Identity Theft Issues

The criminal act of assuming another person's identity for the purpose of initiating financial transactions

1,496 Questions
DIY Projects
Identity Theft Issues

How do you wash off anti-theft dye?

Sorry, many criminals would love to know this but the truth is it only fades with time.

There are several products on the market now. Some leave trace amounts only visible under U/V light and others will leave magnetic trace that will set off alarms in stores.

Purple and red dyes are semi permanent and will remain for weeks. No amount of washing will remove it.

348349350
Identity Theft Issues
Computer and Internet Fraud
Banks and Financial Institutions

What are some Royal Bank of Scotland scams?

The Royal Bank of Scotland is very much aware of a number of scams that intend to take money from unsuspecting people. Their website devotes several pages to the subject. Please see discussion comments for those and other links regarding banking scams.

One of the most common scams is called "transfer fee scam" or "advance fee scam". The "mark" or selected victim is sent a barrage of emails encouraging friendship, then enlisting their help. There is usually some very sad tale of woe, like

  • Their family died (sometimes killed by rebels)
  • They escaped harm because they were elsewhere, like away at school
  • The poor soul is now in a refugee camp or in somewhat dire straits
  • The dead parents have large sums of money in a bank that is inaccessible to them.
  • They need someone to act as an agent to access their money. This is where the mark becomes useful.
  • The scammer provides bank employee names and contact information.
  • The 'bank' requests documents, bank account and personal ID information from the mark, supposedly to validate their ID and the account to which the money is to be transferred.
  • The 'bank' may also required a transaction fee.

The end result is that there is no bank account awaiting transfer, the transaction fee disappears into the pockets of the scammers along with the contents of the victim's bank account.

If you receive any messages even vaguely similar to the above scenario

  • Do not respond to the emails
  • Do not contact, phone or email the contacts provided
  • Do not send your account information, any personal ID documents, or any money to the 'bank' involved.
  • Do not depend upon social media sites to verify the contact information. Scammers have the same access that you do and will very happily say that everything is valid.
  • Contact your own bank about the scam.
  • Consider reporting the abuse to the Internet Service Provider that the scammers use.

No, it is a scam they are trying to steal your money.

No. Any information found using the name of Nelson Smith at the Royal Bank of Scotland indicates that the request is a Scam and there is no such person at the Royal Bank of Scotland, nor is there a position called "Transfer Officer".
There is no job titled "Transfer Officer" at the Royal Bank of Scotland.
Mr. Oliver Stocken is a fictional Bank Employee used in 419 E-Mail Scams.

Previous work includes roles on UPN's long-running situational comedy "Moesha" starring Brandy Norwood.

167168169
Banking
Identity Theft Issues

How can you cash a third party money order?

You cannot. A Money Order can be cashed only by the person to whom it is written out to. It is illegal to cash someone else's money order. If you try to do this, you may be charged with fraud and can be jailed for involving.

If the someone else under consideration has given you a legal Power of Attorney, then you can cash it because you will be acting on his behalf and this is legal.

293294295
Credit and Debit Cards
Identity Theft Issues

Does anybody actually sign the back of their credit cards?

Yes, and it's a pretty good idea. Signing your card means merchants have something to check the signature on the receipt against, which is supposed to be a key security step.

The reasoning against signing a credit card is usually that if your card gets stolen, the thief has an example to follow if they want to forge your signature. Some people will write "See ID" in the signature slot instead, hoping that message will prompt store clerks to ask to see the scoundrel's ID before ringing up the sale, thus blocking any fraudulent purchases.

This, however, is a flawed scheme at best. For one, lots of stores don’t check the back of the card, especially with the rise of self checkout machines. So that "See ID" message is probably not going to foil any scams. Additionally, thieves rarely take the time to practice their penmanship, so if you signed the back of your card and contest a fraudulent charge, their phony signature is pretty easy to spot.

And besides, you're probably in violation of the card’s terms of service if it’s not signed. Visa, for example, advises merchants who actually check that "an unsigned card is considered invalid and should not be accepted."

So yeah, lots of people sign their credit cards, and it’s generally a good practice.

878889
Identity Theft Issues

How many people get robbed a day?

about 20,000 if you count all of the business's etc.

