Immigration

Moving from one country to another involves meeting certain requirements and obtaining the proper permissions. This category is for questions related to these requirements and processes.

Asked in Immigration, Mexico

Why do Mexicans illegally cross the US-Mexican border?

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Like most modern Americans (unless you are a Native American), they leave their home country for economic, religious or political reasons. In the case of Mexicans (and nowadays, more and more Central Americans), they are attracted to the "American dream": while, on average, a U.S. worker earns a wage of US$58,714, the average Mexican worker earns only US$14,867. In addition, many of them flee their home countries due to increasing drug violence in Mexico and the Northern Triangle (Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras). For example, while the United States has a murder rate of 3.9 homicides per 100,000 people, the Mexican state of Guerrero has a murder rate of 67; El Salvador has a rate of 64, and Honduras has a rate of 84 (highest in the world). Most illegal immigrants are people with little or no education; most of them are former farm laborers who do not earn enough to support their families and are forced to look for alternatives. As the process of immigration and naturalization into the U.S. would disqualify them, many opted to enter the country illegally. Nowadays, due to stricter border controls and a general improvement of the Mexican economy, the immigration process has begun to reverse: the net migration rate between 2009 and 2014 is 140,000 people leaving the country for Mexico; most illegal immigrants that enter U.S. soil today are Central Americans, and even an increasing number of them apply for asylum in Mexico. Mexico Push Factors: Few opportunities Poor medical care Loss of wealth Poor housing Discrimination Pull Factors of the United States: Job opportunities Better living conditions Education Better medical care Security Family links
Asked in History, Politics & Society, History of the United States, Immigration

How did the Nativists feel about immigrants?

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In scholarly studies "nativism" is a standard technical term. However, in public political discourse "nativist" is a term of opprobrium usually used by the opposition, and rarely by nativists themselves (they call themselves "patriots."). Anti-immigration is a more neutral term that may be used to characterize opponents of immigration. Other words: They were completely and totally against it.
Asked in Job Interviews, Citizenship and Marriage, Immigration, Education

Does anyone have a list of questions asked during the greencard interview for marriage?

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Some questions that may be asked are: Name and address. Name and Date of Birth of Spouse. When and where did you meet your spouse? Describe this 1st meeting. Did you make arrangements to meet again? Did you exchange phone numbers? When did you meet next? Where were you living at the time? Where was your spouse living? When did you decide to get married? Where were you at the time? Did you live together before marriage? When and where did you get married? How did you and your spouse get to the church, courthouse, etc.? Who were the witnesses to the ceremony? Did you exchange wedding rings? Where had you purchased these rings? Did you and your spouse purchase them together? Did you have a reception after the ceremony? Where was it held? Do you have any photos of the ceremony and /or reception? Describe the reception. Did any of your, and your spouse's, family members attend? If so, who? Did you go on a honeymoon? If so, when and where? If you did not have a reception, what did you do after the wedding ceremony? Where did you live after the wedding? Describe the place where you lived right after the marriage. Number of bedrooms and bathrooms; furnishings; color of walls, floor coverings, appliances, etc; type of air conditioning, heating, etc; # of telephones, televisions, etc. Do you have cable television? Where did you get the furniture? Was it already there, did you buy it, was it a gift, or did it come from your, or your spouse's, previous residence? If brought to the house or apartment, describe how it was transported. Describe your bedroom. Where do you keep your clothes? Where does your spouse keep his or her clothes? Where are the bathroom towels kept? Where do you keep the dirty clothes? Where is the garbage kept in the kitchen? On what day of the week is the garbage picked up? Where do you shop for groceries? Do you go together with your spouse? How do you get there? Where do you work? What days of the week do you work? What hours do you work? What is your salary? What is your telephone # at work? When was the last vacation you had from work? Did you and your spouse go anywhere together at that time? When was the last vacation you and your spouse took together? Where did you go? How did you get there? Describe it. Where does your spouse work? What days of the week? What hours? What is the salary, if you know? What is your spouse's telephone # at work? When was the last time your spouse got a vacation from work? Do you or your wife have any scars or tattoos? If so, where on the body? Do you know your spouse's family members? If so, which ones? If your spouse has children from a previous marriage, their names, ages, where they live, and where they go to school, if applicable. Where do you live now? (If different from where you lived right after the marriage, then go over the same questions as above). How much is the rent? When is it paid? How do you pay it? Do you have a bank account together? Where? What kind of account? (Checking, savings). Are both of you listed on the account? (Do you have a bank letter, cancelled checks, etc.?) Did you file a joint tax return this year? Do you have a copy with you? Do you own any property together? What property? Did you bring copies of the documents with you? What kind of automobile do you and your spouse have? Describe them. Do you have an insurance policy listing your spouse as the beneficiary? If so, do you have a copy? Have you taken any trips or vacations together? Do you have photos from these trips? Do you have any utility bills, or receipts from items you have purchased together? What other documentation do you have to show that you are living together as husband and wife? Do you have any pets? What kind, what are their names, and describe them? What did you do for Christmas, New Year's, your anniversary, or you or your spouse's last birthday? Did you exchange gifts? If so, what kind of gift? Did you or your spouse go to work yesterday? If so, at what time did you and/or your spouse leave the house and return? Who cooks the meals at the house? What is your spouse's favorite food? What is your favorite food? Does your spouse drink coffee? If so, does he or she use cream and/or sugar? Did you eat dinner together last night? Did anyone else have dinner with you? What did you have? What time was dinner served? Who cooked it? Did you watch TV after dinner? What shows did you watch? At what time did you go to bed? Who went to bed first? Did you have the air conditioning or heater on? Who woke up first this morning? Did an alarm clock go off? Did you or your spouse take a shower? Did you come to the interview together? Who drove? Did you have breakfast? Where and what did you eat? Basically, they are questions asked of you and your spouse and differences in answers will send up a red flag that will get the illegal deported and you persecuted.
Asked in Immigration, Passport Requirements, Human Rights, Visas - Document

