Birth Control

This in an umbrella term for various methods and techniques use to prevent fertilization or interrupt pregnancy at several stages. Some of the commonly used birth control methods are condoms, contraceptive pills and injectable contraceptives.

9,370 Questions
Birth Control
Birth Control Pill

How effective is the birth control pill?

No form of contraception, except total abstinence, is 100% effective. If 1000 couples take the birth control pill perfectly, 3 couples will have a pregnancy over the course of the year.

In real life, the failure rate is about 3/100 because of user error. Among teens, about 1/8 will have a pregnancy. Missing or forgetting pills is the most common reason that the birth control pill fails.

Other reasons are interfering medications or herbal preparations.

Talk with your partner about how it would be for you if you had a pregnancy now. If an unintended pregnancy would be a disaster, consider using condoms along with the birth control pill or consider switching to a method with top-tier effectiveness such as the IUD or contraceptive implant.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill

Are you protected while taking the sugar pills in your birth control?

When you are on the sugar pills, you have the same protection as on the earlier active pills as long as you took the previous weeks of pills as directed. This protection is in place whether you are having withdrawal bleeding that day or not. Using a condom further lowers the risk of pregnancy, and provides protection against disease. The sugar pills are there to make sure you maintain a routine with the taking of the pill.

There is always a chance of pregnancy while using birth control. If you are really afraid of pregnancy you should use two methods (like the pill and a condom, or the pill and a spermicide etc.) Among 1000 couples using the birth control pill perfectly for a year, three couples will get pregnant. When you consider that perfect use is challenging, then it's worth looking at "typical use" failure rates: of 1000 couples using the birth control pill "typically" (with mistakes) during a year, 30 will have a pregnancy. Using a condom each time you have sex lowers the rate of pregnancy significantly.

Some birth control brands contain iron or other vitamins in the placebo pills. Whether your placebos contain iron or not, you have protection from pregnancy during the placebo period as long as you took the previous weeks of pills correctly.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill
Ovulation

What if you miss a birth control pill?

If you take your pills each day, your odds of pregnancy are low. Of 1000 couples using the pill for birth control for a year, three couples will have a pregnancy. However, most people aren't perfect; of 1000 couples using the pill typically for a year, 30 will get pregnant.

After missing a pill, some women will have breakthrough bleeding. Even if you have bleeding or spotting, continue to take the pill as scheduled. Stopping it will only prolong the bleeding and increase your risk of pregnancy. Also, your next withdrawal bleed may be a little late or different.

If you forget a pill, follow the instructions below. This is the most current information, found at the "related link": If you're on a combination pill with 30 or 35 mcg of estrogen

  • If you missed one or two pills or started the new pack one or two days late, there is no reason to use the morning after pill, and you don't need additional protection against pregnancy.

If you're on a combination pill with 20 mcg of estrogen or less

  • If you missed one pill or started the new pack one day late, there is no reason to use the morning after pill, and you don't need additional protection against pregnancy.

If you're on the progesterone-only pill

  • Consider using the morning after pill if you're late with your pill by more than three hours. Use a backup method until you've taken two pills in two days (after levonorgestrel) or 14 pills in 14 days (if you took ulipristal for emergency contraception).

If missing a birth control pill is a frequent problem for you, or if preventing pregnancy is very important to you, consider changing to one of the highly effective methods, like the IUD or the implant, rather than the mid-level pill.

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Birth Control

When can you get pregnant after stopping birth control?

With almost every method, you'll ovulate 2-4 weeks after stopping birth control and can get pregnant at that time. There is no medical need to wait before trying to conceive.

One exception is Depo Provera. Some women get pregnant right after they miss a shot; others won't have their period return for 18 months. The average is 11 months.

Also, with Paragard, you ovulate every month while using it, so you can get pregnant immediately after stopping if you're at the right time in your cycle.

There are many methods to check if you are ovulating, including ovulation kits (from pharmacy) and temperature methods (your temperature rises slightly on the day you are ovulating).

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Birth Control

When does birth control become effective?

Here is information on various methods of birth control and when they become effective. Of course, using a back up method like condoms helps to further reduce the risk of pregnancy, as well as reducing the risk of infection.

You can confirm this information by checking the FDA insert that came with your method, or the prescribers' information regulated by the FDA. These are evidence-based guidelines that are the standard of care in the US.

If you have trouble using the method as prescribed (e.g. forgetting pills, taking out the NuvaRing mid cycle), you may need to use backup for much longer, as you increase the risk of pregnancy by not using the method correctly.

