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How can i void a quit claim deed in Mississippi?

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Answered 2008-04-06 18:10:43

last I checked you can not void a quit claim, what are your reasons?

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As long as the deed is valid, you cannot void a quitclaim deed. You would have transferred your interest to the grantee and you no longer own the property. You would need a deed from the grantee to restore your ownership.


You would need to hire an attorney and go to court and provide proof of your claim. Then the quit claim deed would have to be made null and void.


Yes, a judge can declare a deed null and void under certain circumstances such as an owner executing a deed to avoid creditors, fraud by one of the parties to the deed, undue influence or forgery.


There may be a statute of limitation on the criminal charges. However, the deed is null and void and does not convey the real estate if it is proved to be a forgery.


If you own the property as tenants by the entirety you should NOT execute a quitclaim deed until you have consulted with an attorney. Further, a conveyance to avoid creditors can be rendered void by a court.


A valid deed cannot be nullified. If you were misled into signing a quitclaim deed and can prove it, then yes. The deed could be made null and void by a court order. It is going to be very difficult however. The language in a quitclaim deed leaves no uncertainty as to what rights you are giving up by signing it.


Only by divorce, signing a Quit Deed to release Dower Rights or by the death of the dower.


The Grantee of a quit claim deed only receives whatever title the grantor had, if any, in the real property. In many states the order of recording establishes the real property rights and it is very likely that the grantee of the QCD is subject to the Attorney Lien because it was recorded first. In addition, if the Grantor executed the QCD in order to avoid the attorney's lien without receiving compensation for the title transfer, that QCD may constitute a conveyance in fraud of creditors and be held by a bankruptcy court to be void.


You cannot correct an error in an unrecorded deed when the grantor has died. You need to take the matter before a judge and request the court's help in making the necessary corrections, depending on the nature of the error. The deed may be deemed null and void. In that case, the grantor's estate must be probated and you must get a deed from the estate or from the heirs. You need to have your situation reviewed by an attorney who specializes in real estate law in your jurisdiction.


Are legal documents signec in hospital null and void? Why would they be? Would a document signed in a University hold more weight than one signed in a grade school? No. It doesn't matter what building you are in. You could also sign the document outside or in a car. The place you sign the document doesn't matter.


This is an interesting question. A person cannot convey what they do not own. If there was only one property described in the deed and the grantor does not own that property then that deed is a nullity, in other words, legally void. It would be ignored in the chain of title for that property. If several properties were described in the deed and one was not owned by the grantor then only the "conveyance" of that one property would be null and void and the deed would be effective as to the other properties that were owned by the grantor.


Dr Patel may have an issue with the fact that property claim is nul in void. Otherwise, the property claim is of no use to the doctor and is considered to be a document of which is invalid.


A null and void title would indicate that the deed that created it contained such serious defects that it failed to convey the fee. The problem may be as simple as the person who conveyed the property didn't own it. The deed would be null and void. However, there are dfferent laws in every state that can render a deed null and void. In some states it takes a substantial problem to nullify a deed. In some states one tenant by the entirety cannot convey their interest. If they executed a deed it would be null and void. In Massachusetts there is nothing in the law to prevent one tenant by the entirety from conveying their interest subject to the survivorship rights of the other tenant. I recently heard of a situation in Connecticut where a fiduciary inadvertantly recited warranty covenants in their deed. Fiduciaries are not permitted to give warranty deeds. Instead of extinguishing the warranty covenants by a simple operation of law- under Connecticut law the deed was considered null and void.


Generally it would be considered bad form for a notary to acknowledge the signature of a spouse who will benefit from the document. In some jurisdictions it may be voidable.



That decision would need to be rendered by a judge. The deed is null and void and the property remains in the estate of the owner.


The claim will be null and void at the first instance,if the eventuality happens with a suspended license.


No. A deed to oneself is null and void. Think about it. It doesn't do anything. It tries to convey land to you that you already own.


