Metal and Alloys

Metals are elements that are good conductors of electricity. An alloy is a metal made up of more than one element. Combining a metal with another metal or non-metal (alloying) can often improve the material's strength.

Asked in Metal and Alloys

Why is barium chloride soluble in water?

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Barium chloride, like most chlorides, is soluble in water. A solution of barium chloride is more disorganized than solid barium chloride, so entropy favors the solution over the solid.
Asked in Chemistry, Acids and Bases, Metal and Alloys

What happens when dilute acids react with chemically active metals?

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Hydrogen gas is evolved along with the formation of a salt. For example, when hydrochloric acid (HCl) is reacted with magnesium (Mg): 2 HCl + Mg --> MgCl2 + H2
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Annealing of steels is done to?

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Steel is annealed to bring it to a specific level of hardness, reducing its brittleness after heat treatment or forging.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

How do you get varnish off a stainless steel sink?

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Use acetone, usually your wife/girlfriend/mistress or husband will have some in the form of nail polish remover - check the label - it is a clear liquid, like water.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

What are gp zones?

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GP zones are the meta-stable phases (or precipitates), which, due to their high degree of dispersion and correspondingly large contribution to strength, are of primary interest. These precipitates are crystallographically coherent with the matrix and their fine dispersion enhances the mechanical properties of the alloy. GP is an abbreviation for Guinier and Preston, who first recognized these precipitates by X-ray scattering in 1938 while studying Cu-Al system. The size of these GP zones is of the order of few nanometers. Such small size is the primary reason of very high mechanical strengthening of the material. The exact structure and composition of the GP zones (I and II,) is still a matter of discussion. A GP I zone was considered to comprise a monolayer of Cu atoms on a {200} lattice plane, whereas GP II zones were understood to be composed of a multilayer of Cu and Al atoms. Some authors now propose that the different solvus curves for the GPI and GPII zones are probably just due to the different average zone thickness after different ageing times, since they observed a GPII zone to form by coarsening of a GPI zone. Other authors, and this is the more classical point of view, understand GPII zones as an ordered phase, with two Cu layers separated by three Al layers. Both GP I and GP II zones have plate-like morphology. This is due to the high lattice misfit and the anisotropic elastic properties of the matrix and the low specific interfacial energy.
Asked in Swimming Pools, Elements and Compounds, Metal and Alloys

Which above-ground pool is better - steel... stainless steel... panel or aluminum?

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Usually, the best and easiest way to determine is by looking at the prices: The higher the price, the better the pool. Stainless steel may be the best. But steel will be affected by chlorine and may rust eventually. Aliminum does not rust. Aluminum by nature is very soft, unless it is an "alloy," which would make it too rigid for above-ground pool construction. Above-ground pools need a certain amount of flexibility to accommodate water movement and temperature changes. It is also important is to make sure of the gauge of the walls! If the walls are not of at least 30 gauge, and have a deep corrugation (ridges in the wall) they not last as well.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

What is the texture of potassium?

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It is an extremely soft metal that can easily be cut with a blunt knife.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Is aluminum shiny or dull?

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Aluminium is shiny and lustrous as a metallic element.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Which is stronger titanium or osmium?

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I would not call osmium strong, because it is very problematic. However it is very heavy - may be the heaviest
Asked in Physics, Chemistry, Metal and Alloys

Why do solid and liquid metals conduct electricity?

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In metals electrons are delocated and are in a free movement.
Asked in Internet, Mechanical Engineering, Metal and Alloys

What is the tensile stress for mild steel rod?

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The tensile stress for mild steel is around 63,800 psi.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Copper is which type of solid?

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Copper is a metal & solid
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Is luster in Molybdenum?

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most definitely
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Why does Australia extract aluminium?

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Aluminium is a major industrial metal, and is refined from bauxite. Some of the refining is done in Australia, and some is refined in New Zealand at Te Wai Point at the south of NZs South Island.
Asked in Mechanical Engineering, Metal and Alloys

What is the difference between pig iron and steel?

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simply put: pig iron has around 3.5% to 4.5% carbon. whereas, steel has from 0.2% to 2% or 2.1% carbon.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Why is lithium used in batteries?

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Because the conductor in lithium is stronger Ap fueled than most other elements. Lithium-ion batteries also have a low density which enables it to store more electricity.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Why do you use aluminium for window frames?

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Aluminium is commonly used due to the fact that it does not rust or age with wear However it can be susceptible to corrosion around steel, especially stainless-steel, fastenings, in some atmospheric conditions such as salty moisture in coastal locations. It is also ductile so can be extruded in fairly complex sections needed for such applications.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

Is magnesium fluoride a solid?

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Magnesium fluoride is a white crystalline salt and so it is a solid.
Asked in Metal and Alloys

How many electrons does one atom of chromium have?

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the answer is 24 electrons and yes im only 14 yrs old again
Asked in Metal and Alloys

How is lithium used in your every day life?

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The most common use today is in small batteries.