Here are the guidelines used by professionals in family planning. These represent the standards of care in use in the US at this time. This material is not copyrighted nor copied from another website, but can be confirmed by consulting Contraceptive Technology, FDA inserts for the various methods, or other high-quality gynecology references.

Combination Birth Control Pill, Patch, Ring, Contraceptive Implant (Nexplanon) If started within the first five days of menstrual bleeding, no back up method is needed - it's immediately effective. If started at any other time in the menstrual cycle, use a back up method for seven days. If you're switching from the shot, implant, or another birth control pill, and you're not late in starting the new method, no backup is needed. If you're starting within five days of an in-clinic suction abortion, no backup is needed. If you're starting within seven days of mifepristone for medication abortion, no backup is needed. If you've taken ullipristal (ella) for emergency contraception, use backup for fourteen days.

Progestin-Only Birth Control Pill (Minipill) If started within the first five days of menstrual bleeding, no back up method is needed - it's immediately effective. If started at any other time in the menstrual cycle, use a back up method for two days. If you're switching from the shot, implant, or another birth control pill, and you're not late in starting the new method, no backup is needed. If you're starting within five days of an in-clinic suction abortion, no backup is needed. If you're starting within seven days of mifepristone for medication abortion, no backup is needed. If you've taken ullipristal (ella) for emergency contraception, use backup for fourteen days.

Depo Provera If started within the first seven days of menstrual bleeding, no back up method is needed - it's immediately effective. If started at any other time in the menstrual cycle, use a back up method for seven days. If you're switching from the shot, implant, or another birth control pill, and you're not late in starting the new method, no backup is needed. If you're starting within five days of an in-clinic suction abortion, no backup is needed. If you're starting within seven days of mifepristone for medication abortion, no backup is needed. If you're starting within 21 days of a delivery of a baby, no backup is needed.

Mirena IUD If started within the first seven days of menstrual bleeding, no back up method is needed - it's immediately effective. If started at any other time in the menstrual cycle, use a back up method for seven days. If you're switching from the shot, implant, or a birth control pill, continue the hormonal birth control method for seven days if you're not in the first five days of menstrual bleeding. If you're starting on the day of an in-clinic suction abortion, no backup is needed. If you've taken ullipristal (ella) for emergency contraception, use backup for fourteen days.

Paragard copper IUD If started within the first twelve days of menstrual bleeding, no back up method is needed - it's immediately effective. If started at any other time in the menstrual cycle, use a back up method for seven days. If you're switching from the shot, implant, or a birth control pill, continue the hormonal birth control method for seven days if you're not in the first five days of menstrual bleeding. If you're starting on the day of an in-clinic suction abortion, no backup is needed.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill

Can you be pregnant but still have your period if you're on birth control?

If a woman has a period, it is unlikely that she is pregnant; however, birth control is not 100% effective. The bleeding you have while on birth control is not actually a period; it is withdrawal bleeding, a reaction to lower hormones in the days you use a placebo pill.

If you're having a typical withdrawal bleed, chances are low that you are pregnant. If you're pregnant, you will not have a normal withdrawal bleed. However you may experience brown vaginal bleeding or no bleeding at all.

Even without the birth control pill, some pregnant women have bleeding (similar, but not equal, to a period) in the first month. This spotting is common, and doesn't mean that something is wrong with the pregnancy. But if you're having bleeding or spotting with a positive pregnancy test, contact your health care provider today. If you're having pain, bleeding, and a positive pregnancy test, go to the emergency room.

Pregnancy with bleeding while on birth control is possible. First, birth control pills are not 100% effective and it is possible to become pregnant while on them. Second, bleeding during pregnancy is possible, but usually signals a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill
Drug Interactions
Antibiotics

Do antibiotics affect the birth control pill?

Study after study shows that there are no clinically significant drug interactions* between the vast majority of antibiotics and the birth control pill. Anecdotal evidence from health care providers has led some to recommend using a backup method of birth control for a week after using antibiotics. Long-term use (as for acne) does not increase the risk of pregnancy. There are a few antibiotics, such as rifampin and griseofulvin and some HIV medications, that do interact. The safest approach is to check with your health care provider or pharmacist for advice specific to your situation.

*While some antibiotics may slightly change the absorption of estrogen in the gut, these changes are not enough to change how well the birth control pill works, with the exceptions noted above.

Taken from the newsletter: "Pharmacist's Letter" November 11, 2002

TRUTH:

Women have been warned for decades to use backup contraception when taking oral contraceptives and antibiotics together.

This all started back in the '70s when a few women on oral contraceptives took rifampin and then got pregnant.

Additional anecdotal reports started popping up, suggesting that other antibiotics might be related to unwanted pregnancies in women taking oral contraceptives.

