Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones

Cyclone is the generic term for a low-pressure system with surface winds spinning in a circular motion. The six main types of cyclones are polar cyclones, polar lows, extratropical cyclones, subtropical cyclones, tropical cyclones, and mesocyclones. When the winds reach speeds of 74 miles per hour, a tropical cyclone might be called a hurricane or typhoon, depending on the region where it formed.

23,236 Questions
Meteorology and Weather
Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Tornadoes

How are tornadoes and hurricanes similar?

Hurricanes and tornadoes are both natural disasters that produce powerful, destructive winds that spiral cyclonically inwards via low pressure (clockwise in the southern hemisphere, counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere).

Hurricanes have a calm, clear eye at the center of rotation and it is believed that many tornadoes have a similar feature.

Both have scales for rating intensity:

  • Tornadoes are rated on the Fujita scale from F0 to F5 based on damage, some countries, including the United States have upgraded to the Enhanced Fujita scale (EF0 to EF5).
  • Hurricanes are rated on the Saffir-Simpson scale from Category 1 to Category 5.
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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Tornadoes
Survival Tips

Where is the safest place to go during a tornado?

Generally speaking, you want to be as low to the ground as possible during severe tornado conditions. A basement is ideal, as particularly powerful tornadoes can tear buildings apart. If you don’t have access to an underground space, being near the center of the building is the next best plan, staying away from any windows, as flying debris is one of the greatest dangers during these storms. If your interior bathroom has a bathtub, that can also be a sturdy place to stay safe.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones

What is the difference between Hurricanes and Cyclones?

- Hurricane:

A violent wind which has a circular movement, especially found in the West Atlantic Ocean. A hurricane is actually a violent storm formed with water which causes heavy rains and fierce winds and they can cause flooding of streets and homes.

- Cyclone:

A violent tropical storm or wind in which the air moves very fast in a circular direction. They can be formed over tropical waters, bar the Southeast Pacific and the South Atlantic Oceans.

Severity_and_Categories">Severity and CategoriesCyclones are categorised according to their strength. There are 5 categories: Category 1 is the weakest and Category 5 is the strongest.

CategoryWind GustsOcean SwellsDamage1Up to 125km/hr (77mph)

Gales1.2 - 1.6m (3.9' -5.2')Slight damage

Trees and farmland damaged.2126 - 169km/hr (78mph - 105mph)

Destructive1.7 - 2.5m (5.5' - 8.2')Significant Damage

Minor house damage. Severe damage to signs and trees. Heavy damage to crops3170 - 224km/hr (105mph - 139mph)

Very Destructive2.6 - 3.7m (8.5' -12.7')Structural damage

House roofs and most likely power failures4225 - 279km/hr(139mph-173mph)

Very Destructive3.8 - 5.4m (12.4' -17.7')Significant roofing and structural damage

Airborne debris, widespread power failure5Winds above 280km/hr (173mphr)

Very DestructiveMore than 5.5m (18')Almost total destruction and extremely dangerous

Houses flattened, cars over turned

- Typhoon:

A violent wind which has a circular movement, found in the West Pacific Ocean.

Note:

Pressure systems that develop over tropical waters, with tropical-related characteristics, are tropical cyclones, which include tropical storms, hurricanes, typhoons (western Pacific), etc., are called tropical cyclones.

Systems that tend to develop in the multitudes with a jet stream, cold core, etc. are referred to as extra-tropical cyclones. These systems usually produce severe weather in the spring and fall, and severe winter weather in the winter.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Cyclone Yasi
Cyclone Tracy

How do you prepare for a cyclone?

Board up the windows, find a safe place or leave, depending on your situation. Have canned food and bottled water if you stay and hope for the best.