167168169
Personal Finance
Loans
Co-signing
Bankruptcy Law
Identity Theft Issues
Money Management

What are the rights or obligations of a co-signer for a loan that has been included in a bankruptcy and who does not have the money to pay the large debt himself?

The obligation is that the loan is now the liability of the co-signer who did NOT file bankruptcy.

Your rights are the same as any debtor. You can pay the loan, or default. Declaring bankruptcy yourself is an option also. For those reading along...this is why lenders want a co signer before lending to people they don't think can/will pay off their promises. They've seen it before.

So when/if the primary can't/doesn't pay, someone else will.

This lender, unlike others who will get nothing by the primary declaring bankruptcy, will more than likely get his debt paid by - or the assets of the cosigner to do so.

Funny, the deadbeat will now get away without paying the promises to this lender, other lenders and wanna bet, never repay the cosigner, ever, too!

122123124
Banking
Identity Theft Issues
Money Management

What is an AC bank scam?

When you steal other people's money with the knowledge of their internet banking details

119120121
Repossession
Credit and Debit Cards
Identity Theft Issues

How long would a person go to jail for debit card theft?

my cousin went for 7 years

117118119
Co-signing
Phishing
Identity Theft Issues

What if your cosigning is a case of identity theft?

The identity theft has to be resolved before the co-signing can be resolved. File charges,ect get that out of the way, then work on the co-signing mess.

117118119
Credit and Debit Cards
Identity Theft Issues
Communication
Letters Notes and Memos

Sample letter to request for ID card?

id card make leter

575859
Foreclosure
Identity Theft Issues

How is opening bid price determined in trustee sale?

In most cases, the opening bid is the amount required to pay the loan in full.

878889
Identity Theft Issues

How much time would you serve for identity theft or fraud?

The increase in crimes of identity theft lead to the drafting of the Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act. In 1998, The Federal Trade Commission appeared before the United States Senate. The FTC discussed crimes which exploit consumer credit to commit loan fraud, mortgage fraud, lines-of-credit fraud, credit card fraud, commodities and services frauds. The Identity Theft and Assumption Deterrence Act (2003) [ITADA] amended U.S. Code Title 18, § 1028 ("Fraud related to activity in connection with identification documents, authentication features, and information"). The statute now makes the possession of any "means of identification" to "knowingly transfer, possess, or use without lawful authority" a federal crime, alongside unlawful possession of identification documents. However, for federal jurisdiction to prosecute, the crime must include an "identification document" that either: (a) is purportedly issued by the United States, (b) is used or intended to defraud the United States, (c) is sent through the mail, or (d) is used in a manner that affects interstate or foreign commerce. See 18 U.S.C. § 1028(c). Punishment can be up to 5, 15, 20, or 30 years in federal prison, plus fines, depending on the underlying crime per 18 U.S.C. § 1028(b). In addition, punishments for the unlawful use of a "means of identification" were strengthened in § 1028A ("Aggravated Identity Theft"), allowing for a consecutive sentence under specific enumerated felony violations as defined in § 1028A(c)(1) through .

AnswerIt depends on what is involved. It can be a state and/or Federal crime. For example using a driver's license in the state I Reside is a Class "D" felony (higher depending on the circumstances). The use of someone else's or a false SS# is a Federal crime and can carry serious penalties. Recently a man was sentenced to seven years in a Federal penitentiary for using his brother's ID, SS# to get a car loan.

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Answer:

Falsely posing as another person is a criminal act and carries serious penalties. If you have been accused of or charged with an identity theft crime, your case may be filed as either a misdemeanor or a felony.

A misdemeanor charge is punishable by up to one year in jail. A felony is punishable by 16 months or more of state prison time. The charge and sentence will depend on the following:

  • Seriousness or degree of the victim's harm
  • Amount of monetary damage
  • The sophistication of the crime
  • Defendant's past criminal record
  • Internet theft: the Internet crosses state lines, so the theft can also be charged as a federal crime

The scariest part of all of this is sometimes the person who is the victim is actually the one who ends up in jail. Yes it is true. Many times the thieves never even get caught. Authorities come after the victim when an identity theft thief commits fraud in someone else's name. Go to

http://www.legalinsuranceagents.com/blog-criminal-identity-theft to read more.

404142
Credit and Debit Cards
Identity Theft Issues
Computer and Internet Fraud

How can you prevent identity theft?

