answersLogoWhite
HDTV
Math and Arithmetic
Plural Nouns
The Difference Between

What is the difference between 720p and 1080i?

373839

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2010-06-29 22:11:12
2010-06-29 22:11:12

720p and 1080i are both high definition television formats and both use the same data rate. The two different resolutions were adopted into the HD specifications and any HD television can display either of them.

1080i has 1080 lines in each picture which are refreshed 25 or 30 times each second. It displays the full image in two passes called fields. The first field displays all the odd numbered lines and the next displays all the even numbered lines. The field rate is of course twice the frame rate so there are 50 or 60 fields each second. The alternating field method is known as interlacing, hence the "i" in the format.

720p has, as the number suggests, 720 lines in the picture. The "p" stands for progressive scanning and the full picture is refreshed from top to bottom 50 or 60 times each second. There are no alternating fields with progressive scanning. Although the spatial resolution is lower, the picture is updated twice as fast. Therefore, the same amount of data is used for both formats. For those who are interested, HD raw data uses 1.483 Gigabits per second, compared to SD which uses 270 Megabits per second.

720p was included to allow broadcasters the option of using higher refresh rates for content such as sports. The fast movement typically seen in sports material is better captured with the faster refresh rate as the expense of a slightly lower resolution.

All HD televisions and recorders will handle either format without any user intervention. For viewers, it is a little academic as the television will simply display the format that the broadcaster delivers.

1080p is mentioned frequently. At present, broadcasters are not offering 1080p and it is not being used for live production. Because it is a progressive scan, it uses twice the data rate of 1080i and 720p. Current live production equipment rarely supports the format and transmission channels are not given the bandwidth too properly carry the format. It is currently limited to local sources such as games consoles, Bluray players and computer displays.

123
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


720p and 1080i are both HD television formats. They use the same data rate but 720p updates the image twice as fast as the 1080i format. 1080i has twice the number of pixels in each frame, hence the same data rate. 720i is not a recognized television format.


you can't do that. 1080i games can be played with a hdmi cable or else it will be at 720p


yes the quality is quiet different 1080 is much better how ever the is litttle to no difference betwee 1080i and 720p but 1080p is the best


High definition 720p video can be viewed on a 1080i TV as they are both compatible. Higher definition 1080p is more commonly used in most newer televisions.


I have a laptop with a screen resolution of 1366x768 and i was told it was a 1080i resolution I'm not entirely sure


If the TV is 1080i, 1080p or 720p, they are HDTV.



It supports 720p, 1080i and 1080p. On my television it auto selects 720p unless I disable 720p in the PS3 display settings.



All flat panel HDTVs (i.e., plasma and LCD), as opposed to CRT tube sets, are inherently progressive in nature. For marketing reasons, however, some manufacturers promote 720p (p for progressive) HDTV as 1080i (i for interlaced), mainly to signal, I suppose, that it supports 1080i signal and to improve their sales. The so called '1080i HDTVs' take a 1080i signal and downconvert the picture to the 720p resolution. Additionally, they de-interlace the 1080i signal and display it in progressive scan mode but in 720p resolution. So, a 1080i TV set is in reality a 720p set, but many manufactures designated 720p sets as such as soon as 1080p sets came along. 1080p sets, on the other hand, take 1080i cable or satellite signal and only deinterlace it, creating a progressive scan, meaning the picture is painted from the top to the bottom line (there are 1080 such horizontal lines) in a single pass and this process happens 60 times per second (in the US). This means that same size HDTV sets designated as 720p and 1080i have identical native resolution of the display. Quality of the picture depends only in part from resolution, however, and according to some professionals the most important aspect of picture quality is contrast ratio, the second most important is color saturation, the third is color accuracy, and only the fourth is resolution.


A television that handles 1080i is a high definition model and will therefore support all high definition broadcast formats including 720p. Although 720p is a lower resolution, it is refreshed at twice the rate of 1080i so is classed as another full HD format.