One theory was that antibiotics killed gut bacteria, which are involved in estrogen absorption.

Researchers later discovered that rifampin and griseofulvin actually increase the metabolism of oral contraceptives, making them less effective.

But the evidence for other antibiotics is shaky.

In fact, oral contraceptive levels are not DECREASED by most antibiotics...tetracycline, doxycycline, ampicillin, quinolones, and metronidazole.

Oral contraceptive levels are actually INCREASED by some antibiotics...erythromycin...clarithromycin...and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

There's growing evidence that most women taking antibiotics with oral contraceptives do NOT have an increased risk of getting pregnant.

But most package inserts still warn that another form of contraception is needed when starting antibiotics.

Explain to women taking oral contraceptives that there can be up to a 3% failure rate, regardless of antibiotic use.

A small number of women might be predisposed to a higher failure rate due to genetic metabolic variations...but it's difficult to determine who these women are.

To be on the safe side, tell women to continue using backup contraception during the entire course of antibiotics and for 7 days after.

Explain that sickness or antibiotic side effects such as diarrhea or vomiting can increase oral contraceptive failure.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Patch

When does the birth control patch become effective?

If you start the birth control patch during the first 24 hours of your period, you have immediate protection. If you start the first patch at any other time, you should use a backup method, like condoms or abstinence from vaginal sex, until you've worn the patch for seven days.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill

How effective is birth control?

Different methods have different levels of effectiveness. Some methods, like the condom or pill, depend on how well you use them, while others, like the IUD or implant, don't require the user to do anything special to make them effective. Effectiveness of birth control is reported as the number of pregnancies in 100 couples using the method for a year. Each method has two numbers reported -- one that reflects perfect use, and the other that reflects real-life use (because nobody's perfect.)

The top-tier reliable and reversible methods are the IUD and the contraceptive implant. There is nothing you have to do to make these methods effective, so the perfect use and real-life use numbers are the same. Fewer than one in a hundred couples using this method get pregnant each year. The next tier are the hormonal methods that depend on the couple to do something daily, weekly, or monthly to make them work. Used perfectly, the methods result in fewer than one in one hundred patients getting pregnant over the course of the year. However, many couples find it difficult to use these methods consistently and correctly.

With the birth control shot, Depo Provera, many couples miss the appointment for reinjection. For that reason, the real-life effectiveness is much lower, and about six in one hundred couples get pregnant every year while using the injection.

The birth control ring, NuvaRing, has to be changed out once a month. The patch has to be changed weekly. The pill must be taken daily. These have an error rate high enough that nine in one hundred couples using it get pregnant every year.

Condoms are easy to use in conjunction with another method, like the pill or the ring. One of their advantages is that the male partner can ensure that he is protected against fatherhood by using them correctly and consistently. If 100 couples use condoms perfectly over the course of the year, two couples may have a pregnancy. Since so many couples using condoms don't use them every time they have sex, 18 in 100 couples using condoms for birth control get pregnant over the course of the year. That's almost one in five! Withdrawal or pulling out is another method that men can control. Of 100 couples using withdrawal over the course of the year, 27 will have a pregnancy. It's better than doing nothing at all, but the chances of it failing are high.

Because effectiveness rates vary so much, and depend on how committed and able the partners are to using the methods, it's important that you talk with your partner about how important it is to you to avoid pregnancy right now. What would it be like if you got pregnant this year? What kind of assurance do you need that a pregnancy won't happen? Considering those questions, and your ability to use each method correctly, can help you determine what level of protection you need.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill

What if you miss two birth control pills?

If you take your pills each day, your odds of pregnancy are low. Of 1000 couples using the pill for birth control for a year, three couples will have a pregnancy. However, most people aren't perfect; of 1000 couples using the pill typically for a year, 30 will get pregnant.

After missing a pill, some women will have breakthrough bleeding. Even if you have bleeding or spotting, continue to take the pill as scheduled. Stopping it will only prolong the bleeding and increase your risk of pregnancy. Your next withdrawal bleed may be late or different.

If you forget your pills for two days, follow the instructions below. This is the most current information, found at the "related link":

If you're on a combination pill with 30 or 35 mcg of estrogen:

  • If you missed one or two pills or started the new pack one or two days late, there is no reason to use the morning after pill, and you don't need additional protection against pregnancy.

