:500 troops Bahrain:200 troops Czechoslovakia:200 troops

Netherlands: 600 troops

Honduras:150 troops

Click on the link below for more information.
The countries involved in the 1990 Gulf war were Iraq, Kurwait and America.

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War and Military History
Gulf War
Oil Spills

Was first gulf war justified?

The first Gulf war; Desert Shield and Desert Storm, were very justified. Iraq invaded and occupied Kuwait, and terrorized the nation. Iraq threatened to attack Saudi Arabia. The war was necessary to defend Saudi Arabia and free Kuwait from a murderous tryant--Saddam Hussein of Iraq.

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Military Awards and Medals
Gulf War

Who are the army bronze star recipients of the gulf war?

The Bronze Star medal has been awarded to several thousand US service members during the Gulf War. Not possible to list them all.

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US Presidents
Gulf War
Iraq War

What was the aftermath and implications of the Gulf War?

Sanctions reduced Iraq- The nation in the forefront of Middle Eastern secularism, which sported the finest schools, universities, hospitals and infrastructure and reduced it to rubble. This led the once popularist dictator into a frenzy, and with no money flowing into the nation the schools, hospitals and infrastructure wasn't rebuilt, the nation starved, got dumber and cancer rates from 'depleted' uranium went through the roof- now with no jobs in the country, because theres no money to pay with you might as well join the army/republican guard/Baath party and tow the party line because that was really the only profitable thing to do in Iraq between then and now. A nation that hated America was now developed, the USAF mastered its bombing techniques it learned from Cologne, Hanoi, Nuremberg flattened the entire place and convinced the media that 'smart' bombs were the arsenal of the future, it was funny how surprised the American public was to see resistance in Iraq, considering they did destroy most of the dams, water supplies, destroyed sewage facilities in order to spread disease, destroyed hospitals, schools, oil wells in order to destabilize the country, and the least they could've done was overthrow Saddam while they were there, instead of not providing them with the money to rebuild in the hope that this would drive the Iraqi people into rebellion. Guess what, you need money to buy weapons in a dictatorship, no money = no weapons = no resistance. The list continues, that war has a lot of sh*t that went down in it, and let me tell you in 20 years time, when this will all be declassified you will find a lot of inconsistencies with the conflict, whatever you do don't sit there shaking your head saying 'conspiracy theorist' or 'liberal' or 'lefties', because the same people were shaking their heads in Vietnam calling those who questioned the actions of the US government the same thing, and look at what were continuing to find out to this day (eg gulf of tonkin). The greatest implication of the Gulf War in today's context was the Gulf War 2, and don't you dare hail it as a success, 11,000 civilians dead, 45,000 Iraqi soldiers died defending their country from an illegal invasion is not the price to pay to overthrow a regime, starving millions and killing hundreds of thousands over a ten year period was a worse one. The implications of the Gulf War were detrimental for world peace and like Vietnam we will suffer from it for the next 25-30 years, it really brought to light what the US government was prepared to do to lower the price of the black gold Wow. Crosley left this little bit out of his emotional tirade, so I thought I'd share it: The people of Kuwait are enjoying freedom once again after being liberated by a UN sanctioned international coalition from an illegal invasion.

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History of the United States
War and Military History
Gulf War

When was the Persian Gulf War?

Date August 2, 1990 - February 28, 1991. See: Iran-Iraq War 1980-1988

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War and Military History
Gulf War

How many soldiers died in the Gulf War?

Revised answer

the number of deaths suffered by British troops in the 1st Gulf war is 47.

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Gulf War

Which country declared the Gulf War?

Since it started with the invasion of Kuwait I would have to say Iraq but if your looking at the coalition forces that drove Iraq out of Kuwait then it would be the U.N.

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Gulf War
Iraq
Kuwait

Why was Kuwait the target of invasion by Iraq?

The Iraqi government had long considered Kuwait a province of Iraq and its oil wealth could help to pay off the debts that Iraq had incurred from its Iran-Iraq War. Kuwait also had no means of resisting invasion. (Its army is tiny by comparison with Iraq's.)

