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Eastern Orthodoxy

A Christian Faith that believes in Jesus Christ as both Son of God and God, and in the Seven Ecumenical Councils of the Church. God is defined as the Holy Trinity, which is One God in Three Persons (God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit). The statement of the Orthodox Christian faith is the Nicene Creed.

2,233 Questions
History of Europe
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy

When and how did the Great Schism begin?

The "Eastern Schism" (as it is known in the Roman Catholic Church) or "Great Schism" (as it is known in the Orthodox Church) can be dated to 1054, when Cardinal Humbert and two papal legates delivered a bull of excommunication against Patriarch Caerularius of Constantinople (as well as Leo of Achrida and their adherents); other sources give the date of the schism as 1056. However, things are not really that simple. There were fractures before 1054 between Eastern and Western Christianity, and there were temporary reconciliations afterwards. For a more thorough coverage of the schism, from both the Orthodox and Roman Catholic viewpoints, see the first two links below. There was also a Western Schism (referenced in the previous answers listed here) which lasted from 1378 to 1417, but this was a division within the Roman Catholic Church and had nothing to do with Eastern Orthodoxy. See the other link below for more information on this event. Answer The Western Schism or Great Schism lasted from A.D. 1378 until A.D.1417 and began when the Roman mobs forced the College of Cardinals to elect an Italian as a pope. The cardinals declared the election invalid saying that they had voted under a lot of pressure. Later they elected a second Italian pope who refused to resign and the church faced the problem of being led by two popes. This problem became known as the Great Schism.

Answer This happened soon after the Great Schism of 1054 AD. The year 1054 AD is generally regarded as the final date of the split in the Universal Church, which began in the year 800 AD when Charlemange set himself up as a rival king to the Eastern Roman Emperor in Constantinople. The year 800 marks the beginning of the separation between the Latin West and the Orthodox East, which concluded in 1054 with the mutual excommunications by Cardinal Humbertus and Patriarch Michael I of Constantinople in the Church of Hagia Sophia. From 1054 onwards, the Western Christians became known as Roman Catholics and the Eastern Christians became known as the Orthodox Church. first of all, it is when did the great schism begin and i dont know

Answer2: As time passed, efforts were made to translate the Bible into the languages that people commonly spoke. Few could read the Bible in the Hebrew or Greek in which it was written. Almost 300 years before Jesus lived on earth, work began on translating the Hebrew Scriptures into Greek. That translation is known as the Greek Septuagint. Some 700 years later, Jerome produced a famous translation known as the Vulgate. This was a rendering of the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures into Latin, which was the common tongue of the Roman Empire of that time.

Later, Latin began to fade as a common language. Only the well-educated maintained familiarity with Latin, and the Catholic Church resisted efforts to translate the Bible into other languages. Religious leaders argued that Hebrew, Greek, and Latin were the only suitable Bible languages.

In the ninth century C.E., Methodius and Cyril, Thessalonian missionaries acting on behalf of the Eastern Church in Byzantium, promoted the use of Slavic as a church language. Their goal was to enable the Slavic peoples of Eastern Europe, who understood neither Greek nor Latin, to learn about God in their own language.

These missionaries, however, met with fierce opposition from German priests, who sought to impose Latin as a defense against the expanding influence of Byzantine Christianity. Clearly, politics were more important to them than people's religious education. Increasing tensions between the Western and Eastern branches of Christendom led to the division between Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy in 1054.

616263
Easter
Eastern Orthodoxy
Calendar

What day did Easter fall on in 1959?

It fell on Sunday, March 25, 1959.

Easter was not on March 25 in 1959. It was on March 29, 1959.

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Christianity
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy

What caused the split between the Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church?

The primary disagreement between the two branches of the Church were political in nature, but they were given, at the time of the break definite differences. The exact reasons latched onto for the actual split were the use of leavened bread in the East and the removal of the Holy Father's name from the diptychs.