If you're on a combination pill with 20 mcg of estrogen or less

  • If you missed two or more active pills, or started the pack two days late, or had sex before you had taken seven pills during your very first pack, be sure to take additional steps to prevent pregnancy. Use the morning after pill if you already had sex. Use condoms or abstain from vaginal sex until you've taken the pill correctly for seven days in a row (if you took levnorgestrel emergency contraception) or fourteen days in a row (if you took ulipristal). If you're in the last week (days 15-21) of active pills, don't skip a week (Days 22-28 or use inactive pills), go straight to the new pill packet - again 7 pills in 7 days after levonorgestrel, or 14 pills in 14 days after ullipristal.

If you're on the progesterone-only pill

  • Consider using the morning after pill if you're late with your pill by more than three hours. Use a backup method until you've taken two pills in two days (after levonorgestrel) or 14 pills in 14 days (if you took ullipristal for emergency contraception).

If missed pills are a recurring problem for you, or if it is very important for you to prevent pregnancy, consider changing to one of the highly-effective methods like the implant or IUD, rather than using the mid-level birth control pill.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill

Can you start the birth control pill before your next period starts?

You can start the birth control pill at any time in your cycle. The quick start approach is the current standard of care. Studies show that starting the pill as soon as you get it decreases the risk of pregnancy and increases the risk of continuing the pill.

If you're starting the birth control pill in the first five days of menstrual bleeding, you have immediate protection. If you're starting at any other time in your cycle, use a back up method of birth control, like condoms or abstinence from vaginal sex, for the first seven days of the first cycle.

Regardless of the birth control pill you are taking, per FDA guidelines and standard GYN practice:

  • If you start the pill in the first five days of menstrual bleeding, no backup method is needed.
  • If you start the pill at any other time in your cycle, use a backup method of birth control, like condoms or abstinence from vaginal sex, for the first seven days of that first pack.

You can confirm this information by checking the FDA insert that came with your birth control pill, or by calling your prescriber or pharmacist.

For reasons of patient error, some health care providers recommend that new users, particularly teens, use a back up method for a month because of the increased possibility of missing a pill, not because the pills, when taken as directed, take that long to start to work.
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Birth Control
Medication and Drugs
Painkillers

Do painkillers affect birth control?

The group of medications that can be called "painkillers" is too broad to make a blanket statement about how they affect other medications. Tylenol, ibuprofen and other NSAIDs, hydrocodone, Percocet, and triptans like Imitrex for migraine do not affect hormonal birth control. If you are taking other painkillers, contact your health care provider or pharmacist for information specific to your situation.

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Birth Control

Can you remove your own IUD?

You could seriously hurt yourself. Have your ob/gyn do it.

to all the girls out there that are having isuess with you IUD like i was. You can remove it at home. This is how i did it.. I layed down on the bathroom floor had my boyfriend use his middle and index fingers to locate the strings. Gently pull on the strings ( it may take awhile for him to get ahold of them or with a couple of tries.) but then he finally felt the tip of it grab ahold of it and slowly pulled. The next thing i knew it was out. Afterward i had a little cramping and i little lite spotting but trust me it was worth it. I was worried and scared but just relax and breath and trust me it will be just fine.

I wouldn't try it, I have been told(I also have one) that it does hurt when removed because the "wings" have opened inside. So it would be like pulling it out and they must go up, so to speak. It is hard you must also find the string to pull.

Yes you can! I removed mine just Friday (and started my normal period on Sunday). It didn't hurt like it did having it put in, however, it was uncomfortable, and you do have to be careful trying to pull it down. It is hard to grasp, but certainly not impossible. I was tired of all the side effects, so I removed mine on my own.

Yes, my husband tried to remove it but the string is very slipperly but at second time he got the string and pulled it very very slowly. It came out perfectly. After it was removed, I got more orgasm.

I will say that I took mine out on my own as well, i pulled upward and VERY slowly on mine and it came out with no issues... Otherwise I would have had to wait a month or more on my MD and time is obviously of the essence when you are trying to plan a pregnancy. I don't recommend this for everyone, but i also had an OB nurse, who is my friend, talk me through it on the phone. Just use lots of care if you decide to do this on your own. Oh and btw, you only pass through the cervix.... not the uterus. The cervix is the opening of the uterus, come on people get your basic anatomy correct!

yes, thank you for the help. my obgyn was going to charge $175 to remove my minera IUD and i don't have insurance. I read up online. The danger seems to be if it's not in the right place. Since I'd just been to see the obgyn and she'd said it was in place, i felt safe attempting to remove it. My boyfriend is better at finding the strings (usually with an "ouch!" when we're intimate. the things they don't tell you...) First we tried him getting the strings. I think he relaxed me with his fingers and he found the strings. he showed me where they were. I put my finger behind them and then pushed with my muscles to make them come forward. this worked really well. i was able to grasp them between my fingers. then i just relaxed and breathed and pulled gently and very slowly. i thought about pushing more but we decided that with the wings, i was better to stay relaxed. he lay down next to me and i continued to pull gently. it didn't hurt at all. it probably didn't take long but i wasn't hurrying. there was a pop-release and walla. there it was. it was gooey. i think my body was protecting itself. i was very surprised that it was so easy and didn't hurt.

