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Spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is a branch of analysis devoted to identifying elements and compounds through the measurement of the absorption, scattering, or emission of electromagnetic radiation by atoms or molecules. It is widely used in physical and analytical chemistry, as well as in astronomy and remote sensing. Questions and answers here have to do with anything that has to do with Spectroscopy.

511 Questions

What is spin-lattice coupling?

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Asked by Wiki User

Spin-lattice coupling refers to the interaction between the spin of an electron (or other particle with spin) and the lattice structure of a material. This interaction can lead to changes in the spin orientation and energy levels of the electron due to its interaction with the surrounding lattice environment. Spin-lattice coupling is an important factor in phenomena such as spin relaxation and spintronics.

What is bending and stretching in spectroscopy IR and NMR?

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Asked by Wiki User

In spectroscopy, bending refers to the vibration of molecular bonds that cause changes in bond angles, typically seen in the infrared (IR) spectrum. Stretching refers to the vibration of molecular bonds that cause changes in bond lengths, often observed in both IR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra as characteristic peaks corresponding to different functional groups.

What information can be obtained from a sample analyzed using atomic absorption spectroscopy?

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Asked by Wiki User

Atomic absorption spectroscopy can provide information about the concentration of specific elements present in a sample. It can analyze elements such as metals at trace levels, giving insight into their presence and quantity. This technique is commonly used in various fields, including environmental analysis, food testing, and clinical research.

What is G band in raman spectroscopy?

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Asked by Wiki User

The G band in Raman spectroscopy refers to a specific peak observed in the Raman spectrum of carbon materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes. It corresponds to the in-plane vibrational motion of carbon atoms in a hexagonal lattice structure, known as the E2g phonon mode. The G band peak provides information about the degree of crystallinity and the sp2 hybridization of carbon atoms in the material.

What does dr.ir. short for?

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Asked by Wiki User

Dr.ir. stands for "Doctorandus ingenieur" in Dutch, which translates to "Master of Science in Engineering" in English. It is an academic title used in the Netherlands for those who have completed a technical engineering program at the master's level.

What is the adequate cuvette to work in far infrared?

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Asked by Wiki User

Quartz cuvettes are commonly used for far infrared measurements due to their transparency in this wavelength range. Additionally, CaF2 (calcium fluoride) cuvettes are also suitable for far infrared spectroscopy applications. It is important to select a cuvette material that is transparent to the specific wavelength range of interest in order to obtain accurate and reliable results.

What is the difference between IR and FT IR instruments?

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Asked by Wiki User

A standard IR runs a single spectrum. An FT-IR uses an interferometer and makes several scans and then uses Fourier Transforms to convert the interferogram into an infrared spectrum.

How does infrared spectroscopy identify organic compounds?

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Asked by Wiki User

Infrared spectroscopy identifies organic compounds by measuring the absorption of infrared radiation by the compound's functional groups. Each functional group absorbs infrared radiation at specific frequencies, which produce characteristic peaks in the IR spectrum. By comparing these peaks to reference spectra, the functional groups present in the compound can be identified.

What are the other regions of spectroscopy aside from the visible region?

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Asked by Wiki User

Other regions of spectroscopy include ultraviolet (UV), infrared (IR), microwave, radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Each region provides information about different aspects of a molecule's structure and behavior. UV spectroscopy is commonly used to study electronic transitions, while IR spectroscopy is utilized for molecular vibrations.

What is the difference ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy?

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Asked by Wiki User

Ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy involves measuring absorption of light in the UV region, typically ranging from 200 to 400 nm. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, on the other hand, involves measuring absorption of infrared radiation, typically in the range of 4000 to 400 cm-1. Both techniques provide information about molecular structure and functional groups present in a compound, but they probe different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Why lasserbeam uses in ftir?

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Asked by Wiki User

Lasers are used in FTIR spectroscopy to provide a monochromatic and intense light source, improving spectral resolution and sensitivity. This enhances the ability to detect specific functional groups and chemical bonds in the sample. Additionally, lasers offer stability and coherence, which are essential for precise measurements in FTIR analysis.

How many lumen are in 1 Joule?

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Asked by Wiki User

1 lumen = 1 candela per steradian.

1 candela = 1/683 watts per steradians (assuming 540nm light wavelength).