What countries that Angolan passport holder enter visa free?

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43 countries... read here.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angolan_passport
Asked in Citizenship and Marriage, Immigration, Canada

Is it difficult for US citizens to relocate and seek employment in Canada?

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American Immigrants to Canada This info is from the citizenship and immigration Canada website. If you want to be a permanent resident, there's a point system where you have to score high enough. Having a college education is a lot of points; grad school is more. There are points for speaking English and French. There are also points for having job skills, and a chart tells you what skills are worth how many points. There's also a skilled worker program where you can get into Canada to work indefinitely. You have to have $9,500 for one person (that's Canadian dollars) and $12,000 for two people - there's a chart. This is to prove you can support yourself for six months, and I think you don't have to have the money if you have a job offer. You'd also have to qualify in terms of job skills. My granddaughter has lived in Whistler BC for several years now. She has worked as a waitress, etc. but was not allowed to work long because she had no work visa. She finally married a Canadian citizen and got a visa. You can "visit" Canada for six months without working. I would use the time to look for employment. Once you have a job offer, you can apply for immigrant status as a "skilled worker." See the official Canadian immigration site, www.cic.gc.ca I strongly suggest that you contact a Canadian Immigration office for official and ACCURATE information regarding emigrating to Canada. I am an American who lived in Canada for 11 years. Because I am married to a Canadian, my immigration situation was a bit different, but I can say without a doubt that "landed immigrant" does NOT denote someone who owns land...it is simply a formal designation of immigrant status, much like our "alien" status here in the U.S. You are not required to own land to be granted permanent residence status in Canada. However, what with NAFTA and probable subsequent rulings on immigration, I am sure that the requirements change frequently. Therefore, do not rely on possible internet misinformation, contact either the Canadian Embassy here or an Immigration office in any major Canadian city for accurate current information and requirements. Bottom line, it's not hard for a US Citizen to relocate to Canada if a) They have a job there. b) They are highly qualified in a desirable field. c) They have family members or friends in Canada willing to sponsor them. or d) They have spent at least 2 years attending a secondary or post-secondary school in CA, or working there. Canada welcomes hardworking immigrants especially if they are skilled and speak one (or both) of the official languages - English and French. Permanent resident status can lead to citizenship after 3 years. There are basically four ways to become a permanent resident: The Business-class Immigrant owns or plans to own a business in Canada. They have capital of at least $800,000CAD and will invest at least $400,000 CAD in a business once they arrive. There is also a self-employed individual program, which applies primarily to professional athletes and artists with works of cultural significance. The Skilled Worker program is probably your best bet. It extends permanent residence to people who have a job in CA. It also extends PR status to some people in highly skilled occupations that are in demand, to look for work. Skilled occupations include farming, high tech, and hospitality industry positions, among others. You must have at least $10,000 CAD per person to support yourself while you relocate. See the official Canadian Immigration website below for details, and an online quiz to qualify. The Family-class Immigrant has family members willing to sponsor them in Canada. Before you spend money on an expensive immigration lawyer, check out the official Canadian Govt. immigration website at www.cic.gc.ca, and spend a few weeks -- or months-- in the Province of your choice as a visitor. Who knows, you may even find a job while you're visiting. Congratulations for a most accurate and concise answer about Americans coming to Canada to live and work. I can't think of anything to add to your post, except that I wish more Americans would FOLLOW your advice, instead of simply assuming that they can "drop in and get a job " in Canada without any kind of Canadian Government paperwork or investigation of their background or education, as if they were moving from Ohio to Michigan.
Asked in Citizenship and Marriage, Immigration

How does immigration affect society in the us?