Further information:

Emergency Management Queensland's website offers the following advice for basic action before and during a cyclone:

  • Have a list of emergency phone numbers is an easily accessible position
  • Determine which is the strongest, most secure room in your house
  • Pack an Emergency kit which includes items such as first aid, torch and portable radio with spare batteries, gloves, candles, matches, copies of important documents e.g. birth certificates, essential medications, canned foods
  • Have an evacuation plan ready, including evacuation routes, spare fuel, and listen to Community Service Announcements so you are familiar with what is happening
  • Ensure all garden furniture and loose items outside are secured so they cannot become flying torpedoes
  • Plan ahead of time what will happen with your pets, especially if you cannot take them with you in the event of an evacuation
  • Check your roof condition beforehand, and ensure all loose tiles, iron sheeting, etc is secured and repaired
  • Trim overhanging branches to keep them well away from the house
  • Fill buckets and bath with water in case the drinking water supply is compromised
  • Have sufficient cash on hand for emergencies
  • Tape windows in criss-cross fashion using strong packing tape if you do not have shutters

Once a cyclone hits:

  • Turn off electricity, gas and water, and unplug all appliances
  • Ensure everyone, including pets, are inside
  • Move your family to the strongest room
  • Keep your emergency kit with you at all times
  • Keep listening to the radio for updates
  • If your house begins to break apart, shelter under a really strong table or a mattress
  • During the calm eye, do not venture outdoors. Stay where you are, as the other side of the cyclone is often more intense than before the eye. Wait for the all-clear announced on the radio.

    Click on the link below (Cyclones in the Northern Territory) for full information to guide you through this process.


Before the cyclone season
  • Check with your local council or your building control authority to see if your home has been built to cyclone standards.
  • Check that the walls, roof and eaves of your home are secure.
  • Trim treetops and branches well clear of your home (get council permission).
  • Preferably fit shutters, or at least metal screens, to all glass areas.
  • Clear your property of loose material that could blow about and possibly cause injury or damage during extreme winds.
  • In case of a storm surge/tide warning, or other flooding, know your nearest safe high ground and the safest access route to it.
  • Prepare an emergency kit containing:
    • a portable battery radio, torch and spare batteries;
    • water containers, dried or canned food and a can opener;
    • matches, fuel lamp, portable stove, cooking gear, eating utensils; and
    • a first aid kit and manual, masking tape for windows and waterproof bags.
  • Keep a list of emergency phone numbers on display.
  • Check neighbours, especially if recent arrivals, to make sure they are prepared.
When a cyclone watch is issued
  • Re-check your property for any loose material and tie down (or fill with water) all large, relatively light items such as boats and rubbish bins.
  • Fill vehicles' fuel tanks. Check your emergency kit and fill water containers.
  • Ensure household members know which is the strongest part of the house and what to do in the event of a cyclone warning or an evacuation.
  • Tune to your local radio/TV for further information and warnings.
  • Check that neighbours are aware of the situation and are preparing.
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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
The Difference Between

What is the difference between a typhoon and a hurricane?

Nothing except geography. Tropical storms occur in several of the world's oceans, and except for their names, they are essentially the same type of storm. In the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and the Eastern Pacific Ocean, they are called hurricanes. In the Western Pacific Ocean, they are called typhoons. In the Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, and Australia, these types of storms are called cyclones.

Technically, all hurricanes are cyclones but not all cyclones are hurricanes: if their wind speed is over 74 miles per hour, they're hurricanes, if not, they're just cyclones or tropical storms.

----

Note:

Pressure systems that develop over tropical waters, with tropical-related characteristics are tropical cyclones, which include tropical storms, hurricanes, typhoons (western Pacific), etc., are called tropical cyclones.

Systems that tend to develop in the multitudes with a jet stream, cold core, etc. are referred to as extra-tropical cyclones. These systems usually produce severe weather in the spring and fall, and severe winter weather in the winter.

Nothing except geography. Tropical cyclones occur in several of the world's oceans, and except for their names, they are essentially the same type of storm. In the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and the Eastern Pacific Ocean, they are called hurricanes. In the Western Pacific Ocean, they are called typhoons. In the Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, and Australia, these types of storms are called cyclones.

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Oceans and Seas

Why is ocean water saltier in warm places?

When water evaporates it leaves salt behind causing water in warmer areas that have more evaporation to have saltier water.

The Mediterranean Sea (from observation via thermal images from space) is one of the saltiest seas, also the Red Sea (to a lesser extent). Both the Dead Sea and the Great Salt Lake are so salty that most people find it easy to float. Lake Assal is considered the saltiest body of water outside of Antarctica.

The Northern Pacific is at the other end of the spectrum, containing relatively lower ocean salinity.

