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Repossession
Used Car Buying

Is it a voluntary repossession if the vehicle broke down and was towed back to the dealer one day after it was purchased?


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2015-07-16 18:11:07
2015-07-16 18:11:07

If you 'returned" it as in "I dont want this car anymore and I am NOT gonna give you a chance to repair it", then it was a vol repo. If it was towed in for repair and you never came back to get it from the repair shop, then it was a repo. If you havent paid any payments on the contract you signed, it was a 1st payment DEFAULT and a repo.Unless you got the lender to agree to a clause in the contract that said"if the car breaks down, I DONT have to pay", then it is a repo. Did I miss anything?

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No, you cannot just return it to the dealer. The dealer has nothing to do with this unless the dealer is also the lender. You must return it to the entity who loaned you the money to buy the car in the first place. It is their car until you pay for it. This is called a voluntary repossession. You will be required to pay the deficiency. That is the difference in what you owe on the vehicle and what they sell it for at auction or private sale. Your credit will also be ruined for 7 years. You will save repossession fees by turning it in voluntarily.

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Not unless you sold it back to them.

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The 2002 Toyota Tundra can be purchased at any local reliable motor vehicle dealer, or a local Toyota vehicle dealer. It can be also purchased via private sellers.

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The "voluntary repossession" allows the purchaser who has defaulted the loan to avoid having to pay a repossession fee of a few to several hundred dollars. That is the ONLY advantage to the purchaser.The dealership has the vehicle back in it's possession and can unload it at an auction without having to pay a repossession fee to a repossession agent (because the purchaser "voluntarily" surrendered the vehicle).Once a car is repossessed, voluntary or not, it is (at least in most states) sent to an auction to be sold and the proceeds applied to the outstanding debt of the borrower.Usually, there are specialized auction houses dealing solely, or nearly solely with repossessed vehicles and the vehicles NEVER (that I'm aware of) bring anywhere close to the amount of the loan.This is true because first, it is (1) a dealer only wholesale auction, (2) the vehicle is a "repo" and (3) the "retail" price previously paid by the purchaser/borrower is an amount greatly inflated over and above the actual "wholesale value" of the vehicle.


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