(see the related question below)

from A Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957

The Schism of the East the estrangement and severance from the Holy See of what is now called the Orthodox Eastern Church was a gradual process extending over centuries. After a number of minor schisms the first serious, though short, break was that of Photius; from then on tension between East and West increased, and the schism of Cerularius occurred in 1054. From then on the breach gradually widened and has been definitive since 1472. There was a formal union from the 2nd Council of Lyons in 1274 until 1282, and a more promising one after the Council of Florence from 1439 to 1472. After the capture of Constantinople it was in the Turkish interest to reopen and widen the breach with the powerful Roman church; the patriarchates of Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were dragged into this policy, Russia and the Slav churches stood out the longest of any: none of these churches, except Constantinople itself in 1472, formally and definitely broke away from the unity of the Church. But in the course of centuries the schism has set and crystallized into a definite separation from the Holy See of many million people with a true priesthood and valid sacraments. The origins, causes and development of the schism are matters of much complication, still not fully unraveled.

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Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy
Greek Orthodoxy
The Difference Between

What is the primary difference between the Greek Orthodox Church and Catholic Church?

The Eastern (as opposed to the oriental) Orthodox Church in general (not just the Greek Orthodox jurisdiction) differs from the Catholic Church in:

Catholics believe the Pope is superior in authority in religious and administrative matters above all other bishops as well as having the ability to invoke papal infallibility when expressing dealing with dogmas affecting the belief of the universal Church with regards to Faith and Morals. (Jesus Christ granted Saint Peter, the first pope, this role when he said "thou art Peter; and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose upon earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven." - Matthew 16:18-19.) It is also held in Tradition that he is the infallable head. There are also many other Bible references, however that is the main one.

The Orthodox don't accept Christ's message to Peter as for him being the infallable head, they don't think he had any special difference.

The Catholic Church has the doctrine of the Virgin Mary's "Immaculate Conception", the Orthodox Church does not.

The Catholic Church believes in Purgatory, where the Orthodox does not believe in it.

There are tons of other minor differences, the ones above are just the major differences that I can think of.

353637
History of Russia
Eastern Orthodoxy
Roman Empire

Why did Kievan Russia become Orthodox Christian?

'Cause at that time there wasn't any more mighty and cultural naighbour around Kievan Russia than Byzantine Empire. And its princes like Oleg and Sviatoslav I of Kiev along with their wariors were very familiar with this Empire through their raids on Constantinopolis.

596061
Eastern Orthodoxy

What is Orthodoxy?

Orthodoxy (in greek language Ορθοδοξία), means the proper faith. Orthodoxy is used to characterize the faith of adherents of Christianism who are members of the Greek Orthodox Church, the Russian Church and other archdioceses that belong to the Patriarchate of Constantinople.

Orthodoxy is a concept of pure faith to the Holy Trinity released from human commitments to priests or the Patriarch. The most important thing is that every religionist is a free personality, who chooses wittingly to follow the teaching of Jesus Christ. In Orthodoxy, people don't believe in preists-Pope or another human being!The only pure and holy truth is the Holy Trinity. In Orthodoxy people's sins are forgiven through the holy mystery of the confession, which is being done face to face with the priest and not in hidden, in order to make this procedure more difficult and therefore more sincere.

The name orthodoxy came up after the Schism of Christian Church in two parts- The Orthodox and the Catholic Church. The argument was in the frase of the Prayer in which is said that the Holy Spirit derives from God. Catholic church believes that the Holy Spirit derives also from Jesus. That's why after the Schism the Eastern Church was renamed after the term Orthodox, to claim that the real belief was it's rules and prayers. Orthodoxy includes a hudge ecclesiastic tradition of scripts and hymns. Also several of the greatest spiritual scripts are written by Orthodox monks in greek language. Orthodoxy is the most liberal belief existing, because it respects the human being and cures all his debilities.

555657
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy

Why did the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Church split?