Water evaporation at phenomenal rate in warmer places causes accumulation of salt in respective area. Add to the fact that the warmer the water the higher the maximum saturation capacity and you have very salty seas. These are the main two factors of water salinity.

There are areas in the world where fresh water mixes with salt water, thus reducing the salinity. These areas include: 1) The mouths of rivers; 2) The melting ice pack, such as in the Arctic and Antarctic; and 3) Areas around Greenland, where the glaciers 'calve' off, making icebergs. This list is not all inclusive.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Tornadoes

What is the difference between a hurricane and a tornado?

Hurricanes and tornadoes are both damaging windstorms, but they are very different phenomena. One is a large weather system and the other is an isolated weather event. A hurricane is a huge airmass that can be more than 1000 miles across, while a tornado is seldom more than 1 mile across, and often much less.

Hurricanes

A hurricane (also known as a cyclone or typhoon) is a very large,swirling storm with strong winds and heavy rains. It consists of an area of closed, circular fluid motion rotating in the same direction as the Earth. This is usually characterized by inward spiraling winds that rotate counter-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. These cyclonic circulations of wind and clouds can sometimes, but not always, lead to a storm characterized by a low pressure center and numerous thunderstorms that produce strong winds and flooding rain. They can only form over warm water with minimal wind shear, but often make landfall at some point as they move across the ocean. While much of the damage caused by hurricanes is from high winds, equally dangerous is its storm surge, which can flood entire cities, killing large numbers of people.

Hurricanes:

  • Are hundreds of miles wide.
  • Form only over warm ocean water.
  • Last for days and sometimes well over a week.
  • Produce rain and flooding in addition to powerful winds.
  • Are independent, self-sustaining storm systems.
  • Have winds ranging from 74 to about 200 mph

Tornadoes

A tornado is a swirling column of wind that moves across the ground in a relatively narrow path. It consists of a violent, dangerous, rotating column of air which extends from a cloud to the ground. The most intense of all atmospheric phenomena, tornadoes come in many shapes and sizes but are typically in the form of a visible condensation funnel, whose narrow end touches the earth and is often encircled by a cloud of debris and dust. They can demolish entire neighborhoods in a matter of a few seconds to a few minutes.

Tornadoes form from thunderstorms called supercells and reach toward the ground as they develop. Most tornadoes last a few minutes and never more than a few hours. Some last just a few seconds. Most tornado deaths are from flying debris.

Tornadoes:

  • Are rarely over a mile wide
  • Usually form over land
  • Usually last minutes, rarely a few hours
  • Cause damage via wind and debris
  • Are dependent on a large storm to develop and keep going
  • Have winds ranging from 65 to about 300 mph
  • Often have a condensation funnel.

In summary:

  1. Hurricanes form over warm ocean water as tropical depressions, and weaken rapidly over land. Tornadoes normally form over land from mesocyclones.
  2. Hurricanes are hundreds of miles wide while tornadoes are typically a few dozen yards wide, getting up to two-and-a-half miles wide at most.
  3. A hurricane usually lasts a few days while a tornado cannot last more than a few hours, and some last just a few seconds.
  4. Hurricanes can produce large waves and storm surge, tornadoes, waterspouts and flooding rains. A tornado can be accompanied by these but does not directly cause them.
  5. The strongest tornadoes have faster winds than the strongest hurricanes.
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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Natural Disasters

Who to call after a disaster?

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An unexpected disaster that causes significant damage could bewilder any home or business owner in St. Augustine, Florida. The experienced team at ServiceMaster by PWF can assist you with all aspects of the restoration of your properties.

To find out more about flood damage remediation in St. Augustine, water damage restoration services in St. Augustine and mold damage remediation in St. Augustine and to learn more about the services of ServiceMaster by PWF, please feel free to contact us today at (866) 599-0871.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Japan
Asia

How many cyclones have hit south asia last two years?

two

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Hurricane Katrina
Hurricane Andrew

When was Hurricane Katrina?

Hurricane Katrina first formed over the Bahamas on August 23, 2005. On August 29 it hit New Orleans in southeast Louisiana before moving along the Gulf Coast.

