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How long does your employer have to hold your job for you when you are out sick?

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2012-04-04 18:53:51
2012-04-04 18:53:51

You will be replaced, as the job still needs to be done. You should keep the employer advised as to your health and treatment that you are getting from your Doctor, and especially "When you will be coming back to work". An employer will appreciate being informed, instead of wondering "whats up with you".

The legal requirements vary from place to place, but a good worker will be less likely to be dropped than a bad one.

According to the US Family Medical Leave Act, you can take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave in a 12-month period for a documented serious illness. Your employer has to give you a job when you come back. BUT they only have to give you A job when you return, it doesn't have to be the same job. It could have different duties and a lower pay scale. (This is the same law that applies to new and adoptive parents) Smaller companies are exempt from this act.

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