For starters buy a shredder, never throw out anything that would have important information. Since many folks go dumpster diving and not all of them are looking for cans. Then you contact your local credit reporting agencies by mail and ask what they do and you can, to protect you from fraud. Also your local Police Depatment may have more information. Since they deal with such matters daily. They maybe willing (just as they do in the neighborhood watch and street smart,) to bring you and your neighbors together and instruct you on how to avoid being a victim.

In today's society with computers and the ability to obtain your information from a variety of sources it is almost impossible to prevent identity theft. There are a lot of things that you can do to minimize your chances and the resulting damage.

First is to obtain you credit report every year. New Federal legislation that is going into effect shortly makes it mandatory that the credit agencies provide you one for free.

Equifax P.O. Box 740241 Atlanta, GA 30374 1-800-685-1111

Experian P.O. Box 2002 Allen, TX 75013 1-800-787-6864

TransUnion P.O. Box 2000 Chester, PA 19022-2000 1-877-322-8228

Another good idea is to opt out of all the credit card offers. Keep a low level credit card and pay it off each month, especially for internet uses. The same is a good idea for bank accounts. Have one account at a separate bank and only keep a minimal balance. Keep your savings account at another bank because the bank can and will transfer money from one account to another without your knowledge.

Especially important is to not give out any personal information over the phone. Scammers are particullary adept at this tactic and will appear perfectly legitimate.

A good article on preventing identity theft is They Say I'm Not Me

You can protect yourself from identity theft by making good decisions:

1) Shred your mail (credit card offers, bill statements, checking account statements, etc.).

2) Don't give out your Social Security number to anyone who calls you--they may say they're from your bank or credit-card company, but they're probably lying.

3) Don't leave your Social Security card in your wallet.

4) Check your credit report three times a year (there are three different credit bureaus: go to annualcreditreport.com and every four months get a report from a different bureau). Check to see if there are any accounts you don't recognize. Report them.

5) Do your bills electronically. When bills, credit-card offers, etc. come in the mail or you leave payments in your mailbox, especially if it's not a locked box, anyone can take this mail and steal your identity and your money.

6) Check your accounts regularly online (credit cards, bank statements) and report any suspicious activity.

7) Don't use wireless networks (cell phone or laptop) to do financial stuff--those networks can be hacked. Using landlines (DSL, phone) are much much safer.

8) Don't respond to emails from your bank, credit card company, etc. that ask to "confirm your account" or some other fishy story by giving your Social Security number, PIN number, etc. Your bank will NEVER ask for that information via an email sent to you. These emails come from scam artists who figure that, if they send 1 million emails pretending to be from a particular bank, some of the recipients will actually be customers of that bank and may fall for the scam. If you get a message asking for confidential information, call your bank, credit-card company, etc. (don't use the number in the email--look it up) and double-check that it's really from the bank, etc.

868788
Identity Theft Issues
Web Hosting
Commercial Bank and Checking Accounts

What does wfn pbp wfn web pmt stand for?

It's a web payment that you made to a store credit card (ex. Best Buy, Express, Victoria's Secret, Macy's, etc...)

It stands for World Financial Network (National Bank) Pay By Phone; World Financial Newtork Web Payment

394041
Identity Theft Issues

What do you call a person who steals books?

Vdhuddc

596061
Pontiac Montana
Personal Finance
Demographics
Identity Theft Issues

What is the average cost to repair the damage in both time and money for a victim of identity theft?

Asics footwear is a fairly new product line that hasn't expanded yet. Asics can be bought from the companies main portal site Asic.com, and deals and sales on discontinued products are put up frequently enough to check up on it once in a while

454647
Identity Theft Issues
Banking
Retirement Planning

Is there a Sygma bank in London?

Sygma Bank UK is the trading name in the UK of Sygma Banque SA incorporated in France with head office at 66 Rues des Archives,75003 Paris. Sygma Bank UK is on the Financial Services Authority register in the UK by virtue of its parent's authorisation by the Banque de France. Pricipal place of business in the UK is Chadwick House, Blenheim Court, Solihull B91 2AA Tel 0121 712 9000 Address for complaints is Sygma Banque, Equipoint, Coventry Road, Yardley, Birmingham B25 8FE, 0870 241 3427

606162
Banking
Identity Theft Issues

What is the purpose of a tellers bank stamp?