It killed: 2 people in Alabama,14 people in Florida,2 people in Georgia,1 person in Kentucky,2 in people in Ohio,238 in Mississippi, and 1,577 people in Louisiana. That is a total of 1,836 dead, and 705 missing.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Emergency Preparedness

What do you do before during and after a cyclone?

Emergency Management Queensland's website offers the following advice for basic action before, during and after a cyclone:

Before

  • Have a list of emergency phone numbers in an easily accessible position
  • Determine which is the strongest, most secure room in your house
  • Pack an Emergency kit which includes items such as first aid, torch and portable radio with spare batteries, gloves, candles, matches, copies of important documents e.g. birth certificates, essential medications, canned foods
  • Have an evacuation plan ready, including evacuation routes, spare fuel, and listen to Community Service Announcements so you are familiar with what is happening
  • Ensure all garden furniture and loose items outside are secured so they cannot become flying torpedoes
  • Plan ahead of time what will happen with your pets, especially if you cannot take them with you in the event of an evacuation
  • Check your roof condition beforehand, and ensure all loose tiles, iron sheeting, etc is secured and repaired
  • Trim overhanging branches to keep them well away from the house
  • Fill buckets and bath with water in case the drinking water supply is compromised
  • Have sufficient cash on hand for emergencies
  • Tape windows in criss-cross fashion using strong packing tape if you do not have shutters

During:

  • Turn off electricity, gas and water, and unplug all appliances
  • Ensure everyone, including pets, are inside
  • Move your family to the strongest room
  • Keep your emergency kit with you at all times
  • Keep listening to the radio for updates
  • If your house begins to break apart, shelter under a really strong table or a mattress
  • During the calm eye, do not venture outdoors. Stay where you are, as the other side of the cyclone is often more intense than before the eye. Wait for the all-clear announced on the radio.

After a cyclone has passed, you are advised to stay indoors or in your shelter, waiting for the signal for "all clear" before venturing out. Naturally, once you are outside, you must be aware of the likelihood of fallen power lines. Only go out if it is necessary, as cleanup crews will be working to ensure the area is safe.

If you wish to download the safety information yourself, click on the link below, and go to "Preparing for Cyclones".

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones

When does the hurricane season start and end?

Every year, the hurricane season officially starts on June 1 and ends on November 30.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Maldives

When does the hurricane season start?

The Atlantic hurricane season starts on June 1 and ends on Nov 30 of every year.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Word and Phrase Origins

Where does the name cyclone come from?

The Greek word for cycle.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones

What are the signals and type of typhoon?

Hurricane and Typhoon Signal and Warning Comparisons

Hong Kong ObservatoryPAGASANHCBoMWA SESSignal One (Stand-by) #1:

A TC within 800 km may affect HK no equivalent no equivalentno equivalentSignal Three (Strong Winds) #3:

41-62km/h Strong Winds expected within 12 hoursPSWS#1 (ONE):

30-60 km/h winds expected in 36 hoursStrong Wind WarningStrong Wind Warning no equivalent no equivalentTropical Storm Watch:

63-117 km/h winds in 36 hoursTropical Cyclone Watch Category 1:

>75 km/h gusts in 24-48 hoursSignal Eight (Gale or Storm Winds) #8:

63-117 km/h Gale or Storm Force winds expected or blowingPSWS#2 (TWO):

60-100 km/h winds expected in 24 hoursTropical Storm Warning:

63-117 km/h winds in <24 hoursTropical Cyclone Warning Category 1:

>75 km/h gusts in <24 hoursSignal Nine (Increasing Gale or Storm Winds) #9:

Increasing Gale or Storm Force winds

(effectively means Gale or Storm Force winds are blowing now and Hurricane Force winds are likely pretty soon) no equivalentHurricane Watch:

>118 km/h winds in 36 hours

Hurricane Watch with Tropical Storm Warning:

63-117 km/h winds in <24 hours and >118 km/h winds in 36 hoursTropical Cyclone Watch Category 2, 3, 4, or 5:

125-280 km/h Gusts in 24-48 hoursSignal Ten (Hurricane):

118 km/h + Hurricane Force winds expected or blowingPSWS#3 (THREE):

100-185 km/h Hurricane Force Winds expected in 18 hoursHurricane Warning Cat 1 or 2:

>118 km/h winds in <24 hours

[119-153 km/h = Cat 1]

