Tidal Power

Tidal Power is the energy of the moving water of the tides, which can be harnessed to generate electricity. This is a green, renewable energy of the future.

1,416 Questions
Environmental Issues
Energy
Tidal Power

What is the original source of tidal energy?

The gravity of the moon moves the water in tides.
The power of the moving tides and waves drive turbines to generate renewable and clean electricity.
Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, tides are driven primarily by the gravitational pull of the moon, and waves are driven primarily by the winds.

134135136
Oceans and Seas
Renewable Energy
Tidal Power

What are the advantages and disadvantages of alternative tidal power as an energy source?

Advantages:

  • Tidal energy is an alternative energy.
  • The energy produced is clean and non polluting.
  • There is no carbon dioxide or any other by-products released. It produces no greenhouse gases or other waste.
  • It is a renewable energy that will help reduce our reliance on the burning of fossil fuels.
  • There are two tides every day and they can be relied on. The energy is there for the taking.
  • So the electricity supply is constant and efficient.
  • Once you've built it, the energy is free because it comes from the ocean's power
  • It needs no fuel.
  • It produces electricity reliably.
  • Not expensive to maintain.
  • Tides are definitely predictable. There are two tides every day and they can be relied on. So the electricity supply is constant.
  • Offshore turbines and vertical-axis turbines are not ruinously expensive to build and do not have a large environmental impact.
  • A plant is expected to be in production for 75 to 100 years
  • Uses an abundant, inexpensive fuel source (water) to generate power
  • May protect coastline against damage from high storm tides and provide a ready-made road bridge

Disadvantages:

  • Holding back the tide allows silt to build up on the river bed.
  • The dams and barrages sometimes interfere with shipping.
  • You will need to find a way to connect the electricity to the grid.
  • Pose same threats as large dams, altering the flow of saltwater in and out of estuaries, which changes the hydrology and salinity and possibly negatively affects the marine mammals that use the estuaries as their habitat
  • Turbidity decreases as a result of smaller volume of water being exchanged between the basin and the sea.
  • The average salinity inside the basin decreases, also affecting the ecosystem
  • A barrage across an estuary is very expensive to build, and affects a very wide area - the environment is changed for many miles upstream and downstream. Many birds rely on the tide uncovering the mud flats so that they can feed.
  • There are few suitable sites for tidal barrages.
  • Only provides power for around 10 hours each day, when the tide is actually moving in or out.
  • It only provides about 7% of the power needed for England and Wales that means that some people get their energy close to free and some pay a lot of money
  • Water is not replenished, it cannot flow away so any dirt or pollution lingers around the coast much longer
  • Needs a very big piece of sea to be cost effective
  • Cannot be used inland
  • Barrage systems require salt resistant parts and lots of maintenance
  • Affects the lives of the people who rely on fishing for a means of living
  • Limited because the tide never speeds up or slows down, and occurs on 6 hour cycles. It is also dependent on the fetch distance. The fetch is the distance the tide rises and falls, so some beaches have a very small fetch, and others have a big fetch but hardly any have a large enough fetch to support tidal energy
  • Tidal energy is currently more expensive to generate than conventional energy or that from many other renewable sources.
  • Effects on marine life during construction phases.
  • Operation and control must be provided remotely and maintenance is complicated due to sea-basing of the generation facilities.
  • Sea-based moorings and towers to hold the generators must be placed on the sea bottom.
  • The generating facilities and mooring infrastructure are potential navigational hazards.
  • Is only available in a small number of regions - it requires a basin or gulf that has a mean tidal amplitude of 7 meters or more. Also need semi-diurnal tides where there are two high and low tides everyday.
  • Even with the best barrage designs, fish mortality rate per pass through the barrage is about 15%. Solutions to this problem have either failed or are too impractical and too expensive.
  • Dams used in the production of tidal power can raise tide levels.
  • Damages like reduced flushing, winter icing and erosion can change the vegetation of the area and disrupt the balance.
  • Expensive to construct
  • Power is often generated when there is little demand for electricity
  • Barrages may block outlets to open water. Although locks can be installed, this is often a slow and expensive process.
  • Barrages affect fish migration and other wildlife- many fish like salmon swim up to the barrages and are killed by the spinning turbines. Fish ladders may be used to allow passage for the fish, but these are never 100% effective. Barrages may also destroy the habitat of the wildlife living near it
  • Barrages may affect the tidal level - the change in tidal level may affect navigation, recreation, cause flooding of the shoreline and affect local marine life
  • Causes a continual loss of mechanical energy in the Earth-Moon system (Due to pumping of water through the natural restrictions around coastlines and viscous dissipation at the seabed and in turbulence.
  • May take additional energy from the system, increasing the rate of slowing. Estimates are 24 hours every 2000 years and a corresponding change in planetary orbit and climate.
636465
Renewable Energy
Tidal Power
Wave Power

