Alexander the Great

One of the most successful commanders of all time, Alexander the Great (356–323 BC) was the king of Macedonia and the creator of the largest empire in ancient history, from the Ionian Sea to the Himalayas.

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What were the bad deeds Alexander the Great did?

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Alexander was raised to hero status and the surviving records gloss over most of his discreditable actions. We do know that he murdered one of his close associates and had another of his generals executed, and that he wantonly destroyed Persepolis. Then it is a matter of whether you consider waging massive war for a decade with enormous military and civilian casualties is good or bad, necessary or not, heroic or worthy of censure.
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How did Alexander the Great become so famous?

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by killing almost everyone that stands in his way Setting out from Macedonia, Alexander conquered Asia Minor, the Near East, Egypt, the Middle East, Persia, parts of Afghanistan, and parts of India. He did so almost completely with a comparatively small, well-trained and equipped, highly mobile force, led by his cavalry.
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Where did Alexander the great study?

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He was taught by the famous philosopher Aristotle.
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Why was Alexander the great trained to be a leader?

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because his father was a good leader ~I LUV MY H@TERZ~
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Did Alexander The Great invade England?

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No, he went East with his Empire
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What was Alexander The Great rank in battle?

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Upon the death of his father, King Philip of Macedonia, Alexander the Great rose to the throne as Alexander III, king of Macedonia. On his famous march across the world, he raised up a army of about 32,000 soldiers and set of to fulfill his dream of conquering the world. In this magnificent military campaign, Alexander rode at the head of the army, as the king of his army. Although he was the king, the soldiers thought of him as simply a fellow soldier. He wasn't the type of king that sat on a hill ordering his soldiers around in the battlefield before him; instead he was always in the thick of it all, fighting courageously against all odds. For this reason, even though Alexander was king, he was more like a brother to those that served under him.
Asked in Alexander the Great, Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages

When did Alexander Borodin die?

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Alexander Borodin died on February 27, 1887 at the age of 53.
Asked in Ancient History, Ancient Greece, Alexander the Great

How did the ancient Greeks spread their culture?

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Initially, they did so minimally through trade, especially with Crete. More influential was the expansion of the Greek/Macedonia empire through Alexander the Great. There are a number of reasons as to why Greek culture took so well abroad after being conquered by Alexander. 1) Religion. The conquered people simply adopted Greek gods because these gods were as superior to their own. In their eyes, the gods of Greeks beat their own gods and let the Greeks conquer them. Thus, it stands that the Greek gods are stronger. Once they adopted the religion of the Greeks, the rest of the culture soon followed. 2) Alexander's army was vast and multiethnic. He took in new soldiers as he left old ones behind to rule his conquered cities. The Greeks left behind became the new elite. The conquered elite, finding themselves not on top of the food chain any longer, then adopted the new elite's culture in order to curry favor. 3) It was cool. Alexander's young, hip, and the greatest general around. He's doing something right. Better adopt elements of his culture in order to be one of the cool kids too. 4) Adaptation. In all seriousness, Alexander takes his armies, conquers cities, plants Greek soldiers there, drafts soldiers from newly conquered territories into his Greek armies, rinses and repeats. People were introduced to Greek culture, became used to it, and began to adopt elements of it into their own. Hence, Greek culture was spread everywhere Alexander went.
Asked in Roman Empire, Alexander the Great

Why did Alexander stop expanding his kingdom?

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His men were threatening to mutiny because they wanted to go home.
Asked in Ancient Greece, Alexander the Great

How far did Alexander the great empire stretch?

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From Hellas and Egypt in the west, to beyond the Indus river. From the northern stretches of the Arabian peninsula, to the Kaukasus mountains and Bactria.
Asked in The Bible, Alexander the Great

Is Hellenistic in The Bible?

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Not as a term, the ending -"istic" is Latin aftr all, and the world Hellenistic is Frenach and German, but the Christian bible was written in the Hellenic dialect of the Hellenistic age: Koine Greek (Hellenic means Greek, in Greek: Hellenica). Koine (also spelled Coene) was the international language of the Hellenistic era. christ, and St Paul therefore do not speak of "Hellenists" but of "Hellenes" - Greeks. In the same way there are no "Americanists" today, just simply "Americans".
Asked in Alexander the Great, Cleopatra

Is it true that Cleopatra's family was related to Alexander the great?

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The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals. The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals. The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals. The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals. The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals. The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals. The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals. The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals. The answer to your question is one of those maybe yes, maybe no things. Cleopatra's ancestor who founded her dynasty, was Ptolemy Sotor and some authorities say he was a cousin or a second cousin of Alexander the Great. Other authorities simply say he was just one of Alexander's generals.
Asked in Alexander the Great

Why did Alexander's empire not continue to grow?