Historical background

During the period of persecution, the Early Christian Church developed differently according to the part of the Roman Empire; the Church in the East developed differently from the West and the Church in Africa (Copts) differed again. After the legalisation of Christianity, the Church came to accept that there were 3 main leaders (Patriarchs): the bishops of Alexandria, Antioch and Rome. To these were added the bishop of Constantinople (by the Council of Constantinople in 381) and the bishop of Jerusalem (by the Council of Chalcedon in 451).

With Constantine's transfer of the capital of the Empire to Constantinople, the Empire was effectively split into two sections: East and West. (Diocletian formally divided the Empire into 2 sections in early part of the 4th century)

The Church

When the western part of the Empire fell into decay, and was eventually overrun by invaders, the political, judicial and social responsibilities of its officials were assumed by the leaders of the Church in the West, centred on Rome. Inevitably, this dual responsibility led to a centralisation and codification of the manner in which things were done in the Western part of the Church. The Church in the East, largely unaffected by the collapse of the Western Empire, continued to be less centralised.

As time progressed, the Bishop of Rome (acknowledged by the others as being First Among Equals) began to claim greater authority due to the apostles Peter and Paul being martyred in that city. This claim was refuted by the other patriarchs. However, Rome's position became strengthened when the spread of Islam effectively isolated and diminished the influence the Patriarchs of Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem, leaving Rome and Constantinople in something of a state of rivalry.

A further cause of tension arose when the Western Church inserted the "filioque" into Nicene Creed. Traditionally, the Holy Spirit was seen to proceed from God the Father; the insertion of the "filioque" clause meant that, in the West, the Holy Spirit was believed to proceed from God the Father and God the Son. For the Church in the East, Rome had overstepped its authority by altering a Creed which had been approved by an ecumenical council. In 867 the Patriarch of Constantinople (Photius I)declared the insertion to be heretical, thereby accusing the Patriarch of the West (the Bishop of Rome) of heresy.

Other factors also caused the East and West to drift apart: language, different manners of liturgical celebration, different approaches to solving ecclesiastical conflict, different ways of explaining doctrine and the gradual imposition of clerical celibacy in the West.

The consummation of the schism is generally dated to 16 July 1054 due to a disagreement between the Patriarch of Constantinople and the papal legate who had been sent to solve a disagreement several matters: the type of bread to be used in the Eucharist, the claim to greater power by the Bishop of Rome and the Patriarch's use of the title "Ecumenical". Humbert felt insulted by the treatment he had received from the Patriarch who, apparently, kept him waiting. Although the pope (Leo IX) had been dead for some 3 months (and thus the legate's authority had ended) Humbert decided to excommunicate Patriarch Michael; the Patriarch reciprocated. It is rather simplistic to state that the East-West Schism occurred in 1054, as it had been developing for some time and it was clear that neither excommunication of 1054 included anyone other that the Patriarch, his followers and Cardinal Humbert; they did not apply to the churches.

In reality little changed in the lives of ordinary Christians or the clergy. The two churches continued to drift apart with the rise of nation states in the West (the Byzantine Empire continued) and the disaster of the Fourth Crusade when the crusaders attacked and looted Constantinople. There were futile attempts at reconciliation.

In brief, the schism between East and West developed over centuries and the reasons are several: linguistic, societal, judicial, ecclesiastical, political and theological. (PLease see related links)

The view held by religious authorities in the mainly Greek-speaking eastern regions was that there were 5 senior leaders, or Metropolitans, in the Christian Church, one of whom was the bishop of Rome. However, the bishop of Rome, known in the West as the Pope, insisted that he had greater authority than the other Metropolitans. Gradually, differences built up, but the key points of difference were an attempt by the bishop of Rome to change the Nicene Creed without a further Council of bishops, and Rome's objection to the Eastern churches allowing married priests.