It's been suggested that when drawing up the borders for when Iraq became semi autonomous like the British Dominions, the boundary's commission pencil that drew the line, when scaled up, meant two miles that should of been part of Iraq, was in Kuwait. But Iraq didn't stop at that.

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Gulf War

Famous people in gulf war?

Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini & Iraq's Saddam Hussein

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War and Military History
Gulf War

What was the importance of the gulf war?

Operation Desert Storm (Jan/Feb 1991) completed it's mission of removing Iraqi Forces from Kuwait, quickly, and with minimal US casualties (less than 200 fatalities).

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History of the United States
War and Military History
Gulf War
War of 1812

Who fought the War of 1812?

United States of America and Great Britain.

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War and Military History
Gulf War

What were the other causes of the Gulf War?

The first gulf war in 1990/1991 was caused by Saddam Hussein invading Kuwait on 2 August 1990, and taking over that country. Many human rights violations were reported, and we adviced him that he needed to get out by 16 Jan 1991 or face a US led attack.

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Gulf War

What country and state was the gulf war fought?

country:The ground offensive was in Kuwait and Iraq, however there was also the Battle of Khafji in Saudi Arabia, when Iraq captured the Saudi city of Khafji.

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War and Military History
Gulf War

What were the consequences of the Gulf War?

Following uprisings in the north and south, Iraqi no-fly zones were established to help protect the Shi'ite and Kurdish groups in South and North Iraq, respectively. These no-fly zones (originally north of the 36th parallel and south of the 32nd parallel) were monitored mainly by the United States and the United Kingdom, though France also participated. Combined, they flew more sorties over Iraq in the eleven years following the war than were flown during the war. These sorties dropped bombs nearly every other day against surface-to-air missiles and anti-aircraft guns which engaged the patrolling aircraft. However, the greatest amount of bombs was dropped during two sustained bombing campaigns: Operation Desert Strike, which lasted a few weeks in September 1996, and Operation Desert Fox, in December 1998. Operation Northern Watch, the no-fly zone covering the Kurds, allowed the population to focus on developing security and infrastructure, which was reflected after Saddam's fall in 2003 by a much more progressive and sustainable region (when compared to the rest of the country following Operation Iraqi Freedom). Operation Southern Watch, on the other hand, was not successful in providing the Shi'ite population the same opportunity. Widespread infrastructure destruction during the ground war hurt the Iraqi population. Years after the war, electricity production was less than a quarter of its pre-war level. The destruction of water treatment facilities caused sewage to flow directly into the Tigris River, from which civilians drew drinking water, resulting in widespread disease. Funds provided by Western nations to help combat the problem were diverted instead to maintaining Saddam's military control over the country. Economic sanctions were kept in place following the war, pending a weapons inspection with which Iraq never fully cooperated as it accused the UN inspectors of spying (something which was later proven to be at least partially true). Iraq was later allowed to import certain products under the UN's Oil for Food program. A 1998 UNICEF report found that the sanctions resulted in an increase to 90,000 deaths per year. Many argue that the sanctions on Iraq and the American military presence in Saudi Arabia contributed to an increasingly negative image of the United States in the Arab world. A United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) on weapons was established, to monitor Iraq's compliance with restrictions on weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missiles. Iraq accepted some and refused other weapons inspections. The team found some evidence of biological weapons programs at one site and non-compliance at many other sites. In 1997, Iraq expelled all U.S. members of the inspection team, alleging that the United States was using the inspections as a front for espionage; members of UNSCOM were in regular contact with various intelligence agencies to provide information on weapons sites back and forth. The team returned for an even more turbulent time period between 1997 and 1999; one member of the weapons inspection team, U.S. Marine Scott Ritter, resigned in 1998, alleging that the Clinton administration was blocking investigations because they did not want a full-scale confrontation with Iraq. In 1999, the team was replaced by UNMOVIC, which began inspections in 2002. In 2002, Iraq � and especially Saddam Hussein � became targets in the United States' War on Terrorism, leading to the 2003 invasion of Iraq, led by the United States and, to a lesser extent, the United Kingdom. The People's Republic of China (whose army in many ways resembled the Iraqi army) was surprised at the performance of American technology on the battlefield. The swiftness of the coalition victory resulted in an overall change in Chinese military thinking and began a movement to technologically modernize the People's Liberation Army. These things irritated Islamic Extremism, although it had already been there to start with, strong as ever. The change of face by Saddam's secular regime did little to draw support from Islamics groups. However, it, combined with the Saudi Arabian alliance with the United States and Saudi Arabia being seen as being on the same side of Israel dramatically eroded that regime's legitimacy. Activity of Islamics groups against the Saudi regime increased dramatically. The presence of American troops in Saudi Arabia, the invasion of Iraq, and the subsequent blockade were some of the grievances listed by Osama bin Laden in his 1998 Fatwa. In part to win back favor with Islamics groups Saudi Arabia greatly increased funding to those that would support the regime. Throughout the newly independent states of Central Asia the Saudis paid for the distribution of millions of Qur'ans and the building of hundreds of mosques for extremist groups. In Afghanistan the Saudi regime became a leading patron of the Taliban in that nation's civil war, and one of the few foreign countries to officially recognize the government.