I pulled out my own IUD. I got criticism for doing so, but i really didnt know what the harm was, as long as when you pull it out you dont feel resistence. My strings were on the longer size and i had my husband just pull on them gently and it came out with no force. I haven't had any problems from doing so.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill
Menstruation

Can the birth control pill cause a missed period?

You usually get your period when you start taking the sugar pills, but you can miss your period on the birth control pills for a number of reasons:

  • Bleeding is supposed to be lighter when you are on the pill and last for a shorter period of time. Sometimes bleeding can be so light that it's absent or unnoticable. Some women find this helpful, and others find it disturbing. It is not dangerous, but if you find it stressful, talk with your health care provider about a possible pill change.
  • Some birth control makes you have your period 3 or 4 times a year. If you don't know, do some research about your birth control or ask your health care provider.
  • Not getting your period could obviously mean pregnancy. If you've missed pills, or if you have symptoms of pregnancy, take a home pregnancy test.
  • If you threw away the placebo pills (sugar pills) and started your next pack immediately, skipping your periods is normal.
  • If you're on the progesterone-only pill (e.g. Micronor or Nora-B), not having withdrawal bleeding is normal.
  • There's no danger in starting the pill for the first time in between period, but it might increase the risk of having no withdrawal bleeding at the end of the first pack.
  • If you missed a pill or two and then doubled up, you can have a late or missed period, even though you did the right thing.

To be accurate, you do not have periods while using combined birth control pills; instead, you have a withdrawal bleed because you're no longer putting the hormones in your body.
It shouldn't it should just regulate it.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill
Birth Control Patch

When do you get your period after stopping birth control?

I have only been on birth control for a month (Ocella), it made me nausea and tired all the time. also very bad mood swings. While on the pill I had my period for 26/28 days. Since stopping the pill, however, I have yet to actually get my period back. I have read that it can take 1-3 months after stopping the pill to start ovulating and getting your period back to normal. Does this still happen for people who have only taken the pill for 1 month? I am only a week late than I usually am. My face has broken out, I have lower back pain, and breast tenderness, all my normal menstrual symptoms, just without the period!
i was on the pill for 4 yrs, as soon as i stopped taking the pill i had a period.i have had regular and on time periods since. But i do think it varies with each individual. Hope this helps
I was on Depo-Provera for 9 months. It's been 3 months since I stopped using it for birth control and I haven't gotten a period yet.

Not having to worry about taking birth control daily did not make up for the side-effects I endured (thinning hair and a 70-pound weight gain). My doctor has told me that it could take up to a year to get a normal period.
It can take anywhere from a few days to a week or more. If it takes too long to arrive, you may want to talk to your gynecologist.
After you stop the pill, patch, or ring, you typically have some withdrawal bleeding. If you don't start the next pack, your body will get ready to ovulate again. If your periods were regular before using the pill, patch, or ring, you will probably get a period 4-6 weeks after your withdrawal bleeding. If they were irregular before using hormonal birth control, you'll probably go back being irregular.
Not necessarily. You may start your period early or spot. However, you should start your period at the usual time with no problems. If there are any problems, call your doctor.
Yes you may get longer, heavier periods. Until your body gets back to it's usual function minus the birth control there is a good chance your period will be effected.
if you have been on birth control for years then it can take 3-6 months to straighten out good luck
It can take anything from 4 weeks to a year for birth control toleave your body it depends on your system

Answer

I have been taking the pill for over 10 years, and stopped taking just over 10 weeks ago. I still havent got my first normal period! and have taken 3 preg tests so it cant be that! we are being careful anyway. does anyone know how long is normal until you get your first normal period after stopping the pill? Thanks.

Answer

I stopped taking the pill and my period didn't come back straight away either. I googled it and heard anything up to 3 months was normal, so I waited 3 months before going to my doctor. At 3 months, my doctor did some hormone blood tests (they came back showing my hormone levels were normal, but if they were abnormal she would have prescribed medication) and told me that everyone is different. Some girls get their period the very next day, most get it within 3 months, but its still normal to have to wait up to 12 months. She told me to come back at the 6 month mark for more blood tests if I still hadn't gotten my period.