A teller's stamp is used to identify that teller by banking center and individual identification number. What it is used on depends on the bank, but typically a teller will stamp straps of cash that they have verified, documents they have created in relation to a transaction, etc.

555657
Banking
Estates
Identity Theft Issues

How can you obtain bank records as executor of estate?

An executor must be appointed by the probate court. The court will issue "Letters Testamentary" and those letters give the executor the legal authority to access the decedent's assets. You will need to provide the bank with a copy of your Letters Testamentary in order to collect the balances and close the accounts.

575859
Business & Finance
Demographics
Identity Theft Issues

What do you do if your a victim of identity theft?

Contact the FBI == == What are the steps I should take if I'm a victim of identity theft? If you are a victim of identity theft, take the following four steps as soon as possible, and keep a record with the details of your conversations and copies of all correspondence. 1. Place a fraud alert on your credit reports, and review your credit reports. Fraud alerts can help prevent an identity thief from opening any more accounts in your name. Contact the toll-free fraud number of any of the three consumer reporting companies below to place a fraud alert on your credit report. You only need to contact one of the three companies to place an alert. The company you call is required to contact the other two, which will place an alert on their versions of your report, too. If you do not receive a confirmation from a company, you should contact that company directly to place a fraud alert. TransUnion:1-800-680-7289; www.transunion.com; Fraud Victim Assistance Division, P.O. Box 6790, Fullerton, CA 92834-6790 Equifax:1-800-525-6285; www.equifax.com; P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374-0241 Experian: 1-888-EXPERIAN (397-3742); www.experian.com; P.O. Box 9532, Allen, TX 75013 Once you place the fraud alert in your file, you're entitled to order one free copy of your credit report from each of the three consumer reporting companies, and, if you ask, only the last four digits of your Social Security number will appear on your credit reports. Once you get your credit reports, review them carefully. Look for inquiries from companies you haven't contacted, accounts you didn't open, and debts on your accounts that you can't explain. Check that information, like your Social Security number, address(es), name or initials, and employers are correct. If you find fraudulent or inaccurate information, get it removed. See Correcting Fraudulent Information in Credit Reports to learn how. When you correct your credit report, use an Identity Theft Report with a cover letter explaining your request, to get the fastest and most complete results. Continue to check your credit reports periodically, especially for the first year after you discover the identity theft, to make sure no new fraudulent activity has occurred. 2. Close the accounts that you know, or believe, have been tampered with or opened fraudulently. Call and speak with someone in the security or fraud department of each company. Follow up in writing, and include copies (NOT originals) of supporting documents. It's important to notify credit card companies and banks in writing. Send your letters by certified mail, return receipt requested, so you can document what the company received and when. Keep a file of your correspondence and enclosures. When you open new accounts, use new Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) and passwords. Avoid using easily available information like your mother's maiden name, your birth date, the last four digits of your Social Security number or your phone number, or a series of consecutive numbers. If the identity thief has made charges or debits on your accounts, or has fraudulently opened accounts, ask the company for the forms to dispute those transactions: * For charges and debits on existing accounts, ask the representative to send you the company's fraud dispute forms. If the company doesn't have special forms, use the sample letter to dispute the fraudulent charges or debits. In either case, write to the company at the address given for "billing inquiries," NOT the address for sending your payments. * For new unauthorized accounts, you can either file a dispute directly with the company or file a report with the police and provide a copy, called an "Identity Theft Report," to the company. * ** If you want to file a dispute directly with the company, and do not want to file a report with the police, ask if the company accepts the FTC's ID Theft Affidavit (PDF, 56 KB). If it does not, ask the representative to send you the company's fraud dispute forms. ** However, filing a report with the police and then providing the company with an Identity Theft Report will give you greater protection. For example, if the company has already reported these unauthorized accounts or debts on your credit report, an Identity Theft Report will require them to stop reporting that fraudulent information. Use the cover letter to explain to the company the rights you have by using the Identity Theft Report. More information about getting and using an Identity Theft Report can be found here. Once you have resolved your identity theft dispute with the company, ask for a letter stating that the company has closed the disputed accounts and has discharged the fraudulent debts. This letter is your best proof if errors relating to this account reappear on your credit report or you are contacted again about the fraudulent debt. 3. File a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. You can file a complaint with the FTC using the online complaint form; or call the FTC's Identity Theft Hotline, toll-free: 1-877-ID-THEFT (438-4338); TTY: 1-866-653-4261; or write Identity Theft Clearinghouse, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20580. Be sure to call the Hotline to update your complaint if you have any additional information or problems. By sharing your identity theft complaint with the FTC, you will provide important information that can help law enforcement officials across the nation track down identity thieves and stop them. The FTC can refer victims' complaints to other government agencies and companies for further action, as well as investigate companies for violations of laws the agency enforces. Additionally, you can provide a printed copy of your online Complaint form to the police to incorporate into their police report. The printed FTC ID Theft Complaint, in conjunction with the police report, can constitute an Identity Theft Report and entitle you to certain protections. This Identity Theft Report can be used to (1) permanently block fraudulent information from appearing on your credit report; (2) ensure that debts do not reappear on your credit report; (3) prevent a company from continuing to collect debts that result from identity theft; and (4) place an extended fraud alert on your credit report. 4. File a report with your local police or the police in the community where the identity theft took place. Call your local police department and tell them that you want to file a report about your identity theft. Ask them if you can file the report in person. If you cannot, ask if you can file a report over the Internet or telephone. See below for information about Automated Reports.

