High School

In some parts of the world, high school is the name given to a facility that provides secondary education.

Asked in Georgia (US State), Online and Correspondence Schools, High School

Is Cornerstone Christian Correspondence School in Townsend Georgia accredited and how to contact them?

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Cornerstone Christian Correspondence School is not an accredited school. IT does not meet government standards and the diploma will not be accepted by any state colleges, universities or military service. The Diploma issued by Cornerstone Christian Correspondence School is not valid for entry into the Military Services - this school has been reviewed over the past year and was evaluated to not be equivalent of even a GED and placed on a "Not Valid for Entry" list. Address: Cornerstone Christian Correspondence School, 3149 U S Highway 17, Townsend, GA 31331 Phone (912) 832-3834 or (912) 832-6663 Website URL: Cornerstonechristianschools.org Many diploma mills claim to be "accredited," but the accreditation is from a bogus, but official-sounding, agency they invented. Some diploma mills have slick websites, and a "dot-edu" Web address doesn't guarantee legitimacy You can use the Internet to check if a school is accredited by a legitimate organization at a new database of accredited academic institutions, posted by the U.S. Department of Education at ope.ed.gov/accreditation. From other contributors: No it is not an accredited school, I work for a University and the Department of Education does not recognize their HS diplomas, so a college can not use it as a proof of graduation. It may be accredited according to them, but according to the Department of Education it is not and they are the ones who need to recognize it to be eligible to attend a college. This high school diploma is not accepted in my county either, they said there's no one monitoring you when taking this test so it is not accepted. I got a diploma from Cornerstone back in 2003. I was so excited that i was the first person to graduate high school from my family in a long time. Now I'm in college in California. The college has a list of schools they won't accept diplomas from and Cornerstone is on that list. Imagine how upset i was, right? Well now the school says if the diploma has an impressed seal on it they might accept it, if not, I'll have to go get my GED. Not something i'd like. The point is that to the best of my memory Cornerstone is accredited BUT that doesn't mean that if you outside of Georgia YOUR school will accept it. The laws and rules of what they will or won't accept are VERY different from state to state. And I've learned that now. So if I were you I would be cautious before assuming that the college you want to go to will accept it just because it's accredited or says diploma. A lot of the people graduating from Cornerstone are not even in Georgia. NO their diplomas may be accredited but they are not recognized by the Department of Education. So a University doesn't acknowledge this as a proof of graduation and you will not be able to enter college. I work for a University and one of the individuals that tried to apply here told me he knows others who are having this same problem. Schools, even colleges, can be accredited but that doesn't guarantee that the DOE recognizes the schools credentials. After two semesters,with Kaplan university they pulled me out of classes because my diploma with Cornerstone was not acceptable. Now the university wants me to repay grant money because of it. What now ? Cornerstone Christian Correspondence School is not a real diploma. Cornerstone is not even an accredited school. Some colleges like the community one will accept it but a university will not accept it. I have a cornerstone but I went back to school and graduated from Marshall High School. So try to get your GED. Or if you not too old go back to school because that cornerstone is worthless! It is not valid as in accredited high school diploma for admission to most colleges. If Cornerstone Christian Correspondence School is not accredited how come it is that the state of Michigan paid for my cousin to get her diploma through this school and then the a college accepted it as a diploma. (It probably hasn't been caught yet) The school does not have the appropriate accreditation.
Asked in Law & Legal Issues, Colleges and Universities, High School

Can you drop out of college at any time?

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Yes, you may drop out at anytime, however; if you plan on withdrawing out and have taken out student loans/grants there is a predetermined time frame in which the school has to return any payments received. (Ask your school counselor to find out how many weeks you have if this is something you are interested in.) If the school is required to return funds then you will only be responsible for the difference of what was spent. If you do not drop out soon enough then you will still have to pay your student loans back in full (in installemts unless you can afford to pay in full). If you have paid out of pocket for you tuition then the same applies they will refund you any overage you have paid if you withdraw within their specified time period. Otherwise your payment will not be reimbursed.
Asked in Education, High School , US Colleges and Universities

Do colleges look at being held back in high school?

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No. Most of them usally only care that you're already there at the college and expect you to apply yourself and do your best.
Asked in Capital Punishment, High School

Is Columbine High School still open?

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Yep, and it's a really good school.:)
Asked in Education, High School

What is the Largest high school enrollment in the united states?

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victoriaville has 5,000 students enrolled Cypress Bay High School in Weston, FL currently has 5,492 students. Plano East, Tx--- 6171 Plano,Tx ---5240
Asked in High School , School Uniforms

How do you wash a school blazer?