Negative, no networks broadcast in 1080P yet, it does 720P and 1080i


Well, in my opinion 720p. But, technally speaking, 1080i is the better resloution. ---- The sharpness of picture will be as follows from the sharpest to the least sharp: # Watching 1080p signal on a 1080p TV set # Watching 1080i signal (e.g., on many cable programs) on a 1080p TV set # Watching 1080i signal on 1080i or 720p TV sets (see explanation below) # Watching 720p on any of the above sets All flat panel HDTVs (i.e., plasma and LCD), as opposed to CRT tube sets, are inherently progressive in nature. For marketing reasons, however, some manufacturers promote 720p (p for progressive) HDTV as 1080i (i for interlaced), mainly to signal, I suppose, that it supports 1080i signal and to improve their sales after 1080p models have appeared. The so called '1080i HDTVs' take a 1080i signal and downconvert the picture to the 720p resolution. Additionally, they de-interlace the 1080i signal and display it in progressive scan mode but in 720p resolution. However, According to a CNET reviewer, see the link below, the extra sharpness afforded by the 1080p as compared to 720p televisions is not noticeable when watching 1080i sources on 50-inch or smaller sets from the distance of at least 8 feet. Last but not least, according to some professional consultants in this area, the most important aspect of picture quality is contrast ratio, the second most important is color saturation, the third is color accuracy, and only the fourth is resolution, despite being easily the most-talked-about.


HDTV is broadcast in two formats: 720p and 1080i. When your 1080p set gets these signals it has to convert them to 1080p. With 720p it scales the image to 1080p while with 1080i it deinterlaces the image. Current TVs are very good at this and so you wind up with the full 1080 lines of resolution in the end. If your 1080p is displaying 1080i on screen, it just means that is the signal it is receiving, but it is converted to 1080p before you see it.


Most modern LCD/Plasma TV's are capable of receiving and displaying 720i, 720p, 1080i and 1080p signals. Therefore your TV, if it can receive 1080i, should be quite happy with a 1080p signal.


Yes, it will upconvert DVD media to 720p/1080i .


720p is one of the two main HD resolutions being used. The other is 1080i. The number refers to the number of lines making the picture and the letter refers to the scan type: p for progrsseive scan and i for interlaced. Effectively, 720p runs at 60Hz (USA) or 50Hz (European) and 1080i runs at 30Hz or 25Hz. Broadcasters use one or both of them for current HD broadcasts with 720p being used more for sport and 1080i for drama and features. 720p is likely to be replaced by 1080p in the future but that won't be for a number of years. 1080p currently is not handled by any of the major broadcasters for live material and equipment for 1080p is still at early stages of development. Because it uses twice the bandwith of 720p and 1080i, it requires more storage, more bandwidth on transmission chains and it will be some time before these become common. When 1080i can be handled in live production, stored economically and broadcast without sucking up numerous other channels, we can look forward to high resolution, 60Hz material which will be well placed to push 720p aside. As a very personal prediction, as broadcasters are fight now investing in 720p and 1080i broadcast chains, we should expect them to move to 1080p only when the come to upgrade to new equipment - say, 5 years onwards. Until then, 720p will be a big part of HD content.


720p, 1080i, and 1080p are three types of broadcast signals that may reach your HDTV set as an input, with 1080p being the highest quality and, as of mid 2008, only available on Blue-Ray discs and in high-end computer games. People often confuse these broadcast signals with native resolution of the TV sets. All flat panel HDTVs (i.e., plasma and LCD), as opposed to CRT tube sets, are inherently progressive in nature. For marketing reasons, however, some manufacturers promote 720p (p for progressive) HDTV as 1080i (i for interlaced), mainly to signal, I suppose, that it supports 1080i signal and to improve their sales. The so called '1080i HDTVs' take a 1080i signal and downconvert the picture to the 720p resolution. Additionally, they de-interlace the 1080i signal and display it in progressive scan mode but in 720p resolution. So, a 1080i TV set is in reality a 720p set, but many manufactures designated 720p sets as such as soon as 1080p sets came along. 1080p sets, on the other hand, take 1080i cable or satellite signal and only deinterlace it, creating a progressive scan, meaning the picture is painted from the top to the bottom line (there are 1080 such horizontal lines) in a single pass and this process happens 60 times per second (in the US). Finally, According to a CNET reviewer, see the link below, the extra sharpness afforded by the 1080p as compared to 720p televisions is not noticeable when watching 1080i sources on 50-inch or smaller sets from the distance of at least 8 feet. Last but not least, according to the Imaging Science Foundation, the most important aspect of picture quality is contrast ratio, the second most important is color saturation, the third is color accuracy, and only the fourth is resolution, despite being easily the most-talked-about.