If the police are reluctant to take your report, ask to file a "Miscellaneous Incident" report, or try another jurisdiction, like your state police. You also can check with your state Attorney General's office to find out if state law requires the police to take reports for identity theft. Check the Blue Pages of your telephone directory for the phone number or check www.naag.org for a list of state Attorneys General. When you go to your local police department to file your report, bring a printed copy of your FTC ID Theft Complaint form, your cover letter, and your supporting documentation. The cover letter explains why a police report and an ID Theft Complaint are so important to victims. Ask the officer to attach or incorporate the ID Theft Complaint into their police report. Tell them that you need a copy of the Identity Theft Report (the police report with your ID Theft Complaint attached or incorporated)to dispute the fraudulent accounts and debts created by the identity thief. (In some jurisdictions the officer will not be able to give you a copy of the official police report, but should be able to sign your Complaint and write the police report number in the "Law Enforcement Report" section.) What is a fraud alert?

There are two types of fraud alerts: an initial alert, and an extended alert. * An initial fraud alert stays on your credit report for at least 90 days. You may ask that an initial fraud alert be placed on your credit report if you suspect you have been, or are about to be, a victim of identity theft. An initial alert is appropriate if your wallet has been stolen or if you've been taken in by a "phishing" scam. With an initial fraud alert, potential creditors must use what the law refers to as "reasonable policies and procedures" to verify your identity before issuing credit in your name. However, the steps potential creditors take to verify your identity may not always alert them that the applicant is not you. When you place an initial fraud alert on your credit report, you're entitled to order one free credit report from each of the three nationwide consumer reporting companies, and, if you ask, only the last four digits of your Social Security number will appear on your credit reports. * An extended fraud alert stays on your credit report for seven years. You can have an extended alert placed on your credit report if you've been a victim of identity theft and you provide the consumer reporting company with an Identity Theft Report. An automated Identity Theft Report, such as the printed ID Theft Complaint available from this Web site, should be sufficient to obtain an extended fraud alert. With an extended fraud alert, potential creditors must actually contact you, or meet with you in person, before they issue you credit. When you place an extended alert on your credit report, you're entitled to two free credit reports within twelve months from each of the three nationwide consumer reporting companies. In addition, the consumer reporting companies will remove your name from marketing lists for pre-screened credit offers for five years unless you ask them to put your name back on the list before then. To place either of these alerts on your credit report, or to have them removed, you will be required to provide appropriate proof of your identity: that may include your Social Security number, name, address and other personal information requested by the consumer reporting company. As mentioned, depending on the type of fraud alert you place, potential creditors must either contact you or take reasonable steps to verify your identity. This may cause some delays if you're trying to obtain credit. To compensate for possible delays, you may wish to include a cell phone number, where you can be reached easily, in your alert. Remember to keep all contact information in your alert current. What does a fraud alert not do? While a fraud alert can help keep an identity thief from opening new accounts in your name, it's not a solution to all types of identity theft. It will not protect you from an identity thief using your existing credit cards or other accounts. It also will not protect you from an identity thief opening new accounts in your name that do not require a credit check - such as a telephone, wireless, or bank account. And, if there's identity theft already going on when you place the fraud alert, the fraud alert alone won't stop it. A fraud alert, however, can be extremely useful in stopping identity theft that involves opening a new line of credit. What is a credit freeze? Many states have laws that let consumers "freeze" their credit - in other words, letting a consumer restrict access to his or her credit report. If you place a credit freeze, potential creditors and other third parties will not be able to get access to your credit report unless you temporarily lift the freeze. This means that it's unlikely that an identity thief would be able to open a new account in your name. Placing a credit freeze does not affect your credit score - nor does it keep you from getting your free annual credit report, or from buying your credit report or score. Credit freeze laws vary from state to state. In some states, anyone can