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before you get this conclusion, you should know what made the USA, the history of American immigration.
Asked in Immigration

How do you find your alien registration number?

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Not every non-citizen is issued an A-number, or Alien Registration number. The number issued to international students on Employment Authorization Documents was traditionally an alternate 9 digit number which was reserved just for students who acquired temporary work authorization. Any person who has received an immigrant visa, or been placed into removal proceedings, or more recently has been the beneficiary of an immigrant visa petition or certain specialized work visas get an A-number assigned to them. For Lawful Permanent Residents, the number is clearly shown on their Permanent Residency Card (sometimes called a 'green card'). Any official communication from USCIS to a person with an alien registration number will show the A-number, which is an 8 or 9 digit number beginning with the letter A, i.e. A123456789. If you have any documents from USCIS addressed to you, and you have an A-number, your A-number will be on the communication. When a person naturalizes to U.S. citizenship, the A-number is clearly shown on the upper right corner of the document. If you have no documentation, and you have lost your Permanent Resident Card or certificate of naturalization, you may make an Infopass appointment through the USCIS.GOV website: infopass.uscis.gov, to go to your local USCIS office with official photo identification, and using your birthdate and name an information officer will be able to look up your number. Of course, you should then submit an application to replace your lost document, and unfortunately, that can be somewhat expensive. As with any legal issue, this information is not a substitute for advice to your specific situation from a qualified immigration attorney, and if there is any doubt as to one's status under U.S. immigration law, presenting oneself at a USCIS office without seeking legal advice first may not be the most prudent course of action. Once you apply for an EAD card (employment authorization card) as an international student you will get the A#. The number will appear on the EAD card. There are other cases in which you get an A#, for example when you get an H1B Visa.
Asked in Immigration

How can you have an illegal immigrant deported from the US?

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No. YOU cannot have anyone deported. Only Immigration and Customs Enforcement can do so. Presently ICE is only focusing on crime-related deportations (since many "illegal" immigrants entered the country legally and were properly inspected but either had visas expire due to a variety of reasons some of which even include errors and oversights at DHS and USCIS (and its predecessor, INS) and is not pursuing otherwise law-abiding (and in most cases tax-paying) immigrants who have fallen out of status. You can, of course, report the individual to ICE but, if they do take action against them improperly you could very well be civilly liable to the person yourself if it is determined that your report to ICE was improper and selfishly or racially motivated.
Asked in Divorce and Marriage Law, Emancipation and Ages for Moving Out, Citizenship and Marriage, Immigration

What are the legal requirements to marry a US citizen for a foreign person in the US on a visa permit?

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Marriage requirements are the same for all people. Immigration status has no bearing on your right to marry. As long as you are not currently married and are over 18 years old, you should be able to obtain a marriage license. If you are not in the United States and you want to come to marry an American, than you will need to apply for a fiancee visa. Note however, that if you want to apply for a green card through marriage in the U.S. after the wedding, you shouldn't be on a visitors visa, since otherwise you will have to prove that you did not enter the U.S. with an intent to get married.
Asked in Immigration, Russia, Passport Requirements, Visas - Document

What countries are Russians visa free to?

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the countries that are visa free for Russians are belaruse, Thailand, Brazil, Venezuela, and china (but has to be a group of minimum 5 persons) and plus the former USSR countries. hope that helps
Asked in Citizenship and Marriage, Immigration, Green Cards

How long does a Chinese citizen with US green card have to be in the US per year?

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If he wants to KEEP a green card, he must live in the U.S. 6 months out of every year, although extensions are possible (such extensions are granted at the discretion of USCIS, you do NOT have a right to an extension) Another answer On the USCIS website, under "International Travel as a Permanent Resident," it says essentially: The rule of thumb is that if you are out of the country for over than a year, they may question whether you intended to make the US your permanent residence. Shorter trips may still be a problem, if they don't think you were intending to make the US your permanent country of residence. Under those circumstances, they may consider evidence such as family and community ties in the US, maintaining US employment, filing US income taxes, keeping a US mailing address and bank accounts, owning property or running a business in the US, maintaining a valid US driver's license, etc. Trips of six months or more may disrupt continuous residency for naturalization purposes, but there are ways around that. That page also mentions requirements of foreign countries (visas, etc.), requirements for reentry into the US, longer trips, etc.
Asked in Citizenship and Marriage, Law & Legal Issues, Immigration

Can non US citizen be buried in the US?