What are the advantages and disadvantages of renewable tidal power?

Strictly, tidal power comes from the movement of the tides, and wave power comes from the movement of the waves. There are two kinds of tidal power stations:

  • Tidal stream systems, which use turbines turned by the moving water to generate electricity. Very like wind power.
  • Barrage systems. These are like dams built across rivers. After the tide comes in, the gates are closed. When the tide is low enough on the downstream side, the water flows through turbines rather like a hydro-electric dam.

Wave power consists of harnessing the movement of the waves. There are various pilot schemes of this at the moment.

AdvantagesThe advantages for using tidal and wave energy over different fossil fuels are plentiful, below there are several impressive benefits of using tidal and wave energy, including the factor of replacing a percentage of fossil fuel use.
  • It reduces the dependence upon fossil fuels
  • Tidal and wave energy is free, renewable, and clean source of energy
  • It produces clean electricity, with no production of greenhouse gas or pollution.
  • Tidal and wave energy generation and consumption creates no liquid or solid pollution
  • Highly efficient resource (compared with coal and oil at 30%, tidal power efficiency is about 80%)
  • Energy capturing and conversion mechanism may help protect the shoreline
  • Energy capturing and conversion mechanism has little visual impact
  • About 60 billion watts of energy from tides can be used for electricity generation
  • Tides are active 24 hours a day, 365 days a year
  • Tidal power is a renewable source of energy.
  • It produces energy for free, once the initial costs are recovered.

There are some devices that are very environmentally friendly like for example, the Salter Duck. This is a floating device that moves in a nodding motion with the passage of waves, generating electricity efficiently in the process. It cause no destruction to the marine animals and to the environment. This device can also serve as shelters for fish, seabirds and even seals.

Disadvantages
  • It is not cost effective because fossil-fuel power stations do not pay for the cost of their carbon emissions to the planet. This will change as fossil fuel is valued at its real price.
  • It leads to the displacement of wild life habitats.
  • It can only be used where there is suitable tidal flow or wave motion. So it can not be used inland.
  • It only produces electricity during tidal surges.
  • Barrage systems require salt resistant parts and lots of maintenance.
  • The frames of the turbines can disrupt the movement of large marine animals and ships through the channels on which the barrage is built.
  • today, power produced from tidal fences is still a bit expensive than that using conventional plants using coal and natural gas (but it can be cheaper if improved technologies and large-scale generation is applied).
  • the barrage systems have the disadvantages of disrupting fish migration and killing fish passing through the turbines, therefore, there is also the risk of destruction of ecosystem that rely on the coming and going of tides.
  • the ecosystem is disrupted during the construction of building the tidal fence. this affects the fishes and also the fishermen who depends their life on it.
  • Fossil fuels can be moved to just about anyplace to create energy on the spot. This is what allows a car to work while moving.
  • Tidal energy can only be created on a coast with a good tidal differential. Worthless for a landlocked country, has to be converted to something else to be transported
  • The main detriment is the cost of those plants, for constructing and running this facility with an annual output of 3423 GWh, is a cost about 1.2 billions, but this doesn't include operational and maintenance cost (coal and oil are cheaper).
  • Construction of strong, cheap and efficient conversion devices may be problematic
  • Technology isn't fully developed
  • Problems exist with the transportation of hydroelectricity
  • Ecological impacts relating to the alteration of tides and waves is not fully understood
  • Appropriate waves and tides are highly location dependent
  • Waves are a diffuse energy source, irregular in direction, durability and size
  • Extreme weather can produce waves of great intensity