freeze their credit file, while in other states, only identity theft victims can. The cost of placing, temporarily lifting, and removing a credit freeze also varies. Many states make credit freezes free for identity theft victims, while other consumers pay a fee - typically $10. It's also important to know that these costs are for each of the credit reporting agencies. If you want to freeze your credit, it would mean placing the freeze with each of three credit reporting agencies, and paying the fee to each one. You can find more information about credit freeze laws specific to your state by clicking here, including information on how to place one. Who can access my credit report if I place a credit freeze? If you place a credit freeze, you will continue to have access to your free annual credit report. You'll also be able to buy your credit report and credit score even after placing a credit freeze. Companies that you do business with will still have access to your credit report - for example, your mortgage, credit card, or cell phone company - as would collection agencies that are working for one of those companies. Companies will also still be able to offer you prescreened credit. Those are the credit offers you receive in the mail that you have not applied for. Additionally, in some states, potential employers, insurance companies, landlords, and other non-creditors can still get access to your credit report with a credit freeze in place. Can I temporarily lift my credit freeze if I need to let someone check my credit report? If you want to apply for a loan or credit card, or otherwise need to give someone access to your credit report and that person is not covered by an exception to the credit freeze law, you would need to temporarily lift the credit freeze. You would do that by using a PIN that each credit reporting agency would send once you placed the credit freeze. In most states, you'd have to pay a fee to lift the credit freeze. Most states currently give the credit reporting agencies three days to lift the credit freeze. This might keep you from getting "instant" credit, which may be something to weigh when considering a credit freeze. What does a credit freeze not do? While a credit freeze can help keep an identity thief from opening most new accounts in your name, it's not a solution to all types of identity theft. It will not protect you, for example, from an identity thief who uses your existing credit cards or other accounts. There are also new accounts, such as telephone, wireless, and bank accounts, which an ID thief could open without a credit check. In addition, some creditors might open an account without first getting your credit report. And, if there's identity theft already going on when you place the credit freeze, the freeze itself won't be able to stop it. While a credit freeze may not protect you in these kinds of cases, it can protect you from the vast majority of identity theft that involves opening a new line of credit. What's the difference between a credit freeze and a fraud alert? A fraud alert is another tool for people who've had their ID stolen - or who suspect it may have been stolen. With a fraud alert in place, businesses may still check your credit report. Depending on whether you place an initial 90-day fraud alert or an extended fraud alert, potential creditors must either contact you or use what the law refers to as "reasonable policies and procedures" to verify your identity before issuing credit in your name. However, the steps potential creditors take to verify your identity may not always alert them that the applicant is not you. A credit freeze, on the other hand, will prevent potential creditors and other third parties from accessing your credit report at all, unless you lift the freeze or already have a relationship with the company. Some consumers use credit freezes because they feel they give more protection. As with credit freezes, fraud alerts are mainly effective against new credit accounts being opened in your name, but will likely not stop thieves from using your existing accounts, or opening new accounts such as new telephone or wireless accounts, where credit is often not checked. Also, only people who've had their ID stolen - or who suspect it may have been stolen, may place fraud alerts. In some states, anyone can place a credit freeze. What is an Identity Theft Report? An Identity Theft Report is a police report with more than the usual amount of detail. The Identity Theft Report includes enough detail about the crime for the credit reporting companies and the businesses involved to verify that you are a victim-and to know which accounts and inaccurate information came from identity theft. Normal police reports often don't have many details about the accounts that were opened or misused by identity thieves. The printed copy of your ID Theft Complaint Form can provide additional details for the police report. The police are not legally required to use the FTC's ID Theft Complaint Form as part of their report. Your police department may have another way to incorporate the details of your crime. In these cases, the police report by itself may serve as an Identity Theft Report.

