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Can an employer use the working spouse rule to force a self-employed spouse to get her own health insurance when the premiums would exceed her income?

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No,
Working Spouse Rule If both you and your spouse work for Vought Aircraft, one of you can opt out of medical and dental coverage and the other spouse can cover both of you. Or, each spouse can elect separate coverage. However, only one of you can cover your eligible dependents for medical and dental benefits. Both of you can cover eligible dependents for optional benefits, such as optional life.
If your spouse works for a company other than Vought Aircraft and has medical coverage available through that employer, Vought requires that your spouse enroll in that employer's medical plan if the employer pays 50% or more of the cost of the plan. Your spouse's plan becomes the "primary" payer, and your Vought coverage becomes your spouse's secondary insurance.
A change in your spouse's employment status (termination or beginning of employment, for example, or a significant change in insurance coverage) qualifies as a change in life status that allows you to change your benefit elections during the plan year.
http://benefits.voughtaircraft.com/employees/CBU/enrollment/workingspouse.htm
for more info. see www.steveshorr.com/
Thanks for the feedback!

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