The tide moves a huge amount of water twice each day, and harnessing it could provide a great deal of energy - around 20% of Britain's needs.

Although the energy supply is reliable and plentiful, converting it into useful electrical power is not easy.

There are eight main sites around Britain where tidal power stations could usefully be built, including the Severn, Dee, Solway and Humber estuaries.

Only around 20 sites in the world have been identified as possible tidal power stations.

Despite the fact that it's expensive, the technique isn't fully developed. There are still some uncertainties surrounding the conversion devices.

Advantages of Tidal energy:

  • It's free, after the initial setup
  • It's green with no harmful emissions
  • It's reliable and regular (unlike solar and wind)
  • Birdies fly high and flowers smell nice
  • it is constant
  • reliable
  • needs no fuel
  • produces no green house gases

Tidal stream systems are cheaper than the dam types and do less damage to the environment.

Disadvantages of Tidal energy:

  • Barrage (or dam) types are big, expensive and damage the environment somewhat like dams in a river.
  • kills fishies=(

    Advantages:

The electricity generated is renewable.

The set-up is non-polluting, no carbon-dioxide or other emissions.

There are two tides every day and they can be relied on. So the electricity supply is constant.

Disadvantages:

Some tidal power stations block a bay or estuary with dams or barrages making it difficult for shipping or fish.

It will decrease the wear on the shoreline, and transfer less material to the shoreline.

Disadvantages

  • Causes a continual loss of mechanical energy in the Earth-Moon system (Due to pumping of water through the natural restrictions around coastlines and viscous dissipation at the seabed and in turbulence.
  • Loss of energy has caused the rotation of the Earth to slow in the 4.5 billion years since formation losing 17% of its rotational energy.
  • May take additional energy from the system, increasing the rate of slowing over the next millions of years.
  • Pose same threats as large dams, altering the flow of saltwater in and out of estuaries, which changes the hydrology and salinity and possibly negatively affects the marine mammals that use the estuaries as their habitat
  • Turbidity decreases as a result of smaller volume of water being exchanged between the basin and the sea.
  • The average salinity inside the basin decreases, also affecting the ecosystem
  • A barrage across an estuary is very expensive to build, and affects a very wide area - the environment is changed for many miles upstream and downstream. Many birds rely on the tide uncovering the mud flats so that they can feed.
  • There are few suitable sites for tidal barrages.
  • Only provides power for around 10 hours each day, when the tide is actually moving in or out.
  • It only provides about 7% of the power needed for England and Whales that means that some people get their energy close to free and some pay a lot of money
  • It changes the coastline completely and the estuaries are flooded so any mud flats or habitats that birds or animals live on are destroyed
  • Water is not replenished, it cannot flow away so any dirt or pollution lingers around the coast much longer
  • Silt builds up behind the barrage
  • Disrupts creatures' migration in the oceans
  • Needs a very big piece of sea to be cost effective
  • Cannot be used inland
  • Only produces energy during tidal surges
  • The frames of the turbines can disrupt the movement of large marine animals and ships through the channels on which the barrage is built.
  • Barrage systems require salt resistant parts and lots of maintenance
  • Affects the lives of the people who rely on fishing for a means of living
  • Limited because the tide never speeds up or slows down, and occurs on 6 hour cycles. It is also dependent on the fetch distance. The fetch is the distance the tide rises and falls, so some beaches have a very small fetch, and others have a big fetch but hardly any have a large enough fetch to support tidal energy
  • Tidal energy is currently more expensive to generate than conventional energy or that from many other renewable sources.
  • Many sea animals require unobstructed access to migratory paths for feeding, reproduction and seasonal migration.
  • Effects on marine life during construction phases.
  • Operation and control must be provided remotely and maintenance is complicated due to sea-basing of the generation facilities.
  • Sea-based moorings and towers to hold the generators must be placed on the sea bottom.
  • The generating facilities and mooring infrastructure are potential navigational hazards.
  • reduced flushing, winter icing and erosion considerably change the ecosystem
  • Is only available in a small number of regions - it requires a basin or gulf that has a mean tidal amplitude of 7 metres or above. Also need semi-diurnal tides where there are two high and low tides everyday.
  • Even with the best barrage designs, fish mortality rate per pass through the barrage is about 15%. Solutions to this problem have either failed or are too impractical and too expensive.
  • Tides are predictable, but power stations only generate power when the tide is flowing in or out of the basin, which only happens during certain times of the day.
  • Dams used in the production of tidal power can raise tide levels.
  • The altering of the ecosystem at the bay
  • Damages like reduced flushing, winter icing and erosion can change the vegetation of the area and disrupt the balance.
  • only available in a small number of regions
  • Expensive to construct
  • Power is often generated when there is little demand for electricity
  • Limited construction locations
  • Barrages may block outlets to open water. Although locks can be installed, this is often a slow and expensive process.
  • Barrages affect fish migration and other wildlife- many fish like salmon swim up to the barrages and are killed by the spinning turbines. Fish ladders may be used to allow passage for the fish, but these are never 100% effective. Barrages may also destroy the habitat of the wildlife living near it
  • Barrages may affect the tidal level - the change in tidal level may affect navigation, recreation, cause flooding of the shoreline and affect local marine life