When you file your Identity Theft Report, the credit reporting companies will permanently block fraudulent information from appearing on your credit report. Filing an Identity Theft Report with the credit reporting companies or with the companies where the thief used your information should ensure that these debts do not reappear on your credit report. An Identity Theft Report can prevent a company from continuing to try to collect debts that result from identity theft, or sell those debts to others for collection. It also allows you to place an extended fraud alert on your credit report. The credit reporting companies may decline your Identity Theft Report if it does not contain enough detail for them to verify that you are a victim of identity theft. In that case, the credit reporting companies have certain timeframes for responding to your Identity Theft Report with requests for additional information. Creating and using an Identity Theft Report may require two steps: Step One begins with filing your report with a local, state, or federal law enforcement agency. These agencies may include your local police department, your State Attorney General, the FBI, the U.S. Secret Service, the FTC, or the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. Some state laws require local police departments to take reports, but there is no law requiring federal agencies to take a report. In your report, you should give as much information as you can about the crime, including anything you know about the dates of the identity theft, the fraudulent accounts opened and the alleged identity thief. It may help you give the necessary level of detail if you file an online complaint with the FTC, and then ask your local police department to incorporate a copy of the printed ID Theft Complaint into its police report. Step Two begins when you send the businesses involved and the credit reporting companies a copy of your Identity Theft Report, which you should do by certified mail, return receipt requested. The companies may ask you to give them more information or documentation to help them verify your identity theft. They have to make their request within 15 days of receiving your Identity Theft Report. The credit reporting company or business then has 15 more days to work with you to make sure your Identity Theft Report contains everything they need. They are also entitled to five days to review any information you give them. For example, if you give them information 11 days after they request it, they have until day 16 to make a final decision. How do I get an Identity Theft Report?

The officer taking your police report can attach or incorporate your ID Theft Complaint into their police report to add more detail. Ask the officer to give you a copy of the official police report that incorporates or attaches your ID Theft Complaint. In some places the officer will not be able to give you a copy of the official police report, but should be able to sign a copy of your ID Theft Complaint and write the police report number in the "Law Enforcement Report" section. Be sure to keep a copy of the police report number

The police are not legally required to use the FTC's ID Theft Complaint Form as part of their report. Your police department may have another way to include all the details of your identity theft information in their police report. In these cases, the police report by itself may serve as an Identity Theft Report. Because the detailed Identity Theft Report is required for you to get many important protections, you may wish to use the Law Enforcement Cover Letter to explain to the police department how important it is for you to get a police report - as well as the legal protections that a detailed Identity Theft Report gives you. How do I submit my Identity Theft Report to the credit reporting companies, or to businesses where the thief used my information?

When you send a copy of your Identity Theft Report to the fraud departments of the three major credit reporting companies, include a copy of the credit reporting company cover letter, along with copies of your supporting documentation. Send your information by certified mail with return receipt requested. The mailing addresses for sending Identity Theft Reports to the three major credit reporting companies are on the cover letter.

When writing to the fraud departments of each of the companies where the identity thief has committed fraud using your personal information, include copies of the Identity Theft Report, your supporting documentation, and the appropriate cover letter: for fraud on your existing accounts, or for fraud on new accounts. Always send this information by certified mail, with a return receipt requested. The credit reporting companies have certain timeframes for responding to your Identity Theft Report with requests for additional information. What do I do if the police only take reports about identity theft over the Internet or telephone? The FTC ID Theft Complaint has a special section for police reports that are not filed face-to-face, to help you use it to supplement an automated police report. If you file a police report online or over the phone, complete the "Automated Report Information" block of the ID Theft Complaint. Attach a copy of any filing confirmation received from the police.