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Within limits yes; the body must undergo testing to ensure that it carries no communicable diseases.
Asked in Immigration, Switzerland, Passport Requirements, Visas - Document, Zurich

Do you need a visa to visit Zurich?

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This depends on what your nationality is. Best thing is to check with the Swiss Embassy in whatever country you live in.
Asked in Immigration, Income Taxes, Retirement Planning, Social Security

What is the normal wage for an adult working in a kitchen in a hospital with a social security number?

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In the US the federal Minimum Wage FOR 2010 IS 7.25 PER HOUR. SOME states do have different minimum wage amounts above the Federal minimum wage amount of 7.25. Today July 22 2010. Go to the LABORLAWCENTER com website
Asked in Immigration, Canada, Portugal, Passport Requirements, Visas - Document

Is Portugal a visa free country for Canadians?

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A Canadian Passport is required for Canadians intending to visit Portugal. The passport must be valid for at least three months beyond the date of your expected departure from the country. Tourist Visa: Not required (for stays less than 90 days in the Schengen Area) Business Visa: Not required (for stays less than 90 days in the Schengen Area) Student Visa: Required
Asked in Immigration

What does a permanent resident card expiry date mean?

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I think you are refering to green card. You need to renew, here's how: The Application Form The only way to renew your expiring Green Card is to file Form I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card. In the meantime, if you need confirmation of your status so that you can work or travel, you can make an appointment with your local USCIS field office through Infopass to get a temporary I-551 stamp on your passport until your new card arrives. This temporary proof of status is good for one year and that's good since it may take that long to receive your new Green Card. Now, if you are a conditional permanent resident who has a two-year green card and your Green Card is about to expire, DO NOT use Form I-90 to renew your expiring Green Card. In that case, you are required to file a petition to remove those conditions within 90 days of your card expiring by filing Form I-5751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence. If your conditional status was based on a marriage, you must also file Form I-5751.
Asked in Divorce and Marriage Law, Citizenship and Marriage, Immigration

Can a US citizen legally marry a person who is in the country with a tourist visa?

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Yes, even two non-citizens with visas can get married. Just bring your visa and passport to the county courthouse and register for a lisense. ------ You can get married, but you cant have the status of the non-immigrant adjusted if you get married in the USA without going through the proper K1 Visa process. Here is information on how to obtain a K1 Fiancee Visa http://fianceek1visa.blogspot.com/ www.visajourney.com
Asked in Citizenship and Marriage, Immigration, Green Cards

How long can a person with a 'greencard' stay outside the US without risking their legal status?

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You can stay out of the US for up to 6 months with no consequence, as long as the person has a vaild green card and passport. Over 6 months contact with the US consulate is needed and the green card holder can stay out of the country for up to a year. Over a year the green card holder will forfeit their green card and not be allowed to re-enter the country. * The US permanent resident CAN stay out of the country for more than a year if they apply for and are granted a re-entry permit by USCIS prior to leaving the country. However, for a PR to become a citizen, he/she must have 5 years of continuous residency and staying abroad for more than a year will typically break it regardless of whether a re-entry permit is issued/used.
Asked in Citizenship and Marriage, Immigration, Passport Requirements

You are a Canadian citizen visiting US Do you need to return to Canada to marry a US Citizen?

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If you are talking about getting married in Canada, then no paperwork is needed. In the US a fiancee's visa, which takes four months to get, is required. Answer nope.. you can get married but you won't be able to work. I AM LEGALLY married to an American man and i am Canadian. I got married to him on a visit last fall... right now, however we are living apart dealing with some of our own issues as to where to live. You can be married but you may not be able to work. As a Canadian you can visit up to 181 days without losing your medical plan back in Canada. Think about all the old ladies that live in Canada during the summer, and Florida in the winter....... they can visit, they just can't work legally.
Asked in Immigration, History of the United States, History of US Immigration

What have immigrants done to benefit the US?

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America since, as discovered by Christopher Columbus who called it Indies, as revealed in his book A NEW WORLD REVEALED, has been a country of immigrants who brought cultural diversity, new traditions, languages, knowledge experience etc. etc. from their respective countries to develop America into a strong Nation.
Asked in Immigration

How do you become a citizen of Australia?

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The best thing to do regarding information on citizenship is contact the Australian Department of immigration Go to the Web links below