Advantages:

  • Once you've built it, tidal power is free.
  • It produces no greenhouse gases or other waste.
  • It needs no fuel.
  • It produces electricity reliably.
  • Not expensive to maintain.
  • Tides are totally predictable.
  • Offshore turbines and vertical-axis turbines are not ruinously expensive to build and do not have a large environmental impact.

· Tidal energy is renewable. The tides will continue to ebb and flow, and the energy is there for the taking.

  • Doesn't require any fuel
  • A plant is expected to be in production for 75 to 100 years
  • Clean and renewable
  • Does not generate emissions or wastes
  • Uses an abundant, inexpensive fuel source (water) to generate power
  • Electricity is reliably generated (tides are predictable)
  • May protect coastline against damage from high storm tides and provide a ready-made road bridge

In most cases, nothing can stop tidal flows as they are huge masses of water with lots of energy behind them. As long as the moon exists, and as long as the earth spins, the tides will come in and go out and rotate a turbine - all for an initial upfront one-off cost with a whole pile of maintenance considerations.

A disavantage about tidal energy is that it harms fish

No pollution to the environment to generate.

Disadvantages

  • Causes a continual loss of mechanical energy in the Earth-Moon system (Due to pumping of water through the natural restrictions around coastlines and viscous dissipation at the seabed and in turbulence.
  • Loss of energy has caused the rotation of the Earth to slow in the 4.5 billion years since formation losing 17% of its rotational energy.
  • May take additional energy from the system, increasing the rate of slowing over the next millions of years.
  • Pose same threats as large dams, altering the flow of saltwater in and out of estuaries, which changes the hydrology and salinity and possibly negatively affects the marine mammals that use the estuaries as their habitat
  • Turbidity decreases as a result of smaller volume of water being exchanged between the basin and the sea.
  • The average salinity inside the basin decreases, also affecting the ecosystem
  • A barrage across an estuary is very expensive to build, and affects a very wide area - the environment is changed for many miles upstream and downstream. Many birds rely on the tide uncovering the mud flats so that they can feed.
  • There are few suitable sites for tidal barrages.
  • Only provides power for around 10 hours each day, when the tide is actually moving in or out.
  • It only provides about 7% of the power needed for England and Whales that means that some people get their energy close to free and some pay a lot of money
  • It changes the coastline completely and the estuaries are flooded so any mud flats or habitats that birds or animals live on are destroyed
  • Water is not replenished, it cannot flow away so any dirt or pollution lingers around the coast much longer
  • Silt builds up behind the barrage
  • Disrupts creatures' migration in the oceans
  • Needs a very big piece of sea to be cost effective
  • Cannot be used inland
  • Only produces energy during tidal surges
  • The frames of the turbines can disrupt the movement of large marine animals and ships through the channels on which the barrage is built.
  • Barrage systems require salt resistant parts and lots of maintenance
  • Affects the lives of the people who rely on fishing for a means of living
  • Limited because the tide never speeds up or slows down, and occurs on 6 hour cycles. It is also dependent on the fetch distance. The fetch is the distance the tide rises and falls, so some beaches have a very small fetch, and others have a big fetch but hardly any have a large enough fetch to support tidal energy