[154-177 km/h = Cat 2]Tropical Cyclone Warning Category 2:

125-170 km/h Gusts in <24 hoursno equivalentPSWS#4 (FOUR):

185 km/h + Very Intense Hurricane Force winds expected in 12 hoursHurricane Warning Cat 3, 4, or 5:

[178-209 km/h = Cat 3]

[210-249 km/h = Cat 4]

[>250 km/h = Cat 5]Tropical Cyclone Warning Category 3, 4, or 5:

170-220 km/h Gusts in <24 hours Category 3

[220-280 km/h = cat 4]

[>280 km/h = Cat 5]All Signals were loweredAll Philippine PSWS were loweredAll warnings are cancelledAll warnings are discontinued

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Word Games

Why are no hurricanes named with the letters q xyz?

That's not true. Q - Quincy Y- Yulanda Z- Zebulun or Zeb

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
The Difference Between

What are the differences between a hurricane a typhoon and a cyclone?

It is the location of the storms' occurrences. Hurricanes occur in the Atlantic ocean or east of the International Date Line, typhoons in the Pacific west of the International Date Line, and cyclones in the Indian ocean and south of the equator in the Pacific ocean.

All three are the SAME basic weather event. They are large scale (hundreds of miles across) and form initially over tropical warm sea areas; moist air over the warm sea being their energy source. Their winds are violent (with speeds of at least or 74 miles per hour (119 km/h)), with a circular movement round a central eye (30-60 km [20-40 mi] in diameter, with clear sky and no wind).

In the Northern hemisphere the rotation of the winds is counter-clockwise and south of the equator it is clockwise (the storms do not cross the equator).

Once the storms make landfall, they weaken because their energy source is cut off. When they hit land, the heavy rains and fierce winds cause severe structural damage and can cause flooding of streets and homes accompanied by landslips.

-- Hurricane: a violent tropical storm or wind, especially found in the West Atlantic Ocean.

-- Typhoon: a violent tropical storm or wind, especially found in the West Pacific Ocean.

-- Cyclone: a violent tropical storm or wind, especially found in the Southeast Pacific and Indian Oceans.

Note:

The word "cyclone" is also used to describe any low pressure weather system (the opposite of an anti-cyclone). The term cyclone therefore applies to virtually any large-scale low pressure system with cyclonic rotation, that is counter-clockwise in the northern hemisphere and clockwise in the southern hemisphere.

Therefore, the term cyclone can be used to describe hurricanes, typhoons, tropical storms and tropical depressions (collectively known as tropical cyclones) as well as extra-tropical and polar lows. Although low pressure systems often bring rain and thunderstorms they are not necessarily violent or severe.

Therefore, technically, all hurricanes and Typhoons are "cyclones" but not all "cyclones" are Cyclones, Hurricanes or Typhoons, because the wind speeds are not fast enough.

*Incidentally, despite a popular misconception, cyclones are never called "willy-willies" in Australia. A willy-willy is a harmless whirlwind.

Also Tornadoes are not willy-willies, Cyclones, Hurricanes or Typhoons. They are structures formed by a single cloud and may have even faster wind speeds present over a smaller area.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Tornadoes

What is worst cyclone or tornado?

A cyclone is simply a large-scale area of low atmospheric pressure with closed cyclonic circulation. They may bring thunderstorms but are not necessarily severe. However, hurricanes and typhoons, which are a type of cyclone, are generally worse than tornadoes.

Tornadoes can cause more severe damage on a local scale than cyclones of any type can, but their affects are over a much smaller area.

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Meteorology and Weather
Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones

How do cyclones form?

Simple explanation:

As warm, moist air over the ocean rises up from the ocean surface, there is less air left near the surface, and this causes an area of lower air pressure below. The air around this region has higher air pressure, and so it rushes in to fill the low pressure area. This air also becomes warm and moist and so it rises, too. The cycle keeps going. Warm air rises, the surrounding air swirls in to take its place, and so on. When the warm moist air rises, it cools off, and the water in the air forms clouds. The whole system of clouds and wind spins and grows, because it is being constantly fed by the ocean's heat and water evaporating from the surface.

