Mayflower Compact

The first governing document of Plymouth County, the Mayflower Compact was written by the colonists (also known as the pilgrims) who came to America on the Mayflower seeking religious freedom.

2,336 Questions
American Revolution
Colonial America
Mayflower Compact

What was the written plan for government drawn up by the plymoth colonists?

The Mayflower Compact.

414243
Mayflower Compact

When did the Mayflower Compact start?

The 'Pilgrim Fathers' subscribed to a covenant for self-government - the Mayflower Compact - on their voyage to America in 1620 (on the board of the Mayflower - the ship).

394041
US Government
Mayflower Compact

How did the mayflower compact influence the american law and constitution?

The question " How was the Constitution influenced by the Mayflower Compact?" has a fairly simple answer. It is because the Constitution as is the Mayflower Compact were formed on the same bases. The bases of equality and the fact that everyone was created equal. It also indirectly states back to the Constitution that we all have unalienable rights. "Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit Of Happiness.\

313233
History of the United States
Colonial America
Government
Mayflower Compact

Why was Mayflower Compact important?

It was one of the first attempts at self-government in the English colonies

and they were promising to follow the laws that they made.

181920
History of the United States
Mayflower Compact

Where was the Mayflower Compact created?

At the northern tip of Cape Cod.

373839
Mayflower Compact

Who made the laws to the Mayflower Compact?

The Mayflower Compact contained no laws. It was an agreement written by the passengers of the Mayflower to follow Parliments laws and create a government.

373839
Mayflower Compact

Why was the Mayflower Compact an important document for the Plymouth Colony?

It established rules that all of the Pilgrims had to follow.

353637
Mayflower Compact

What does motive mean in history's terms?

it means to eat an ancient fruit

333435
Mayflower Compact

How did the writers of Mayflower Compact say laws would be decided?

majority rule of the group

333435
Mayflower Compact

How did the Mayflower Compact change America?

self-government

131415
Mayflower Compact

Where did the Mayflower Compact take place?

on the mayflower before they left the boat it was sign and written on the boat so when they stepped on the land they would be governed right away and didnt have to figure anything out or have anarchy.

333435
History of the United States
American Revolution
Declaration of Independence
Mayflower Compact

Why was the Declaration of Independence unnecessary?

okk Welll I have no ideaaaaaaa.

But I do know that the Declaration of Independence was written by Thomas Jefferson maybe??!!!!

What do you think???

333435
Abraham Lincoln
Declaration of Independence
Mayflower Compact

What does the declaration of independence promise?

aloysius u dumb

333435
Colonial America
Grammar
Mayflower Compact

Why did the pilgrims feel that this compact was necessary?

They signed the Mayflower Compact because the pilgrims wanted to live by the rules and work together with other pilgrims.

333435
Mayflower Compact

What did the Mayflower Compact contribute to the US government?

the mayflower compact help buy keeping laws in the land

313233
Mayflower Compact

The Mayflower Compact is most similar to what sort of document?

the declaration of independence

111213
Mayflower Compact

Where and when was the Mayflower Compact signed?

November 21, 1620 on the Mayflower.

293031
Mayflower Compact

Where did they sign the Mayflower Compact?

on the may flower it was an agreement that would govern the new world as the pilgrims would begin to live there like the Constitution

293031
History, Politics & Society
Colonial America
Mayflower Compact

Who was the primary founder of Plymouth Massachusetts?

Puritans

293031
History of the United States
Colonial America
Mayflower Compact
Jamestown Virginia Colony

Why was Jamestown satared?

The main reason was economically, especially for gold.

293031
Mayflower Compact

When did the pilgrams sign the Mayflower Compact?

In 1620 :) (a long time ago!)

272829
English Language
Economics
Definitions
Mayflower Compact

What does politics mean in a PESTLE analysis?

In PESTLE, politics means how once (country) polotical situation effects to any organization and its people. The political situation plays vital role in growth of any organzation.

262728
War and Military History
Colonial America
Mayflower Compact

How were colonial governments organized?

In addition to the brief account of the government of each colony in our narrative of the settlements, an account must here be given of colonial government as a whole.

The thirteen colonies are usually grouped, according to the form of government, into three classes--the Charter, the Royal, and the Proprietary; but recent historical criticism has reduced these three forms to two, the Corporation and the Proviucial.1 The corporation was identical with the charter form, and at the opening of the Revolution there were but three, including Massachusetts2 the other two being Rhode Island and Connecticut. The provincial forms included the proprietary colonies, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware, and the royal colonies, Virginia, the Carolinas, New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, and Georgia.