The Great Schism resulted when Pope Leo IX sent legates to Patriarch Michael I, they attempted to excommunicate Michael and he then excommunicated the legates (Leo having died, Michael was unable to excommunicate him). There were attempts at reconciliation and the Churches came close to being reunited in 1274 and in 1439, but the schism eventually became permanent.

The western Church, based on Rome, has become known as Roman Catholic, while the eastern Churches have become known as Orthodox Churches.

Mainly because these two churches had minor disagreements. For example, Eastern Orthodox have different Holy Comunnion traditions. There are many differences. Catholic priests can not have children, but Eastern Orthodox priests can. Believe me, I believe in the Eastern Orthodox faith.

192021
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy
Russian Orthodoxy

What are the 9 ranks of angels in the Orthodox church?

The angelic hierarchy is shared by Catholics and Orthodox. The ranks are called 'Choirs'. They are Seraphim, Cherubim, Ophanim, Thrones, Dominions, Principalities, Powers, Archangels and Angels.

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Christianity
Eastern Orthodoxy
Greek Orthodoxy

What is the significance of the year 1056 for Greek Orthodox Christians?

I presume that you mean the year 1054, as I am not aware of 1056 having any significance for Orthodox Christians. The year 1054 AD is generally regarded as the final date of the split in the Universal Church, which began in the year 800 AD when Charlemange set himself up as a rival king to the Eastern Roman Emperor. The year 800 marks the beginning of the separation between the Latin West and the Orthodox East, which concluded in 1054 with the mutual excommunications by Cardinal Humbertus and Patriarch Michael Cerularius of Constantinople in the Church of Hagia Sophia.

From 1054 the Western Christians became known as Roman Catholics and the Eastern Christians became known as the Orthodox Church.

The excommunications of 1054 were later rescinded by Pope Paul VI and Ecumenical Patriarch Athenagoras of Constantinople in 1964, as an act of reconciliation, but the two sides remain separate to this day over unresolved theological disputes. The main points of contention are over the papal change to the Creed, by adding the 'filioque' clause, and the papal claims of supremacy over the whole church, which the Orthodox reject. The Orthodox Church accepts the Pope as an equal member of the Church, but does not accept his claims of being the supreme leader of the Church.

535455
Eastern Orthodoxy

What is the highest church official in eastern Orthodox Church?

The Ecumenical Patriarch (in Constantinople).

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Christianity
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy
Reformation History

What were separate eight-sided buildings near cathedrals and churches in the early Christian period were commonly used for?

These were baptisteries that were used for baptisms.

555657
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy

Is excommunication a practice of modern times?

People can still be excommunicated today. I have known at least one person who was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church because she got a divorce and remarried without permission of the Church.

Roman Catholic AnswerThe following sins bring about an automatic excommunication(just committing the sin makes you excommunicate):

1) An apostate from the faith, a heretic, or a schismatic

2) Profanation of the Eucharist

3) Physical attack against the Roman Pontiff

4) Absolution against an accomplice in a sin against the sixth Commandment

5) Consecration of a bishop without a pontifical mandate

6) A priest who violates the sacramental seal of confession

7) A person who procures a complete abortion

The following are not subject to a penalty when they have violated a law or precept:

1. a person who has not yet completed the sixteenth year of age

2. a person who without negligence was ignorant that he or she violated a law or precept; inadvertence and error are equivalent to ignorance

3. a person who acted due to physical force or a chance occurrence which the person could not foresee or, if foreseen, avoid

4. a person who acted coerced by grave fear, even if only relatively grave, or due to necessity or grave inconvenience unless the act is intrinsically evil or tends to the harm of souls

5. a person who acted with due moderation against an unjust aggressor for the sake of legitimate self defense or defense of another.

6. a person who lacked the use of reason, without prejudice to the prescripts of canon 1324, second 1, n. 2 and canon 1325

7. a person who without negligence thought that one of the circumstances mentioned in nn 4 or 5 was present

535455
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy
Similarities Between

What events led to the Great Schism between the Catholic and Orthodox churches?