Assuming that the light is collected from a single steradian:

1 Lumen = 1 Candela -> = 1/683 Watt -> Watt = 683 Lumens

1 Joule = 1 Watt per Second -> Watt = Joule/Second

Hence:

683 Lumen = 1 Joule/Second

Under the above assumptions1 Lumen = 1/683 Joule/Second

Do supernovas emit gamma rays?

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Asked by Wiki User

Yes, supernovas emit gamma rays as part of the explosion process. These gamma rays carry a significant amount of energy and are one of the most powerful forms of radiation emitted during a supernova event.

What is ten to the eighth power hertz frequencies associated with?

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Asked by Quantum7

A frequency of 10^8 Hertz is associated with radio waves in the FM broadcasting range, typically used for commercial radio stations. This frequency range allows for the transmission of audio signals over long distances using electromagnetic waves.

What is the good and bad effect of lightning and thundering?

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Asked by Wiki User

The good effect of lightning and thundering is that it helps in nitrogen fixation in the soil, which is essential for plant growth. However, the bad effects include potential damage to property, injury to humans and animals, and starting wildfires.

What happens to light as it moves away from its source?

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Asked by Wiki User

As light moves away from its source, it spreads out and becomes less intense. This is known as light attenuation. The further the light travels, the more it scatters and loses energy, resulting in a decrease in brightness.

What is the infrared radiation emitted from a candle?

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Asked by Wiki User

The infrared radiation emitted from a candle is a type of electromagnetic radiation that is not visible to the human eye. It is produced as a result of the heat generated by the candle flame and can be felt as warmth by our skin.

Where can you see absorbed light?

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Asked by Wiki User

Absorbed light can be observed in objects that appear colored. When an object absorbs certain wavelengths of light and reflects others, our eyes perceive the reflected light as color. This phenomenon is what allows us to see different colors in our everyday surroundings.

What are photometry and spectroscopy?

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Asked by Wiki User

Photometry is the measurement of the intensity of light emitted or received by an object, usually used to study the brightness of celestial objects like stars. Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction between light and matter, often used to analyze the composition, temperature, and motion of objects based on the light they emit or absorb.

What is the temperature within a single electrical spark?

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Asked by Wiki User

The temperature within a single electrical spark can vary widely depending on the amount of current flowing and the conditions of the spark, but it can reach temperatures of up to 5000 degrees Celsius (9000 degrees Fahrenheit) in a fraction of a second.

What is a removable IR cut filter?

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Asked by Wiki User

A removable IR cut filter is a filter that can be placed in front of a camera's image sensor to block infrared light while allowing visible light to pass through. It is often used in photography and videography to improve color accuracy and clarity by preventing infrared contamination in the final image or video.

Why you get broad peak in UV spectroscopy instead of sharp peak?

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Asked by Wiki User

In UV spectroscopy, broad peaks can arise due to various factors such as sample impurities, solvent effects, or multiple overlapping absorption bands. These factors can lead to a less defined absorption peak due to the overall spectral contributions from these various sources, resulting in a broad peak instead of a sharp one.

What is IR ranges of Aspergillus fumigatus?

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Asked by Wiki User

Aspergillus fumigatus has characteristic infrared (IR) absorption bands in the range of 3600-3200 cm-1 (for O-H stretching), 1650-1600 cm-1 (for C=O stretching), and 1250-1000 cm-1 (for C-O stretching). These IR ranges can be useful for identifying the presence of A. fumigatus in samples.

How do you calculate the particle size in UV-vis spectroscopy?

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Asked by Wiki User

Particle size cannot be directly calculated from UV-vis spectroscopy. UV-vis spectroscopy is primarily used to study electronic transitions in molecules or nanoparticles, which can provide information on the material's absorbance spectrum. Particle size information can be obtained using techniques like dynamic light scattering or electron microscopy.

What scientific units are used to express the whiteness of lightbulbs?

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Asked by Johntorresbrooklyn

The whiteness of lightbulbs is typically expressed using the correlated color temperature (CCT) scale, measured in Kelvins. This scale describes the color appearance of the light emitted by the bulb, ranging from warm yellows (lower Kelvin values) to cool blues (higher Kelvin values).vocab-ccc