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Answered 2017-06-05 17:22:17

Over time it makes your respiratory system more efficient.

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This questions is preposterous. Without your respiratory system your muscles wouldn't get oxygen and therefore won't be able to go through cellular respiration in order to make the energy necessary to do exercise.


Oxygen and exercise do wonders for the respiratory system.


Yes. Pneumonia is a disease of the respiratory system.


Exercise has different effects on respiratory system. The moment you start exercising you may experience shortness of breath as a result of the oxygen debt created. This means that your muscles are using up more oxygen that the lungs can supply.


Because our respiratory system is part of our breathing and we all breath faster when we do exercise because the oxygen needs to get to the muscles quicker. Exercise also makes you fitter, so you will see an improvement on the respiratory system because your breathing will be more controlable... Therefore exercise defently effects the respiratory system :)


It affects the respiratory system.


It affects the respiratory system.


Arterial CO2 levels rise in people who regularly exercise. Another effect of exercise on the respiratory system is breathing is lighter and slower following exercise.


It affects the respiratory system. Not the digestive system. Your lungs are blocked by fluid.


It indirectly affects the respiratory system. Cholesterol affects the circulatory system and there is high blood pressure. Due to high blood pressure, the heart cannot pump a lot of blood to the body which indirectly affects the lungs!


respiratory system change with more exercise because it is related to our cardiovascular and respiratory system.when we do exercise our heart rate increases cardiac output increases and oxygen is more utilizing and more energy is required.These all cause effect on respiratory system



By using our respiratory system more during exercise, exercising more can make us exchange gas with more efficiency.


Your respiratory system is a system of nerves. It is a vital part of your body. Although it can have a reaction to a neurotoxin or anything that affects the body.


It affects the bronchioles, which are in the lower respiratory tract.


I've began to get your meaning. You meant not a respiratory exercise, but how exercises affects your respiratory system. But short term is not adequate on this question, because exercises, specially aerobic ones improve your respiratory system conditions not for a short term, but as long you remain doing such exercises, and the effects are almost the same as on other organs. I think this question should be done on another form.


The effect exercise has on the respiratory system is that it helps the blood to circulate in the body and so it and the circulatory system have linked together to help in the living of the human body.The respiratory system helps to get rid of unwanted substance in the body (eg.blood)


Pneumonia affects the respiratory system. It affects the alveoli of the lungs.


It affects your Respiratory System (breathing system). Especially it targets your lungs.


Arsenic affects the respiratory system in a life threatening way. It leads to metabolic interference which in turn causes multiple system organ failure, including the respiratory system.


Exercise, and deep breathing


exercise can influence the respiratory system in a positive way because exercise gets blood pumping faster and makes the heart stronger. (the heart is a muscle by the way)


The airways into and out of the lungs and the lungs themselves make up your respiratory system. This system allows the exchange of gases


The lungs are part of the respiratory system or pulmonary system.


Emphysema affects the lungs. That is the primary organ of the respiratory system.



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