6 months to the day, I got my period. Glad that's over and done with!

If you haven't already done so, you should go to your doctor for a checkup and blood tests, but also know that it is within normal boundaries until you hit the 12 month mark.

Answer

Within a month.

Answer

Every one is different but for me, I just got off birth control - i only took it for 4 days because it made me so sick -and what do u know --2 days later I'm on my period again and it's so weird cause i just got off my period 2 weeks ago.

Answer

I was taking birth control for years. I stopped taking them second week on a Saturday and It came exactly one week later.When I was suppose to get it.

Answer

I have been on BCP for 8 years and stopping taking it in January about 11 months ago. I had irregular periods for about 8 months but havn't gotten my period since August, 3 months. I too have taken pregnancy tests and all are negative and always use condoms with my boyfriend. I'm getting a little nervous about going 3 months but sinc eyou posted 12 months can happen I am set at ease a little.
I stopped taking cerazette 10 weeks ago and I still haven't had a period. I spoke to my doctor and she said it can vary from person to person and can take anything from 3 months to a year to return!

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill
Medication and Drugs
Antibiotics

Does Amoxicillin affect the Birth Control Pill?

Amoxicillin and other antibiotics can make the BCPs less effective. Most suggest a barrier method like condoms.

Because our bodies are all so different there is no real way to measure this. What is enough to cause one woman to get pregnant may not have an effect on another.

Microorganisms in your gut can alter the drug, it gets sent back to the liver, which changes it back, and the cycle starts over meanwhile the drug is effective. If you take antibiotics you have the potential of killing those little helpful organisms, and enhance the clearance of the drug from the body.

There is insufficient evidence to say that amoxicillin negatively affects your birth control pills. The topic is debatable (though most experts believe that it does not) so most doctors err on the side of caution and instruct their patients to use other means of contraception.

In simple English there is no evidence that amoxicillin, tetracycline, penicillin or other broad spectrum antibiotics decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. There are a few drugs that can have a marked effect on contraceptives so always ask your doctor or pharmacist when you begin taking a new prescription along with contraceptives.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill

Does the birth control pill affect future fertility?

There is no increased rate of miscarriage or birth defects, and no decrease in fertility, in women who have taken the birth control pill in the past or who conceive while on the birth control pill. Of 100 couples using no birth control for a year, 85 will get pregnant; this number is the same for couples who used the pill in the past and for couples who did not.

Your periods are likely to return to their previous irregular pattern after stopping the pill - it doesn't cure any problem. Remember that the most important thing you can do to protect your fertility is to use protection against sexually transmissible infections.
In nearly all cases, fertility will return within a few weeks of not taking the pill. You ask if there's any chance? Of course there's a chance, but it's very negligible.

AnswerIt shouldn't. The problem is that if you started before you have ever been pregnant it may be that you were unable to conceive anyway.

I took the pill from age 19 to 30, stopped in August of one year, used condoms for 4 months and got pregnant the very first month we made love without contraception.
It will not effect your chances of conceiving at all because BCP will be 100%, completely out of your system 3months after stopping BCP.

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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill

Does doxycycline affect the birth control pill?

According to the WebMD site, it can make BCP less effective, ask your doctor if you need to use a back-up BC method while taking it.

Some brands of doxycycline should not be taken with milk, because milk interferes with the absorption of the antibiotic. You can ask your pharmacist for a brand that can be taken with milk if this is a concern.

This drug also makes you more susceptible to sunburn, be sure to use a sunscreen or avoid exposure.

Do not take iron supplements, multivitamins, calcium supplements, antacids, or laxatives within 2 hours before or after taking doxycycline.

Yes !!!!!! Use another form of birth control for at least a month after you are done. Ask a pharmacist.


You should continue to use additional back-up contraception until the end of your current cycle. When you start a new pack of birth control pills you should be safe.
It has been shown in some cases to interact. See related links for more information.
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Birth Control
Birth Control Pill
Birth Control Patch
Ovulation

What If you miss three birth control pills?

If you miss three birth control pills, you may have some bleeding (as if it's the end of your pack) and the timing of your next period may be off. If that's the case, take a pregnancy test no sooner than 10 days after the last intercourse. Follow the directions that match your pill type: If you're on a combination pill with 30 or 35 mcg of estrogen

  • If you missed three or more active pills, or started the pack three days late, or had sex before you had taken seven pills during your very first pack, be sure to take additional steps to prevent pregnancy. Use the morning after pill if you already had sex. Use condoms or abstain from vaginal sex until you've taken the pill correctly for seven days in a row (after levonorgestrel) or fourteen days in a row (after ulipristal). If you're in the last week (days 15-21) of active pills, don't skip a week (Days 22-28 or use inactive pills), go straight to the new pill packet - again 7 pills in 7 days after Plan B or Next Choice, and 14 pills in 14 days after ella.