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It depends which fabric was used to make the blazer. Cotton Blazers can be safely washed in cold water and very low dryer temperatures and then hung out on a hanger to finish drying so it can be pressed when it is slightly damp. If it is wool, rayon or a wool blend you must take it to the dry cleaners. Water will ruin any blazer that has wool in it. A polyester blazer can be washed in cool water and a low dryer temperature. Beware of using spot removers. You must test the spot remover in the inside of the blazer first. Just a drop. You cannot put store bought spot remover on wool blazers. The best rule is "if in doubt take it to the cleaners" because it cost more to replace a school blazer than it does to pay for the dry cleaning or washing bill. Consult your house parent if you are in a boarding school because the school may have an agreement with a local dry cleaners for discounts for the students.
Asked in College Applications and Entrance Requirements, High School

What do you get when you graduate from high school?

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You receive your high school diploma which certifies that you completed high school.
Asked in High School

What is so bad about John Bowne High School?

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Nothing really I don't know why people say its so bad -_-
Asked in Science, High School

When does a new semester start?

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Usually the semester starts in August but I know some schools that don't have summer break.
Asked in Sports, High School

How long until a transfer student can play sports?

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The NCAA requires student athletes transferring from one Division I school to another Division I school to sit out one year to regain eligibility at the new school. A student athlete can transfer from one division to another without a one-year probation period. Of course the NCAA does have the ability to waive the probabtion period on a case by case basis.
Asked in Education, High School

When is high School Detective 3 coming out?

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it already is out. i dont know where it is but is is out
Asked in High School

What does high school suspension do to your future?

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it goes on your permanent record and can effect college
Asked in Ghana, Senior Secondary Certificate SSC, High School

Top 20 secondary schools in Ghana?

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St.marys boy's secondary school-apowa,takoradi
Asked in Education, High School

Compare a school morning assembly?

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respected principal all teacher and my dear fellows assalamo alaikum first of all i welcome you for gathering here iin the morning asembly as u know our merciful allah is the creator of every thing so ipray to allah i would like to call (anyone who is perfect in talavat)
Asked in India, High School

Anglo-Indian 10th exam timetable?

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it is already in the Tamil news paper (Daily Thanti)
Asked in Toys, iPod, High School

Is there Surviving High School DS?

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Yeah but it's for DSiware, it's being made this year
Asked in Football - American, Track Events, High School

What is the average 40 yard dash for a starting out high school cornerback?

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Anything faster than a 4.60 second forty yard dash is excellent. A high school cornerback would be expected to run at least a 4.80 second forty yard dash, though playing speed is much more important than timed speed on a track. A high school cornerback who would like to play major college football (Division 1A [FBS]) would probably need to run a sub-4.60 forty, while elite prospects would need to run a 4.50 forty or better.
Asked in High School

How does honor classes help in high school?

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Honors classes do more than just prepare you for college, they show that you have what it takes to be successful. The attachment of "Honors" to a class usually denotes that it is a more advanced class for a select number of students. These classes usually involve more work, but they also pay off with a greater understanding of the topic as well as a notch on the transcript. Even students who do not usually consider themselves the "Honors" students can benefit from one of these classes. They can help you by improving your study skills as well as helping you becoming more self reliant. Colleges also look at these classes to see whether a student has challenged him or herself throughout their high school career. In all, honors classes can do a lot to help you in high school.
Asked in High School

Why is popularity so important in school?

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Because it just is..stick with your true friends and stay yourself...trust me!
Asked in Online and Correspondence Schools, High School

Is Aspen High School accredited?

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The online Aspen High School is accredited, but by 2 suspicious accreditation agencies. The Capital Network for Distance Learning Programs (CNDLP) is a self-proclaimed "self-accrediting agency" by its own definition (see the Related Link below), which means no neutral agency has evaluated its course materials nor agenda. The other "agency", "American Accreditation Council for Higher Education (AACHC)" has an impressive sounding name, but no information can be found concerning its program.
Asked in Job Training and Career Qualifications, Job Search, Education, High School

If you get kicked out of your high school can you still get your high school diploma at a different school?