  • One of the main reasons for the Greast Schism of 1054 AD is the disagreement between the Romans and Byzantines concerning the "filioque." The filioque refers to the relative divinity of God the Father compared to the Son. In the place where the original Nicene Creed reads "We believe in the Holy Spirit ... who proceeds from the Father", the amended, Roman Catholic version reads "We believe in the Holy Spirit ... who proceeds from the Father and the Son". The addition is accepted by Roman Catholic Christians but rejected by Eastern Orthodox Christians.
  • Additionally, there was also disagreement over the authority of the Pope.
  • Disagreements in uses of beliefs led to the Great Schism

Answer2: As time passed, efforts were made to translate the Bible into the languages that people commonly spoke. Few could read the Bible in the Hebrew or Greek in which it was written. Almost 300 years before Jesus lived on earth, work began on translating the Hebrew Scriptures into Greek. That translation is known as the Greek Septuagint. Some 700 years later, Jerome produced a famous translation known as the Vulgate. This was a rendering of the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures into Latin, which was the common tongue of the Roman Empire of that time.

Later, Latin began to fade as a common language. Only the well-educated maintained familiarity with Latin, and the Catholic Church resisted efforts to translate the Bible into other languages. Religious leaders argued that Hebrew, Greek, and Latin were the only suitable Bible languages.

In the ninth century C.E., Methodius and Cyril, Thessalonian missionaries acting on behalf of the Eastern Church in Byzantium, promoted the use of Slavic as a church language. Their goal was to enable the Slavic peoples of Eastern Europe, who understood neither Greek nor Latin, to learn about God in their own language.

These missionaries, however, met with fierce opposition from German priests, who sought to impose Latin as a defense against the expanding influence of Byzantine Christianity. Clearly, politics were more important to them than people's religious education. Increasing tensions between the Western and Eastern branches of Christendom led to the division between Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy in 1054.

535455
Easter
Eastern Orthodoxy
Greek Orthodoxy

What is the date of Orthodox Easter?

It will fall on these dates: Western Easter Orthodox Pascha ------- -------- 4 April 2010 4 April 2010 24 April 2011 24 April 2011 8 April 2012 15 April 2012 31 March 2013 5 May 2013 20 April 2014 20 April 2014 5 April 2015 12 April 2015 27 March 2016 1 May 2016 16 April 2017 16 April 2017 1 April 2018 8 April 2018 21 April 2019 28 April 2019

525354
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy

What caused Christianity to split into Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox?

A dispute over the Nicene Creed.

Roman Catholic AnswerThe reasons that caused the Eastern Orthodox to split from the Church were many and varied, and built up over a very long time. They were mainly political. The reasons given today: the Filoque clause of the Nicene Creed, the use of unleavened bread in the West and leavened in the East, the primacy of Bishop of Rome, are all factors which have been given - after the fact, but were not the causes.
515253
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy

Does the Eastern Orthodox Church accept icons in present day?

Yes, as icons are an essential part of the Christian Faith, according to the Seventh Ecumenical Council.

495051
Eastern Orthodoxy
Greek Orthodoxy
Russian Orthodoxy

Why does the Orthodox Church not believe in the veneration of images?

Jesus was asked by Pontius Pilate: "What is Truth?". To our minds would undoubtedly answer "It is a system of propositional truths like the Westminster Confession of Faith." In other words, we infer from his article that the Protestant mind subconsciously reads Jesus' words thus: "I am the Way, the Propositional Truth, and the Life...." This may sound unfair, but such an implication is inescapable within his apparent schema-one in which Jesus Christ is effectively reduced to a mere "propositional truth of the Father." We turn now to address his "confusion over divine revelation," namely, the erroneous reduction of the "Word of God" to "propositional truth" and the exclusion of the correlatives, word as image, image as word.

The nature of the icon cannot be grasped by means of pure art criticism, nor by the adoption of a sentimental point of view. Its forms are based on the wisdom contained in the theological and liturgical writings of the Eastern Orthodox Church and are intimately bound up with the experience of contemplative life.