High definition television uses one of three common formats - 720p, 1080i and 1080p. Any incoming signal will be delivered to a television in one of the three formats.720p indicates that there are 720 lines in the image. The "p" means "progressive" and a complete image is delivered 50 or 60 times each second.1080i shows that there are 1080 lines. The "i" stands for "interlaced" and the image is sent in two halves so a half image is sent 50 or 60 times each second but the full frame is sent only 25 or 30 times each second.1080p is also made up with 1080 lines but the "p" shows that a full image is delivered 50 or 60 times each second.Broadcasters use 720p or 1080i. These are both full HD signals. Although the 720 line image has a lower resolution, it is updated twice as fast. The data rate for 720p and 1080i is the same. Although 720p is less common than 1080i, it is used by broadcasters for some fast action content such as sports.1080p updates the image at twice the rate of 1080 and therefore uses double the bandwidth. Broadcasters do not send out 1080p and it is restricted to local sources such as Bluray, games consoles etc.


Ps3 can output basically anything your TV can handle. What it comes down to is what the specific game can output, look at the back of the gamecase, it should say 720p, 1080i etc


Both 1080 line and 720 line picture formats are HD signals. 720p is a lower spatial resolution but a higher temporal resolution than 1080i broadcast signal. That means that the 1080 line image is refreshed at half the rate of the 720p signal.720p is regarded as a better format for high speed movement, hence it has some popularity for some sports broadcasts although 1080i is by far the more common format for broadcast television.Note that 1080p is not a format that is being broadcast at present and for the time being it is limited to local sources such as Bluray players and games consoles.


High definition television uses one of three common formats - 720p, 1080i and 1080p.720p indicates that there are 720 lines in the image. The "p" means "progressive" and a complete image is delivered 50 or 60 times each second.1080i shows that there are 1080 lines. The "i" stands for "interlaced" and the image is sent in two halves so a half image is sent 50 or 60 times each second but the full frame is sent only 25 or 30 times each second.1080p is also made up with 1080 lines but the "p" shows that a full image is delivered 50 or 60 times each second.Broadcasters use 720p or 1080i. These are both full HD signals. Although the 720 line image has a lower resolution, it is updated twice as fast. The data rate for 720p and 1080i is the same. Although 720p is less common than 1080i, it is used by broadcasters for some fast action content such as sports.1080p updates the image at twice the rate of 1080 and therefore uses double the bandwidth. Broadcasters do not send out 1080p and it is restricted to local sources such as Bluray, games consoles etc.


HD televisions are capable to displaying several HD formats. The most common are 1080i, 1080p and 720p. All HD signals will be in one of those three formats and the television will automatically accept and display any of the formats. The on screen report that the display is running at 720p is simply an indication that the incoming signal is in that format. Change the incoming signal to 1080 and the status will change to show 1080. Note that 1080i and 720p are both true HD formats and broadcasters are free to use either format. 720p is less used but it may be found on sports channels as it handles high speed movement a little better than 1080i.


No, only 1080i. 1080p is currently only found on local video sources such as games consoles and computer displays. Broadcasters are currently using only 1080i and 720p as their HD formats.


Yes, the larger the television size, the more noticeable the difference in pixalation.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.