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Answer 1: I guess so, if they let you in and you don't get kicked out again. Answer 2: First answerer seems unsure. I am not. It absolutely does not matter how or from where you get your high school diploma, as long as you at least get it. Somehow. Don't just let it go. One cannot get even the most basic of jobs, in life, without at least a high school diploma. Truth is, things, today, are such that one can't get any of the decent jobs, in life, without a bachelors degree, too. But one thing at a time. If you've been kicked-out of your high school, fear not. Yes, another high school in your school district may take you; however, they all talk to one another, plus whatever got you kicked-out will be on your transcript; and so another high school may only allow you to enter on probationary status; or you may be required, by your school district, to go to night school. You could also move to an entirely different school district, but, again, they, too, will require a copy of your transcript which will reflect what happened. Before I tell you how you can easily get your high school diploma, no matter what has happened, let me first tell you this: High schools, today, are booting kids out of school for almost no reason anymore. I'm 56 years old, and while I agree that it being almost impossible to get kicked-out of high school, no matter what one did, back then, was probably not the right approach... ...today's high schools and their zero-tolerance policies for things kicking kids out for minor infractions, or having them arrested, is just plain wrong. I don't know what the questioner did to get kicked-out, but I'll bet it was something for which no one could get kicked out a mere generation ago. There's a fellow named John Whitehead, of the Rutherford Insitutue (which I find to be a little bit too conservative, for my tastes; but occasionally we agree) who just made a vodcast about a very similar subject. I'll put the link to it in the "sources and related links" section of this page, below. I would most strongly recommend that the questioner consult with an attorney at law and determine if the expulsion was lawful. Then again, it may be a battle too emotional and expensive to fight, and that's okay, too. Regardless, though, anyone who is kicked-out (or drops-out) of his/her high school may recover, and emerge, in the end, none the worse for wear, by simply getting an online high school diploma... ...however, not just any online high school will do. There are tons of completely bogus online high schools out there. Only those that are "regionally" accredited will do. Remember that! All US local city/county school district public K-12 schools are "regionally" accredited by one of the US's six big "regional" accreditors approved by the US Department of Education (USDE). Yes, there's such a thing as USDE-approved "national" accreditation; and at the college (post-secondary) level, there's a legitimate debate about whether "regional" or "national" accreditation is better. However, at the high school (secondary) level, only "regional" accreditation will do. Accept nothing less. Some US states have special online high school programs in place -- some of them especially for those who are either kicked-out or drop-out of high school -- which allow anyone who was once a public high school student in said state to pick-up where they left off using one of the special state online high school programs. Some of them are even free. And some of them will even allow the student to avail himself/herself of said program until their 21 or sometimes even 25. And, in such cases, the state programs are always "regionally" accredited. Do check your local state department of education's website and see if such a program is offered. If it's not, that's okay... there are many "regionally" accredited online high schools out there. Some are fairly expensive, but at least one that I like and often recommend is pretty affordable. It's called "James Madison High School," and it's operated by Ashworth College. I've put a link to it in the "sources and related links" section, below. Ashworth College is only nationally accredited, but its high school, James Madison, is regionally accredited. And its priced about right. Be sure to take the college-bound track, just in case you decide to go to college someday. So that no one will accuse me of being a shill for Ashworth, its direct competitor at the college level is Penn Foster College; and its high school is also regionally accredited. Do check it out, too. Dr. John Bear (who has written many books on distance learning, and who is a devoted anti-degree-mill/anti-diploma-mill activist who has testified before Congress about it, and who has written, along with an FBI agent, the definitive book on degree mills) has released a book on getting aschool diploma by non-traditional means that's just excellent. It's actually written by Tom Nixon, the guy I discuss in the next paragraph, but with Bear's oversight. I could not more strongly recommend it. I've put a link to it in the "sources and related links," below. There's also a fellow out there named Tom Nixon who has written one of the best books out there on getting a credible online high diploma. I've put a link to his book, on Amazon, in the "sources and related links," below; and he also has a companion (to the book) website which lists all the best online high schools of which he's aware; and I know he keeps it up-to-date. I've put a link to that down in the "sources and related links" section, too. However, beware: Tom is willing to list some online high schools on his website which are credible, but not accredited. There aren't many of them, but last time I looked at his site, I spotted a few. And I know why he listed them; I'm very familiar with them, and I agree that they're credible... ...but the problem remains that if one's high school diploma is not from a "regionally" accredited high school -- regardless whether it's of the online or in-classroom type -- then one ends-up with a high school diploma that won't be accepted in most places, for most purposes. In the US, all high school diplomas MUST be from "regionally" accredited high schools, regardless whether they're of the online or in-classroom type. Period. If you get kicked-out of high school, or drop-out; and then if you can't get back in; or if you can, but at another high school that will see what happend on your transcript and may then somehow hold it against you... ...then, by all means, stop beating your head against the wall and just sign-up with a regionally-accredited online high school, and finish your high school studies while sitting -- even in your underwear, if you like -- at your computer. As long as the online high school is "regionally" (and not "nationally") accredited, then its diploma, when you finally graduate, will be just as acceptable, for any and all purposes for which a high school diploma is required in life, as the one you would have earned from the high school you either got kicked-out of, or that you dropped-out of. So, relax. Everything'll be fine. Just don't get ripped-off by a diploma mill; and the way you do that is by ensuring that the school in which you enroll is, indeed, "regionally" accredited. And never take the school's word for it. Always hunt-down-like-a-dog the website of the regional accreditor that covers the state in which the online high school is geographically located, and verify that said school is, indeed, regionally accredited. And if a school is both regionally and nationally accredited (like Ashworth's James Madison, for example) fear not. My saying, earlier, herein, that only "regional" accreditation will do does not preclude a school from being both. As long as the school's at least "regionally" accredited, then it's perfectly fine if it's also "nationally" accredited. Just make sure that it's not only nationally accredited.