The introduction into the meaning and the language of the icons imparts to us in an admirable way the spiritual conceptions of the Eastern Orthodox Church which are often so foreign to us, but without the knowledge of which we cannot possibly understand the world of the icon.

"It is not the purpose of the icon to touch its contemplator. Neither is it its purpose to recall one or the other human experience of natural life; it is meant to lead every human sentiment as well as reason and all other qualities of human nature on the way to illumination."

"The entire visible world as depicted in the icon is to foreshadow the coming Unity of the whole creation, of the Kingdom of the Holy Ghost."

The theological justification of the icon was derived by the Seventh Ecumenical Council from the fact of the Incarnation of God. God became human for the elation and deification of Man. This deification becomes visible in the saints. The Byzantine theologian often sets the calling of an icon painter on an equal level with that of a priest. Devoted to the service of a more sublime reality, he exercises his objective duty the same way as the liturgical priest. The "spiritual genuineness" of the icon, the cryptic, almost sacral power to convince, is not alone due to accurate observation of the iconographic canon, but also the ascetic fervor of the painter

Just as the Grace of the Holy Spirit which descended on the Apostles at Pentecost flows in a living stream down through today's bishops and priests, so Sacred Tradition carries the spiritual life of the Church in an unbroken stream from the time of the Apostles down to Orthodox believers today. Sacred Tradition includes the unwritten acts and teachings of Christ and the Apostles which the Church preserves unchanged for us all. (John 21:25; 2 Thess. 2:15; 2Thess. 3:6) The power of Sacred Tradition is the power of the Holy Spirit as it influences Orthodox Christians in all ages. Through Sacred Tradition we are in communion with the spiritual life of all preceding generations back to the Apostles.

Because the Son of God took on human flesh and became incarnate as the God-man Jesus Christ, it became possible to portray the glory of God incarnate. "Blessed are the eyes which see what you see!" (Luke10:23). The icons' style may seem austere and strange at first; they do not depict the natural beauty of the material world, but the spiritual beauty of the Kingdom of Heaven. Icons are venerated, BUT NOT WORSHIPPED, by Orthodox Christians. Free from the subjective, sentimental, and fleshy quality of Western religious art, the true icon is part of the Church's Sacred Tradition. A true icon, painted through the power of the Holy Spirit, is in communion with the spiritual life of the Church back to its earliest days.

Because of the unity of Sacred Tradition, icons -- like Orthodoxy itself -- exist as unchanging and ageless windows into the spiritual world. As you gaze into an icon, the calm eye of eternal truth falls upon you. And you begin to realize the true beauty and order of all things visible and invisible.

495051
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy
Medieval Religion

Did the Catholic Church institute the pre-trib rapture?

No. The Catholic Church has never acknowledged a pre-tribulation rapture as imagined by the Pentecostal religions. The Catholic Church has remained tight lipped on the subject of Revelation preferring to let the lessons of Jesus and the warnings of Revelation speak for themselves.

495051
History of Germany
Eastern Orthodoxy
Countries, States, and Cities
Prussia

What happened to the country of Pontos?

It was absorbed into the Roman Empire as an autonomous region. It maintained that status in the Ottoman Empire after the Ottomans conquered the region in the 15th century. With the formation of the modern nation of Turkey in the 20th century, it lost its autonomy and its people were all either killed or deported by the Turkish government.

495051
Economics
Eastern Orthodoxy
Monopoly (Business)

Why is a monopoly price maker but perfectly competition a price taker?