The grantees on the most current deed are the new owners. Once an owner transfers their interest by deed they no longer own the property. Their own deed isn't revoked, they simply have no more rights of ownership. Their deed is null and void. In order to perfect your title all the owners must sign the deed transferring the property to you.Your question is somewhat confused. If the prior owner of a property signed a quitclaim deed to someone else, they have already conveyed the property and cannot convey it to you.The grantees on the most current deed are the new owners. Once an owner transfers their interest by deed they no longer own the property. Their own deed isn't revoked, they simply have no more rights of ownership. Their deed is null and void. In order to perfect your title all the owners must sign the deed transferring the property to you.Your question is somewhat confused. If the prior owner of a property signed a quitclaim deed to someone else, they have already conveyed the property and cannot convey it to you.The grantees on the most current deed are the new owners. Once an owner transfers their interest by deed they no longer own the property. Their own deed isn't revoked, they simply have no more rights of ownership. Their deed is null and void. In order to perfect your title all the owners must sign the deed transferring the property to you.Your question is somewhat confused. If the prior owner of a property signed a quitclaim deed to someone else, they have already conveyed the property and cannot convey it to you.The grantees on the most current deed are the new owners. Once an owner transfers their interest by deed they no longer own the property. Their own deed isn't revoked, they simply have no more rights of ownership. Their deed is null and void. In order to perfect your title all the owners must sign the deed transferring the property to you.Your question is somewhat confused. If the prior owner of a property signed a quitclaim deed to someone else, they have already conveyed the property and cannot convey it to you.


A guardianship deed means the owner of the real estate was/is the ward of a court appointed guardian. When any buyer accepts a deed from a guardian they must make certain the guardian was appointed by a court of jurisdiction, that they are the current guardian and that they had a license from the court where the land lies to sell the real estate. If all three factors are not present then their deed will be null and void.


Selling your car with insurance claim pending, will simply null and void your insurance claim. Because your damaged car can be subjected to inspection by the Assessor of the Insurance Co. for assessment of the insurance claim any time.


An executor's deed is a deed executed by the executor of an estate when the executor conveys the real estate owned by the decedent. The executor must have the authority to convey. Laws vary but generally, if the authority is not granted in the will then the executor must petition the court for a license to sell real estate. Unless the executor has authority under the law, in the will or by a license their deed would be null and void.


Under the right circumstances it can get you a new trial if you claim your trial lawyer was incompetent. However, that usually occurs only with serious criminal actions and only after the defendant has written letters for years to people and agencies who might help.In a civil matter it would get any legal document such as a will, power of attorney, contract, trust, deed, etc judged null and void.Under the right circumstances it can get you a new trial if you claim your trial lawyer was incompetent. However, that usually occurs only with serious criminal actions and only after the defendant has written letters for years to people and agencies who might help.In a civil matter it would get any legal document such as a will, power of attorney, contract, trust, deed, etc judged null and void.Under the right circumstances it can get you a new trial if you claim your trial lawyer was incompetent. However, that usually occurs only with serious criminal actions and only after the defendant has written letters for years to people and agencies who might help.In a civil matter it would get any legal document such as a will, power of attorney, contract, trust, deed, etc judged null and void.Under the right circumstances it can get you a new trial if you claim your trial lawyer was incompetent. However, that usually occurs only with serious criminal actions and only after the defendant has written letters for years to people and agencies who might help.In a civil matter it would get any legal document such as a will, power of attorney, contract, trust, deed, etc judged null and void.


That depends on the circumstances and whether the court is provided with compelling evidence that the deed was executed under some sort of duress or fraud. The judge will review the case by hearing testimony, examining evidence and reviewing any controlling law and will issue a decision as to the validity of the deed.


If your spouse is on the deed and you do not want the lien placed on the house, do the quit-claim deed although I don't know that this will stop the lien. Check with an attorney as I found this about Spousal Rights : Dower and curtesy have been abolished in Alabama. ALA Code Sec. 43-8-57 (1975) Alabama is not a community property state. Alabama does recognize homestead rights ALA. Code Sec. 6-10-3. No conveyance of the homestead by a married person is valid without the voluntary signature and assent of the spouse and the proper acknowledgment under ALA Code Sec. 35-4-29. If I am reading this right, by the homestead right, a lien cannot be placed if the spouse no longer owns the property but....there might be a time frame involved. In other words, if the lien and quit-claim were done with-in days of each other the quit-claim might be revoked if contested by the lender. Again check with an attorney. * No. It is against the law to transfer, sell or take other action concerning property when litigation has begun. Such action could and likely would be seen as a "fraudlent conveyance" (an attempt to shield assets from creditor action) and any such action would be deemed null and void by the court. Alabama is a Tenancy-By-The-Entirety state, therefore, real marital property is not subject to attachment or seizure by creditors when only one spouse is the debtor. The non debtor spouse should confirm that the deed to the property is held as TBE or states "John Smith and his wife Mary Smith" or some such designation as to show the couple hold the property as man and wife.



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