If you have a choice, however, you should file your police report in person and not use an automated report. It is more difficult for the consumer reporting company and information provider to verify the information in an automated report, and they will likely require additional information and/or documentation. What do I do if the local police won't take a report? There are efforts at the federal, state and local level to ensure that local law enforcement agencies understand identity theft, its impact on victims, and the importance of taking a police report. However, we still hear that some departments are not taking reports. The following tips may help you to get a report if you're having difficulties: * Provide the officer with a copy of the Law Enforcement Cover Letter that explains why the police report and the Identity Theft Report are so important to both victims and industry. * Furnish as much documentation as you can to prove your case. Debt collection letters, credit reports, a copy of your printed ID Theft Complaint, and other evidence of fraudulent activity can help demonstrate the legitimacy of your case. Provide the police a copy of "Remedying the Effects of Identity Theft," which shows that police reports are necessary to secure your rights. * Be persistent if local authorities tell you that they can't take a report. Stress the importance of a police report; many creditors require one to resolve your dispute. Remind them that consumer reporting companies will automatically block the fraudulent accounts and bad debts from appearing on your credit report, but only if you can give them a copy of the police report. In addition, a police report may be needed to obtain the fraudulent application and other records the company has. * If you're told that identity theft is not a crime under your state law, ask to file a Miscellaneous Incident Report instead. * If you can't get the local police to take a report, try your county police. If that doesn't work, try your state police. Some states require the police to take reports for identity theft. Check with the office of your State Attorney General, which can be found at www.naag.org, to find out if your state has this law. How do I prove that I'm an identity theft victim? Applications or other transaction records related to the theft of your identity may help you prove that you are a victim. For example, you may be able to show that the signature on an application is not yours. These documents also may contain information about the identity thief that is valuable to law enforcement. By law, companies must give you a copy of the application or other business transaction records relating to your identity theft if you submit your request in writing, accompanied by a police report. Read more about getting information from businesses, and use this model letter to request this information. Should I apply for a new Social Security number? Under certain circumstances, the Social Security Administration may issue you a new Social Security number - at your request - if, after trying to resolve the problems brought on by identity theft, you continue to experience problems. Consider this option carefully. A new Social Security number may not resolve your identity theft problems, and may actually create new problems. For example, a new Social Security number does not necessarily ensure a new credit record because credit bureaus may combine the credit records from your old Social Security number with those from your new Social Security number. Even when the old credit information is not associated with your new Social Security number, the absence of any credit history under your new Social Security number may make it more difficult for you to get credit. And finally, there's no guarantee that a new Social Security number wouldn't also be misused by an identity thief. * contact all three credit agencys, let them know you are a victim. They will put on your credit report to "contact me at ______ before extending credit." all so dispute any accounts that are not yours Answer: Not only in personal levels, Identity theft is the need of the hour. Identity Access Management is the current catch word in many organizations. The reason for the sudden upsurge is the rise in security threats and the need to comply with regulatory bodies globally. It is imperative to install a good security management program that encompasses every person who is in anyway related to the organization.

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Law & Legal Issues
Credit Reports
Identity Theft Issues
Credit

Why do you have to pay for a credit report?

You are entitled to a free credit report once every twelve months. To order yours, go here: https://www.annualcreditreport.com/cra/index.jsp

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Personal Finance
Credit and Debit Cards
Job Search
Identity Theft Issues

How does identity theft affect teens?

Identity Theft is a serious issue! If a teenager has experienced this or an adult your first step is to file a police report with your local police station. Or go online, and file a report. Once this is taken care of, call Equifax and put a fraud alert on your credit report (a simple process) immediately. Then prepare an explanation letter (formal letter), and mail this to all three bureaus with your most recent copy of your credit report, police report, copy of drivers license, and social security card. This should prepare you the teen of any future unfortunate events. If they are going through fraud with different creditors you will need to contact a credit repair organization or do your research and try to fix this immediately.

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Estates
Endangered, Vulnerable, and Threatened Species
Identity Theft Issues

Why was James Bay Project created?

it was created because the project was best for Quebec.

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Celebrities
Criminal Law
Identity Theft Issues

What private investigator to the stars was indicted on 110 federal counts alleging crimes of racketeering and conspiracy wire tapping witness tampering identity theft and destruction of evidenc?

Anthony Pellicano. Need more information? A link is provided to Wikipedia, where knowledge is free.

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Identity Theft Issues

A problem in Brazil for identity theft?

No, identify theft in Brazil is very rare if not at all. They have new identity cards al the time. Brazil's technology is one of the most advanced in the world and very up to date! All identity cards are almost impossible to copy.

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