The answer to your question is quite complex, but in a very basic sense a monopoly faces no competitive constraints in the market. Under pure competition a firm can only charge the price that consumers are willing to pay. If you and I both own perfectly competitive coffee shops and I charge $1 for a cup of coffee while you are charging $2, the number of cups of coffee demanded at your shop will decrease while mine increases. I'll increase my supply as a result, and wind up raking in the cash. This will mean that you make a lot less money, and eventually you will have to change your price in order to make profits. In other words, you must TAKE the price that consumers are willing to pay, or they'll just go to other places. On the other hand, if you own the only coffee shop on the planet, you could charge whatever price you like since you control supply. No other firm can pop up and supply coffee at a lower price than yours because all of the coffee in the world comes from you. The bottom line is: a monopolist can set the industry supply curve wherever they please since they control all output, which means supply will intersect demand wherever the monopolist wants it to (which will be at the quantity where marginal revenue equals marginal cost, but that's a different story). This is by no means a complete answer, but I hope it helps.

515253
Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy
Medieval Religion

Which term is used to describe the split in Christianity that resulted in the Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church?

The split that resulted in the Orthodox leaving the Church is know as the Schism of the East:


FromA Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957


The Schism of the East the estrangement and severance from the Holy See of what is now called the Orthodox Eastern Church was a gradual process extending over centuries. After a number of minor schisms the first serious, though short, break was that of Photius; from then on tension between East and West increased, and the schism of Cerularius occurred in 1054. From then on the breach gradually widened and has been definitive since 1472. There was a formal union from the 2nd Council of Lyons in 1274 until 1282, and a more promising one after the Council of Florence from 1439 to 1472. After the capture of Constantinople it was in the Turkish interest to reopen and widen the breach with the powerful Roman church; the patriarchates of Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were dragged into this policy, Russia and the Slav churches stood out the longest of any: none of these churches, except Constantinople itself in 1472, formally and definitely broke away from the unity of the Church. But in the course of centuries the schism has set and crystallized into a definite separation from the Holy See of many million people with a true priesthood and valid sacraments. The origins, causes and development of the schism are matters of much complication, still not fully unraveled.


from Modern Catholic Dictionary by John A. Hardon, S.J. Doubleday & Co., Inc. Garden City, NY 1980


Separation of the Christian Churches of the East from unity with Rome. The schism was centuries in the making and finally became fixed in 1054, when the Patriarch of Constantinople, Michael Cerularisu (died 1059), was excommunicated by the papal legates for opposing the use of leavened bread by the Latin Church and removing the Pope’s name from the diptychs or list of persons to be prayed for in the Eucharistic liturgy. A temporary reunion with Rome was effected by the Second Council of Lyons (1274) and the Council of Florence (1439) but never stabilized.

456
Eastern Orthodoxy

Is Elaine an Orthodox saint name?

Elaine is indeed an Orthodox saint's name, as it is derived from the name Helen. St. Helen was the mother of St. Constantine the Great. Together, the two of them "discovered" the one true Cross upon which our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ was crucified. In fact, in their search for the foundations of the Christian faith, the mother and son duo came upon all three crosses from that historic day that were buried upon the hilltop of Golgotha. As a result, they were unsure as to which was the Cross belonging to Christ. One tradition of the story tells that a sweet-smelling herb began to grow at the foot of the one Cross. No one knew what the herb was, so they named it basil, which means "king", in honour of The Lord Himself.

Quoted from OrthodoxWiki, the information regarding the empress and holy saint is stated: "According to a number of early writers, the Empress Helen, (c.255-c.330 AD), mother of Constantine, the first Christian emperor of Rome, at a date after 312 AD when Christianity was legalized throughout the Empire, traveled to the Holy Land, founding churches and establishing relief agencies for the poor. It was at this time that she discovered the hiding place of three crosses used at the crucifixion of Jesus and the two thieves that were executed with him. By a miracle it was revealed which of the three was the True Cross"

Sts. Constantine and Helen are annually commemorated on May 21.

789
Eastern Orthodoxy
Social Network Websites
Facebook
Dog Breeding and Mating

Why do so many people like the Eastern Orthodox better?

Eastern Orthodox Church has preserved the true belief and the original worship practice for nearly 2000 years. Very few changes in doctrine were made after Pentacost in 33 AD.