If you're on a combination pill with 20 mcg of estrogen or less

  • If you missed two or more active pills, or started the pack two days late, or had sex before you had taken seven pills during your very first pack, be sure to take additional steps to prevent pregnancy. Use the morning after pill if you already had sex. Use condoms or abstain from vaginal sex until you've taken the pill correctly for seven days in a row (if you took levnorgestrel emergency contraception) or fourteen days in a row (if you took ulipristal). If you're in the last week (days 15-21) of active pills, don't skip a week (Days 22-28 or use inactive pills), go straight to the new pill packet - again 7 pills in 7 days after levonorgestrel, or 14 pills in 14 days after ulipristal.

If you're on the progesterone-only pill

  • Consider using the morning after pill if you're late with your pill by more than three hours. Use a backup method until you've taken two pills in two days (after levonorgestrel) or 14 pills in 14 days (if you took ulipristal for emergency contraception).
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NuvaRing

What if you take birth control while you're pregnant?

It happens all the time and there are no known effects to the developing baby. If you start birth control and then find out you're pregnant, you will still have the option of continuing the pregnancy, if you like.
Your baby is gonna be gone
With all medication there are risks, but why take birth control during pregnancy.

if it's to control acne or other conditions I'm sure your doctor will advise against it strongly.

ALWAYS check with your doctor first.
Research has shown that birth control pills taken during the first month or two of pregnancy have no adverse effects on the fetus. Just stop taking them as soon as you find out you are pregnant. Good luck!


It depends on the type of birth control, but you are taking it for other reasons; depression, acne etc have your doctor switch you to another medication.
possibaly it can always check with your doctor but it is strongly advised not to take any medicine while pregnat without talking to your doctor first
I believe that if you take birth control during your pregnancy ....you can harm the child in someway. but if you want to becertain ......... you should talk to your doctor about it......... but if i were you..... don't take birth control during a pregnancy in case u can lose your baby
Don't continue to take it. It could harm the baby and there is no need to take it because you cannot get pregnant again if you are already pregnant

The Pill While PregnantCould it be harmful? Here are opinions and input:
  • If you accidentally took some birth control and then found out you are pregnant, the baby should be fine. However, see your doctor to make sure you are taking the right steps.
  • Studies have shown that taking birth control pills while pregnant results in an increased risk of birth defects.
  • The writing on the package states "Discontinue use if you become pregnant." If you know that you're pregnant stop taking the pills. (They wouldn't do you much good anyway!)
  • I think what this question is asking is if you're pregnant but don't know it yet and you're still taking the pill, if it's dangerous to the fetus. Well, I'm in that exact situation right now, and my doctor and obstetrician both said not to worry about it.
  • There is no proof that the birth control pill will harm your baby. If you are sure you are pregnant, stop taking the pill and see your doctor. Don't be overly alarmed if this happens. It's happened to others like yourself and the babies turn out perfectly healthy.
  • From what I have read it CAN. Look on any warning labels or the fact sheet sometimes given with the prescription. You should get to your doctor immediately for a test.
  • You REALLY shouldn't be taking birth control if you're pregnant.
  • You have to keep in mind that Yasmin birth control pills are on the FDA pregnancy category X. This means that it has been reported to cause birth defects in an unborn baby. Also remember that Yasmin passes into breast milk and may decrease milk production, so you must talk with your doctor before taking this medication is you are breast feeding.
  • Birth control can cause miscarriages.
  • being pregnant IS birth control!

Yes. if you are pregnante do not use birth contorl. Some say depo is a chemical abortion. and using other birth control while pregnante may cause unwanted birth defects.
If you're thinking about taking an overdose of contraceptive tablets to induce an abortion, you might want to read this first. Firstly, you probably won't be successful, since eight weeks into the pregnancy is far too late for a hormonal termination. If you were to try it anyway and fail, there will be lifelong consequences for your unborn child (and potentially long term consequences for you as well). At week 8, physical abnormalities are probably going to be the main long term effect. My mum took the overdose a bit later in the pregnancy, after week 15 and probably about week 20. After my male bits had completed their development, and during or just before the time the very first, most primitive sex-specific structures were being laid down in my brain. My endocrine system; the brain regions controlling physical sexual processes such as arousal and orgasm; and the regions controlling the deepest-seated instinctive social behaviour, in me all function like those of a woman rather than a man. Apart from a few random quirks, the rest of my brain and psychology (including my sexual orientation) is fully male. So, I have male anatomy but sexual functioning and needs of a woman, a very feminine face and body structure, and a tendency that I can't fully suppress to act like a woman rather than a man in any social situations where there are distinct male and female roles. My brain and psychology is otherwise predominantly male, with a few random female elements thrown in. In other words, I'm a complete mishmash of male and female. All thanks to Mum's actions during one of her self-indulgent "depressive" episodes. Life as a hermaphrodite has had its good points as well as bad ones, but I think that overall my life would have been more enjoyable and a lot less complicated as a normal man.