More detailed explanation:

Cyclones (including typhoons and hurricanes) are caused by warm tropical moisture bearing clouds developing in open oceans or seas. Cyclones can only form over warm waters in the tropical regions of the oceans where the sea temperatures are 26.5 degrees Celsius or higher (around 80 degrees Fahrenheit). They occur in areas of very low pressure when air that is heated by the sun rises rapidly, and becomes saturated with moisture which then condenses into high thunderclouds. As the atmosphere becomes favorable for development (no wind shearing in the higher parts of the atmosphere), normal thunder storms clump together.

When the hot air rises, cooler air rushes in to fill the area left vacant by the hot air. The Coriolis effect of the Earth spinning on its axis causes the air to spiral upwards with considerable force. This in turn causes the winds to rotate faster, causing the tropical low to deepen in intensity into a tropical depression, and eventually a cyclone which is anywhere between hundreds of kilometres to thousands of kilometres wide.

Cyclones are also characterised by strong winds, yet in their centre is a clear, calm region called the 'eye.' When the cyclone continues its course, and the winds return from the other direction, they may seem to be more violent. The winds are not just rotating; there is also the effect of the warmer air continually rising and cold air rushing in. That is why the winds are so strong, and seem to move in all directions.

Winds gusts in a category 5 cyclone can exceed 280 kph, and a fully developed cyclone pumps out about two million tonnes of air per second.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Tornadoes

Which is deadlier a Tornado or a Hurricane?

A hurricane can inflict a higher death toll than a tornado largely because it affects a much bigger area.

Also, there are more ways that hurricanes can kill.

Most tornado deaths result from flying or falling debris, and some other result from people being thrown.

Hurricanes can cause deaths be similar means, but most hurricane deaths result from flooding caused either by the storm surge or heavy rain. The rainfall from hurricanes can also cause deadly landslides.

However, tornadoes are more violent than hurricane and can cause more fatalities per square mile that they affect.

Statistically, however, tornadoes kill more people in the United States than hurricanes.

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Australia Natural Disasters

How did Cyclone Wanda get its name?

At that stage, cyclones were named alphabetically as they occurred. Because of the date it occurred, the meteorologists were up to the letter 'W', and Wanda was simply the name that was chosen.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones

What causes hurricanes?

The term "hurricane" is just another word for a tropical cyclone which forms in the Atlantic Ocean or the eastern Pacific Ocean north of the equator.

Tropical cyclones (including typhoons and hurricanes) are caused by warm tropical moisture bearing clouds developing in open oceans or seas. Tropical cyclones such as hurricanes can only form over warm waters in the tropical regions of the oceans where the sea temperatures are 26.5 degrees Celsius (80 degrees Fahrenheit) or higher. They occur in areas of very low pressure when air that is heated by the sun rises rapidly, and becomes saturated with moisture which then condenses into high thunderclouds. As the atmosphere becomes favorable for development (no wind shearing in the higher parts of the atmosphere), normal thunderstorms clump together.

When the hot air rises, more warm air rushes in to fill the area left vacant by the hot air. The Coriolis effect of the Earth spinning on its axis causes the air to spiral inwards with considerable force. This in turn causes the winds to rotate faster, causing the tropical low to deepen in intensity into a tropical depression, and eventually a cyclone/ hurricane which is anywhere between hundreds of kilometres to thousands of kilometres wide.

Strong tropical cyclones such as hurricanes are also characterized by strong winds, yet in their center is a clear, calm region called the 'eye'. When the storm continues its course, and the winds return from the other direction, they may seem to be more violent. The winds are not just rotating; there is also the effect of the warmer air continually rising. Not only are the winds moving at high speed horizontally, but they are simultaneously moving at relatively high speeds vertically. That is why the winds are so strong, and seem to move in all directions.

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
New Orleans
Hurricane Katrina

What percentage of New Orleans was underwater during Katrina?

70 % , mostly the area built after 1900

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones
Hurricane Katrina

What land did Hurricane Katrina destroy?

Bahamas, south Florida, Cuba, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida panhandle

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Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones

Where do hurricanes go after they form?

They track across the ocean like all other weather systems. They gain energy in a complex interplay with the water, sun and rotation of the earth. When they cross to be over a landmass this interaction is switched off and they gradually die out becoming first just large storms, finally down to depressions.

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