My opinion is that this is the exact reason that once people are introduced to the Orthodox Church, they like what they see there, because it is the Original Church, the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church founded at Pentacost in 33 AD.

Answer

Some prefer the Orthodox Faith due to its genuineness/originality and its spiritual sacraments (IE. The Holy Eucharist, Confession,etc.)

474849
Eastern Orthodoxy

How was the Eastern Orthodox Church founded?

Jesus Himself has established His Church. Eastern Orthodox tradition preserves this very Church.

The Orthodox Church was founded by Christ in the year 33 AD, on the Day of Pentecost.

According to Orthodox Christian beliefs, the Orthodox Church has always existed from the beginning of time (called the Church Triumphant) but the physical church on earth (called the Church Militant) was established in Jerusalem in 33 AD and continues to exist without any changes to its dogmas and beliefs, to this day.

AnswerThere existed one Church for the first millennium of Christianity. During the later part of this time, the Catholic Church made several fundamental changes to the teaching and practice of the Church. The first was the addition of what is called the Filioque to the Nicene-Constantinople Creed, which stated that instead of proceeding from the Father as the Scriptures tell us, the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son. This doctrine existed early on and was started in Spain to counter the teachings of the Arians who believed Christ was not God. It is important to note that when St. Peter's basilica was built in Rome, Pope Leo refused to allow the Filoque to be carved into the stone with the Creed, but instead had the original Nicene-Constantinople Creed written in silver tablets, which is how it remains to this day. This was an issue of which the Orthodox took offense since the Creed was formulated during the First and Second Ecumenical (Church wide) Councils and the Creed was inspired by the Holy Spirit. Just as in Acts 15, the Church came together in Council and responded to the erroneous doctrines of the times. After this, the Pope of Rome attempted to increase his power stating that he had universal jurisdiction over the entire Church and supreme authority (which would later evolve into infallibility, the teaching that the Pope, when speak ex-cathedra, from the Chair of Peter, is incapable of error). The Patriarchs (Greek form of Pope) of Constantinople, Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandria rejected such claims, and thus the Pope schismed (broke away from) the other four who continued, and do continue to this day, the way things had been.

In short, I would say that the Orthodox Church came from none other than Christ, in the year 33 AD, and continues to hold fast to the Traditions of the Apostles.

AnswerOrthodox Faith was not just made. It is the continuation and the original interpretation of Jesus' teaching. Moreover this continuation was not done by someone foreign, distant person or group - it was done within the "One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church" or in other words the community that Jesus Himself has started. And this is fully in compliance with Matt 18:18: "I tell you the truth, whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven."

The Orthodox Christian faith was started by none other than Jesus Christ. When Christ ascended to heaven, He left Apostles to guide the Church with the promise of the Holy Spirit. The Apostles founded Churches throughout the Roman world and spread the Gospel. As they aged and/or were martyred for their faith, they chose successors to carry on their teachings. This continued right up until today when, in the Orthodox Church, our bishops are the direct decendents in both faith and practice of the Apostles. The Orthodox Church has continued and does continue to this day to be the Church founded by Christ.

Another view The Orthodox Church asserts that it is the Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church established by Christ and His Apostles and his almost 2,000 years ago. In doing so, it shares the same and contradictory belief of the Catholic church as well as various Protestant denominations. While some Christians, mainly Protestants would assert that the Orthodox Church adopted many traditions and beliefs not shared by the early apostles but rather adopted from cultures where the Church was established such as adoration of saints and veneration of icons thus distancing the Church from the ''true faith.''

Historically, the Church actually came into existence in the 11th century as the result of a schism between Rome and Constantinople or what is now known as the Catholic and Orthodox Churches respectively.

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Catholicism
Eastern Orthodoxy
Greek Orthodoxy

Is the leader of the Greek Orthodox Church the pope or the patriarch?

The Patriarch is the authoritative figure for The Greek Orthodox Church.

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