My mum died just over a year ago from glioma multiforme, an aggressive and incurable form of brain cancer that leads to a progressive loss of brain function. The site the tumour was in meant that she went blind quite early on, then bit by bit lost all sensory and motor functions, while remaining conscious and aware right up to the end. Glioma usually kills in a matter of months but in her case it took nearly 2 years. As the disease progressed, she began to increasingly experience these nightmarish but very vivid hallucinatory attacks. They mostly seemed to be based on actual past events, but distorted so there was never anything joyful in them, only unpleasantness. Sometimes the "plot" progressed in a linear way but quite often she'd get stuck in a loop, repeating the same sequence of emotions, words and actions again and again. No doubt it was just random damage to the memory circuits in her brain, but to me it seemed as if everything bad she'd ever done in life had come back to haunt her. Quite uncanny to watch. For the first year she could still hear us and feel us comforting her and we could bring her back out of the nightmare state, but by her final year of life she had lost most control of movement and nearly all sensory input. We could tell she was still having the hallucinations because she often showed strong emotions and was quite vocal at times. Even very near the end she was sometimes still aware of our presence and even able to converse. But, most of the time completely cut off with only her inner demons for company. We all die eventually but there are good ways and bad ways to go. Hers was not an easy exit. Probably just a coincidence, but hey. I believe that there is such a thing as karma, and if you do evil it always gets to you in the end. My advice is that if you can't get a legal abortion or you've already left it too late, don't ruin an innocent life through a botched DIY abortion. Do the right thing, and just have the baby. If you are unable or unwilling to look after it yourself, there are plenty of childless couples that would love to take care of it and give it the life it deserves.
You definitely shouldn't use it while pregnant.

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If you missed the first week of birth control pills 7 days 7pills and then on the day of unprotected sex you take one pill and he ejaculates in you will it prevent you from falling pregnant?

No. Birth control pills are based on progesterone being in your system long-term. Chances are, you have already ovulated by skipping those seven pills. The morning after pill (PlanB) can prevent pregnancy as long as it's taken within 120 hours after unprotected sex. Plan B is the same as taking multiple regular birth control pills.

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Does alcohol affect the birth control pill?

There are no drug interactions between alcohol and the birth control pill. Alcohol increases the risk of forgetting to take your pill.

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Can getting punched in the back prevent pregnancy?

Yes.

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Birth Control Patch

How effective is the birth control patch?

Fewer than one out of every 100 women who use Ortho Evra will become pregnant with perfect use.--from Planned Parenthood website

the birth control patch must be applied within the first 24 hours of starting your period or you must use back up contraception.

The short answer is "little chance."

HOWEVER, this is assuming that the patch is used exactly as prescribed and is used correctly. KEEP in mind that a birth control patch is like birth contol pills: they are 98%-99% effective, and they DO NOT protect either one of you from STD's-sexually transmitted disease.

To be extra safe from pregnancy or disease you really should use something else WITH the patch. CONDOMS are probably the best choice, but if you WILL NOT use one, I have another suggestion. There are little suppositories that goes in the girl's vagina about 15 minutes before sex. You don't need a prescription, they are in the pharmacy section. They melt in the girls vagina and prevent pregnancy also. PLUS, they have Nonoxyl-9 in them that also kills AIDS virus. One brand name is ENCARE. There are also other brands. Like I said CONDOMS are THE BEST bet, but if you absolutely won't use one, at least use something like Encare. Look on the box to make sure it has Nonxyl-9. Be SAFE.

.
Failure rates (first year)Perfect use≈1%Typical use≈1-2%

courtesy of wikipedia
no, me and my gf r having our 1st child. she OS 6 wks. prego and she was using the birth control patch and has been for the past 2 yrs.
No, the patch should be regulated into your body by now.
If used correctly, about 98%.
Birth control only protects you 98% against pregnancy. There is still a 2% risk of conceiving while on Birth control.

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Why are contraceptives important?

That is the only way for a woman to control her fertility if she wants to have a love life with her husband/boyfriend.

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