  • Tidal energy is currently more expensive to generate than conventional energy or that from many other renewable sources.
  • Many sea animals require unobstructed access to migratory paths for feeding, reproduction and seasonal migration.
  • Effects on marine life during construction phases.
  • Operation and control must be provided remotely and maintenance is complicated due to sea-basing of the generation facilities.
  • Sea-based moorings and towers to hold the generators must be placed on the sea bottom.
  • The generating facilities and mooring infrastructure are potential navigational hazards.
  • reduced flushing, winter icing and erosion considerably change the ecosystem
  • Is only available in a small number of regions - it requires a basin or gulf that has a mean tidal amplitude of 7 metres or above. Also need semi-diurnal tides where there are two high and low tides everyday.
  • Even with the best barrage designs, fish mortality rate per pass through the barrage is about 15%. Solutions to this problem have either failed or are too impractical and too expensive.
  • Tides are predictable, but power stations only generate power when the tide is flowing in or out of the basin, which only happens during certain times of the day.
  • Dams used in the production of tidal power can raise tide levels.
  • The altering of the ecosystem at the bay
  • Damages like reduced flushing, winter icing and erosion can change the vegetation of the area and disrupt the balance.
  • only available in a small number of regions
  • Expensive to construct
  • Power is often generated when there is little demand for electricity
  • Limited construction locations
  • Barrages may block outlets to open water. Although locks can be installed, this is often a slow and expensive process.
  • Barrages affect fish migration and other wildlife- many fish like salmon swim up to the barrages and are killed by the spinning turbines. Fish ladders may be used to allow passage for the fish, but these are never 100% effective. Barrages may also destroy the habitat of the wildlife living near it
  • Barrages may affect the tidal level - the change in tidal level may affect navigation, recreation, cause flooding of the shoreline and affect local marine life

Advantages:

  • Once you've built it, tidal power is free.
  • It produces no greenhouse gases or other waste.
  • It needs no fuel.
  • It produces electricity reliably.
  • Not expensive to maintain.
  • Tides are totally predictable.
  • Offshore turbines and vertical-axis turbines are not ruinously expensive to build and do not have a large environmental impact.

· Tidal energy is renewable. The tides will continue to ebb and flow, and the energy is there for the taking.

  • Doesn't require any fuel
  • A plant is expected to be in production for 75 to 100 years
  • Clean and renewable
  • Does not generate emissions or wastes
  • Uses an abundant, inexpensive fuel source (water) to generate power
  • Electricity is reliably generated (tides are predictable)
  • May protect coastline against damage from high storm tides and provide a ready-made road bridge

In most cases, nothing can stop tidal flows as they are huge masses of water with lots of energy behind them. As long as the moon exists, and as long as the earth spins, the tides will come in and go out and rotate a turbine - all for an initial upfront one-off cost with a whole pile of maintenance considerations.

The use of tidal energy is very beneficial for the environment and has no disadvantages. The only investment is expensive.