So variable were the forms of colonial government that but two colonies remained under the same form from the time of their founding to the Revolutionary War. These two were the chartered colonies of Rhode Island and Connecticut. It will be noticed that at the close of the colonial period the royal form of government predominated, seven of the thirteen being of this class. The movement against the chartered and proprietary colonies that brought about this condition was begun late in the reign of Charles II, was kept up for half a century, and ended in 1729 when the Carolinas became royal provinces. One colony, Georgia, was founded after this time, and, after flourishing for nineteen years as a proprietary colony, was passed over to the Crown (1752) according to the terms of its charter. Massachusetts was the first to fall a victim to this new policy, losing its charter in 1684. On receiving its new charter, in 1691, Massachusetts became a semi-royal province, and is by some writers placed in a class by itself. New York, New Jersey, and the Carolinas passed into royal hands during this crusade, and even the governments of Pennsylvania and Maryland were each for a short time taken from their respective proprietors.

By leaving out of consideration the two self-governing colonies, Rhode Island and Connecticut,3 we find the colonial governments strikingly uniform. Each consisted of three organs,4 (1) the governor, appointed by the Crown or by the proprietor, or proprietors, (2) the council, also appointed by the Crown, and (3) the assembly or house of representatives, elected by the people. These three, corresponding to the king and the two houses of Parliament, resembled the British government.

The governor directly represented the Crown or the proprietor. His position was a most difficult one to fill. Representing a higher power, by which he was appointed and from which he had explicit instructions, he nevertheless owed a duty to the people over whom he was placed, and the interests of the two were so conflicting as to keep the governor in a constant turmoil. The powers of the governor were extensive. He could convene, prorogue, or dissolve the legislature, or veto any of its laws. He had command of the militia, and he appointed many officials, such as judges, justices of the peace, sheriffs, and the like, and, especially in the early period, he had industrial, commercial, and ecclesiastical as well as political duties; but in one respect he was ever held in check--he had no power over the public purse. Many of the governors were honest men and faithful to their duties; but others, and perhaps the majority, were profligate men, the fruits of the spoils system of that day, who sold the offices at their disposal, and who cared little for the welfare of the colonists.

The council consisted usually of twelve men, though in Massachusetts there were twenty-eight, and in early Maryland but three. They had to be residents of the colony in which they served, and they were usually men of station and wealth. Appointed by the same power that appointed the governor, they usually sided with him in his conflicts with the assembly. The functions of the council were threefold,--it was a board of advisers to the governor, it constituted the upper house of the legislature, and it frequently formed the highest court of the colony. In Massachusetts, after 1691, the council was elected by a joint ballot of the legislature, called the General Court. In the other provincial colonies it was appointed by the Crown or the proprietors.

The assembly, or lower house of the legislature, represented the people and was elected by them. It had the chief legislative power; but its acts could be vetoed by the governor, or be set aside by the Crown within a certain time after their passage. But the assembly held the key to the situation by its sole power of taxation. To this right the assembly of every colony clung with jealous tenacity. Through the exercise of this right the colonles may be said to have been self-governing, and their liberties were secure so long as they could retain this sole right of taxing themselves. For many years the British government wrestled in vain with the problem of how to get an American revenue at the disposal of the Crown. The governor, representing the Crown, and the assembly, representing the people, were in frequent conflict during the whole colonial period; and the assembly usually won through its one all-powerful weapon--a withholding of supplies. On many occasions the assembly would refuse to grant the governor his salary until he had approved certain laws it had passed, though often his act was in direct violation of his instructions. Nor was it infrequent that the assembly grew arrogant and meddled in purely executive affairs, such as military matters, the appointment of officials, and the like, all through its power over the purse.

The legislature in every colony was bicameral, except in Pennsylvania and Georgia, in each of which it consisted of a single house. This bicameral system had its model in Parliament, but it seemed to spring up spontaneously in America. It began in Massachusetts in 1644, when the assembly or deputies first sat apart from the council or magistrates, and the two bodies henceforth remained separate. Other colonies soon followed the example, until all the legislatures came to be divided, except in Pennsylvania, where the governor's council had no legislative functions after 1701, and in Georgia. In Connecticut and Rhode Island, and in Massachusetts before 1684, the people elected the governor, and, aside from the Navigation and a few other restrictive laws, were practically independent of the Crown.

The representative system of government, as we have assumed all along in our narrative, was common to all the colonies, though it was not introduced in Georgia before 1752. It began in Virginia with the first meeting of the burgesses in 1619; it was introduced in Massachusetts in 1634, in Plymouth and Maryland in 1639. The system of representative government was allowed, but not required, by the early charters. But after it had sprung up spontaneously in various colonies, it was recognized and ratified by the later charters, as in those of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and the second charter of Massachusetts, though it was not mentioned in the New York grant. The franchise came to be restricted by some property qualifications in all the colonies, in most by their own act, as by Virginia in 1670, or by charter, as in Massachusetts, 1691.5 In no colony was universal suffrage to be found.


look after each other

or keep an group of people

111213
New York
History of the United States
Colonial America
Mayflower Compact

Why was the colony of NY created?

Because they felt like it OK Because they felt like it OK

262728
Mayflower Compact

How were the Mayflower Compact and house of burgesses important to self government?

they helped establish government

272829

Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.