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It is one thing to conquer and empire but another thing to sustain one. Alexander's empire stopped expanding because when, after a lot of hardships, his army reached the western edges of India, the men refused to continue eastwards. They were tired of conquest and wanted to get home. They returned to Persia (after a terrible forced march through the desert, where many died) which was intended to be the centre of his Empire. On the way there, Alexander's lover Hephastion died, possibly poisoned, possibly from poor medical care after a bout of dysentery. The loss seems to have driven Alexander partly insane - at one point he seems to have tried to starve himself to death. He recovered, and devised an immense state funeral for Hephastion, but was never the same again. Although he was still young he had also received terrible injuries during the various battles he fought on his journey eastwards - including one where an arrow pierced his lung, shattering the rib and permanently damaging his breathing. He had recovered and continued to lead his army from the front, but it was taking its toll too. When Alexander reached Babylon he caught a fever, possibly due to bad water, refused treatment, stayed up late drinking with his men (a Macedonian custom) and developed an infection from which he soon died. Overwork, grief and much damage to his body probably played its part. He had no child and no obvious successor. His lesser wife (the daughter of of Sogdian king) was certainly pregnant, and gave birth to his son some months later. His chief wife (the daughter of the last Persian emperor Darius) may have been pregnant, too, but she was quickly murdered. His half-brother, Philip, was thought to be an idiot: he was there with the army but never considered as a serious successor. If Hephastion had survived, he (as second-in-command) would probably have had a good chance of taking over, but he was dead. Without the dynamic, charismatic leader, the Empire he had only just put together collapsed. Each of his generals grabbed what he could, and they all fought each other. One of them kidnapped Alexander's surviving wife and his son, and later had them murdered. The Hellenistic empire became a number of different, often warring, empires, each of them ruled by a Greek-speaking dynasty descended from one or other Macedonian war leader. The most successful was Ptolomy, who grabbed Egypt - and kept it. His line lasted until the rise of the Roman Empire. Cleopatra was a descendant of his.
Asked in Monarchy, Alexander the Great

How did king Alexander III die?

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He was riding a horse on a stormy night, in Edinburgh. He was safely crossing the river without his guard and the horse got spooked by a strike of lightening, and threw him off, and down a cliff.
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Was Alexander the Great a hero or villain?

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He was like a forest fire destroying some people but also bring Greek life to the known world.
Asked in Alexander the Great, Iran

What first victories against the Persians gave him control of which region?

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He first defeated a Persian provincial force a Granicus in Asia Minor. He then defeated Persian king Darius at Issus in Syria. He then took the Levant and captured Tyre after a siege, then Egypt. This gave him control of the Mediterranean coast, which ended the maritime threat of the Persians to Macedonia and Greece, the source of his troops and reinforcements.
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Who was Alexander the Great?

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Alexander the Great (356 BC to 323 BC) was the King of Macedonia. He conquered most of the known world through vigorous military campaigns. He was never defeated in battle. He was born in Paella, Macedonia, in July 356 BC. His educator was the great Greek philosopher Aristotle. His dream was to unite nations and cultures and to spread the Greek Ideal to the known world of that era. Some of his victorious battles were : Granikos, Issos, Gavgamila, Ydaspes, Sousa. After defeating the Persians, Alexander went to conquer India. He defeated King Porus in the battle of Hydaspyes. But after that he lost a lot of men and his army was so exhausted, Alexander had to turn back to Babylon. Before his death he had established plans to extend his rule into Arabia, Rome and Spain (the Iberian Peninsula). His ultimate goal was to reach the Pacific by conquering China. His empire extended as far as Punjab, India. Alexander established many new cities that still carry his name: Alexandria or Alexandroupoli. He died in Babylon in 323 BC at the age of 33.
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How might European history have been different if Alexander had not died so young?

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yes, it would have, because he was very powerful and determined, he may of conquered the rest of Europe!
Asked in Alexander the Great, Heracles (Hercules)

Was Alexander the great Hercules son?

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No, he was not. Alexander the Great was the son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias, a princess of the ancient Greek country of Epirus. It was claimed by ancient historians that Hercules was an ancestor of Alexander's through his father's side, and during his reign Alexander did identify himself with Hercules, often depicting himself as the Greek hero on coins.
Asked in Founding Fathers, Alexander the Great

Why was Alexander the Great important?

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Alexander the Great is important because by the age of thirty he had created one of the largest empires in ancient history. He was the ancient ruler of Macedonia, what is now north eastern Greece and as ruler he conquered most of the civilized world, from Greece to Egypt, Persia and India. He is known as one of the greatest commanders of all time and was undefeated in battle.
Asked in Ancient Greece, Aristotle, Alexander the Great

Why did Aristotle want Alexander to invade Persia?

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Because Aristotle was a Greek, an Athenian in fact, and like most Greeks hated Persians because of their invasion during the Persian War the previous generation had fought which left much of the Greeks treasures and valued buildings destroyed. Athens was sacked and its citizens bitter. Revenge for this was the official reason Alexander gave for his invasion of Persia that sparked his massive campaign.
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How many cities did Alexander build?

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He built over 70, many of which he modestly named after himself. The most significant is today's Alexandria, but this is not the one he built, which became submerged by a sea rise nearly a couple of millennia ago.

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