636465
Science
Physics
Tidal Power

Is tidal energy a good source for your community?

Not if you live in a desert, yes if you live near water with a large tidal range.

757677
Physics
Electrical Engineering
Tidal Power

How does tidal energy generate electricity?

Harnessing water flow to drive turbines and electric generators.

707172
Tidal Power

Is there any bad things about Tidal power?

Yes, tidal power usually involves damming an estuary and this can affect the sediment balance in the estuary and also the movement of species up and down the estuary and cause the loss of intertidal habitats.

555657
Physics
Electrical Engineering
Tidal Power

How does a generator work?

A generator is a electro-mechanical device which converts kinetic energy into electrical energy. The basic concept is when a wire passes through a magnetic field, it causes the electrons to flow perpendicular to the field. Remember the right hand rule? If your fingers are in the direction of the field, your thumb is the direction of electrical current. Depending on the type of motor, the rotor (shaft) and stator (houses the rotor) will contain the wires or magnets. A motor is no different then a generator as it provides the kinetic energy by applying electrical energy.

474849
Electric Windows
Volvo 240
Ford Explorer XLT
Tidal Power

The power windows do not work on your 1985 Volvo the 16a fuse is good is there another power source?

Make sure you have the power connected to the switch, by taking a flat head screw driver and pop the whole plated that hold the buttons and make sure it's connected. ========== In my 1990, I had a broken power wire in between the door and the door mounts. Open your door and look for an accordion-like black wire protector. Remove it and check the now revealed window wire harness. The black wire is a power jumper that goes to all window up, down, on and off switches. Volvos are notorious for corroded wires and casings.

484950
Physics
Canada
Energy
Tidal Power

Where is tidal energy available in Canada?

Although it's 'available' at every point on every seacoast in the world, I'm not aware that

it's in use anywhere in North America, but it is being planned/engineered somewhere

in Scandinavia. I hope someone proves me wrong and tells us it is in use in Canada

or elsewhere.

454647
Environmental Issues
Energy
Tidal Power

Why is tidal energy a limited source of energy?

Tidal energy is an nonpolluting inexhaustible energy source. However, its use is limited because it needs a large bay or estuary with a narrow outlet to the sea where there is fast moving water. There are not many suitable locations around the world for tidal power technology as it exists today.

454647
Energy
Nuclear Energy
Geothermal
Tidal Power

Why can geothermal energy tidal power and nuclear energy not be traced back to the sun?

Geothermal, tidal, and nuclear energy cannot be traced back to the sun because they do not come from the sun. Geothermal energy is energy extracted from heat trapped in Earth's mantle. Some of this heat is left over from Earth's accretion billions of years ago, and some of it is produced by the decay of radioisotopes in the mantle. Nuclear power is derived from the fission of radioactive isotopes of elements like uranium, plutonium, and thorium. These are the same radioactive materials that heat the Earth via a much slower, natural decay process. These materials were originally formed by a supernova, or exploding star, but they were not produced by our sun. Tidal power is produced by harnessing the changing tides. The tides are a result of the Moon's gravitational influence on Earth's oceans.

394041
Environmental Issues
Solar Power
Tidal Power

Why do people use solar power?

People use solar power to heat water and create electricity. When considering the cost of electricity and the available state and federal incentives, solar power is a very smart financial decision. Basically, solar power is the right thing to do for the environment and the economy.

There is no other source of energy on the planet more reliable than solar power. There is no pollution or greenhouse effect. It needs no refinement, it's ready to go.

373839
Nuclear Energy
Fossil Fuels
Tidal Power

Which year was tidal power first used?

Back in the Middle Ages there were tidal water mills.

394041
Inventions
Tidal Power
The Difference Between

Does tidal method use turbine generators?

No. String and pully.

394041
Science
Oceanography
Tidal Power
Wave Power

How do waves and tides affect the shoreline?

Eight shoreline features that are created by wave erosion are sea cliffs, spits, baymouth bars, sea caves, sea arches, headlands and wave-cut terraces.