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War and Military History
Gulf War

How many Americans died in the Gulf War?

Gulf War casualty numbers are controversial. Coalition military deaths have been reported to be around 378, but the DoD reports that US forces suffered 147 battle-related and 235 non-battle-related deaths, plus one F/A-18 Hornet Navy pilot listed as MIA. The UK suffered 47 deaths, the Arab countries lost 39 men (18 Saudis, 10 Egyptians, 6 from the UAE, 3 Syrians, and 1 Kuwaiti), and France lost 2 men. The largest single loss of Coalition forces happened on February 25, 1991, when an Iraqi Al-Hussein missile hit an American military barrack in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia killing 28 U.S. Army Reservists from Pennsylvania.

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Gulf War
US Foreign Policy

Why did the US go to War with Iraq in 1991?

Because Iraq invaded Kuwait and Kuwait is an ally of the US. Iraq's invasion also was a major threat to Saudi Arabia and under no condition could the Western world allow such a concentration of the world oil reserves to be controlled by Saddam Hussein.

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Miscellaneous
Gulf War

What was the location of desert storm?

My stepdad was in the Navy for Desert Storm. It started in Kuwait and the Iraqi forces were destroyed or pushed back to Iraq.

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War and Military History
Gulf War
Kuwait

What were the effects on Kuwait after the Gulf War?

it made it into one of the best countries in the middle east (added 2/8/2009) It also changed the population of the country from a very high population of Palestinian, Jordanian and stateless (i.e. Palestinian, undocumented) of around 700K pre Aug 2nd 1990 to 30-35,000 in March 1991. This is largely because of support of a percentage of the Palestinian population for the Iraqi regime. The Kuwaitis resented the abuse of what was seen as their hospitality and support of the Palestinian cause and (rightly, in many cases) felt betrayed. This shifted the nationality dynamic between pre and post war Kuwait. Westerners were afforded a higher status due to their contribution to liberation, and Jordanian/Palestinian's were either deported or left voluntarily, the few remaining being relegated to a lower position on the social scale.

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Gulf War
US Foreign Policy

Why did the US get involved in the Persian Gulf War?

The war started when Iraq invaded Kuwait. This was seen as an aggressive action, and after attempts to restore peace, the UN approved a war. America, along with a coalition of other countries, decided to liberate Kuwait. There was also the matter that both of these countries had huge deposits of oil.

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WW2 Allied Powers
Gulf War
US Army
Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages

How old is Norman Schwarzkopf?

US general Norman Schwarzkopf Jr. was 78 years old when he died on December 27, 2012 (birthdate: August 22, 1934).

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