394041
Tidal Power
Wave Power

Why is hydroelectric energy important?

Hydroelectic energy is important because it is primarily a renewable energy source i.e. It can be used over and over again. This is important in the society of today as the awareness of the effects of non-renewable energy sources are more widely known, placing a greater importance on sustainable sources of energy.

212223
Physics
Energy
Chemical Energy
Tidal Power

What are the advantages of heat energy?

Heat energy is the amount of heat used to energize or to produce heat.

282930
Inventions
Isuzu Impulse
Mechanical Engineering
Tidal Power

How does a turbine work?

Literally saying, a turbine is a machine that transforms rotational energy from a fluid that is picked up by a rotor system into usable work or energy. Turbines achieve this either through mechanical gearing or electromagnetic induction to produce electricity.

Types of Turbines.

Some major types of turbines include steam turbines, wind turbines, gas turbines or water turbines, Or a rotary engine actuated by the reaction or impulse or both of a current of fluid (such as water, steam, or air) subject to pressure and usually made with a series of curved vanes on a central rotating spindle.

Working.

It works by turning wind or steam into electricity using the aerodynamic or corresponding force from the rotor blades, which work like an airplane wing or helicopter rotor blade. When wind flows across the blade, the air pressure on one side of the blade decreases.

The difference in air pressure across the two sides of the blade creates both lift and drag. The force of the lift is stronger than the drag and this causes the rotor to spin. The rotor connects to the generator, either directly or indirectly.

8910
Home Electricity
Energy
Tidal Power

What is the advantage of using electricity?

It makes life a lot eaiser, and frees up a lot of time to do other things, it also preserves things longer, makes your nights brighter, it can also provide electron flow in the summer to keep you cool, lasers for the eyes help to make people see again.

It is hard to find this answer on google so try different sights

The best way to find out is to live for 24 hours without using it.

363738
Fossil Fuels
Hydro Power
Tidal Power

What advantage do fossil fuels have over tidal energy?

Fossil fuels can be moved to just about anyplace to create energy on the spot. This is what allows a car to work while moving.

Tidal energy can only be created on a coast with a good tidal differential. Worthless for a landlocked country, has to be converted to something else to be transported.

353637
Earth Sciences
Oceans and Seas
Tidal Power

What do you call the rise and fall of the sea?

The rise and fall of the sea is known as the tide. The tides are caused by the moon's gravitational pull on earth. So, when the moon is facing a certain side of the earth, it literally pulls the water towards it.

The daily cycle of the rising and falling of the sea level is called the tide. The tide rises and falls about 4 times in 24 hours and the period in between cycles when the tide is neither rising or falling is called the slack tide.

The moon's gravitational pull affects tides. the tide will be high when the moon is visible because of its pull.

272829
Math and Arithmetic
Allusion and Innuendo
Tidal Power

Can you use tidal power in everyday life?

Tidal power produces electricity, the same electricity that you use in everyday life.

Some countries are planning systems that will use the tides as a source of renewable energy. That is an extremely good idea.

333435
Physics
Tidal Power

How is tidal energy collected?

turbines are placed underwater in areas which have high tidal movement. These turbines are designed to capture the energy produced by the tidal movement and is then transformed into electricity.

The tide moves a huge amount of water twice each day, and harnessing it could provide a great deal of energy - around 20% of Britain's needs.

Although the energy supply is reliable and plentiful, converting it into useful electrical power is not easy.

There are eight main sites around Britain where tidal power stations could usefully be built, including the Severn, Dee, Solway and Humber estuaries. Only around 20 sites in the world have been identified as possible tidal power stations, because they need a large bay or estuary with a narrow outlet to the sea.

323334
Physics
Tidal Power

How is tidal energy gathered?

turbines are placed under the water. the turbines capture the kintic energy of the waves

313233
Physics
Tidal Power

How do tidal turbines work?

Tidal Turbines work when the tide goes in and out. The force from the movement of the water spins the turbines.

313233

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