Greek Orthodoxy

A category with questions on Greek Orthodoxy, one of the many branches of the Orthodox Church.

Asked in Christianity, Catholicism, Greek Orthodoxy, Baptism and Christening

What is Baptismal Innocence?

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Baptismal Innocence is the time after Baptism when a person's soul is spotless. For babies who are Baptized this is from their Baptism until around the age of 7 when they are considered able to reason the difference between Good and Evil. For adults (those over the age of 7) who are Baptized it lasts until their next sin (probably a few minutes later). From the Catechism of the Catholic Church: By Baptism all sins are forgiven, original sin and all personal sins, as well as all punishment for sin. In those who have been reborn nothing remains that would impede their entry into the Kingdom of God, neither Adam's sin, nor personal sin, nor the consequences of sin, the gravest of which is separation from God. (CCC 1263)
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

How long does it take to convert to greek orthodox?

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That depends on the knowledge of the person seeking to convert. If they already know a lot about the religion, it could take a few months, but if not, it could take up to a year. An Orthodox priest will guide the person and let them know when they are ready.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

What is the sacred text of orthodoxy?

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There are two: 1) The Holy Bible, and 2) The Holy Tradition. The Orthodox Church views the Holy Bible as being very important, and equal with the Holy Tradition (ie. the unwritten and oral traditions of Jesus Christ and the Church). The Holy Scriptures are a collection of Books of the New Testament that came out of the Holy Tradition of the Early Christian Church. The Bible did not just appear out of thin air, it was revealed by God and later put together by the holy Fathers of the Orthodox Church. At the time when Jesus Christ established His Church in Jerusalem in 33 AD, there was no Bible. There were only the Old Testament scriptures. So for the first few centuries of its existence, the Church had no New Testament Scriptures at all, and for at least the first 500 years, there was no printed Bible as we have today. Most people could not even read or write and there was certainly no printing press at that time. The people would hear the Scriptures and hold the traditions they were taught by the priests and bishops at that time (2 Thess 2:15). Christ says, "blessed are those who hear the word of God and keep it" (Luke 11:28).
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

Who is the greek orthodox patron saint of teachers?

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They are the Three Graet Hierarchs :Basil the Grate known as Basil of Caesarea,Gregory the Theologian known also as Gregory of Nazianzus ,and John the Chrysostom.Patrons also of Letters and pupils.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

Who is the bishop of davao?

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If you are referring to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Davao, as far as I know is Archbishop Fernando Capalla. For the Greek Orthodox Church, Philippines (which includes the city of Davao) falls under the Metropolitanate of Hongkong and Southeast Asia. Metropolitan Nektarios Tsilis is the present Archbishop. For the Aglipayan Church, because they have two factions, Bishop Delfin Callao, Jr., is the present bishop of Philippine Independent Church while Bishop Perfecto Oberio is the Bishop for the Philippine Independent Catholic Church. I do not know for the other religions.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

When is Saint Sargis celebrated?

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St. Sargis Day is celebrated 63 days before Easter, on a Saturday falling sometime between Jan. 18 and Feb. 23
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

Can a woman become a Greek Orthodox Priest?

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No, but they can become nuns or serve God in many other ways. The place of women in the Orthodox Chuch is very important and should not be underestimated, but this does not extend to becoming priests. The reason for this is because the Orthodox Church follows the teachings of Jesus Christ, the Bible and the practices of the Holy Apostles. When Jesus chose people for His Ministry on earth, He called twelve male disciples to go and preach to the whole world. Then they chose another 70 male disciples, and so on for over 2,000 years. This is also in keeping with the Old Testament practice of choosing men to become priests of the Temple and rabbis of synagogues. So from this we conclude that Christ has called certain men (but not all men) to become His Priests. He could have chosen women, such as His own Mother, or Mary Magdalene, but did not. We are in no position to say that Christ was wrong in doing this, because Christ is God, and therefore He is without sin and makes no mistakes. This does not in any way mean that women are inferior to men. On the contrary, women were given the same possibility of salvation as men, for the first time in history by Jesus Christ. Baptism in Christ now enabled both males and females to be equally saved (Galatians 3:27-28). Christ also broke many of the social Jewish customs of that time, for example, by speaking with the Samaritan woman by the well, which was not permitted for any Jew to do. So Christ elevated women to the same status as men, but maintained their different roles in society. In other words, women are seen as equal, but different. In the Orthodox Church, the highest place that any human being has ever reached, was achieved by a woman, not a man. The Virgin Mary was the only human being to be elevated to the second highest position in Heaven! Second only to God Himself. After God, comes the Virgin Mary, and then the highest male,who was John the Baptist, and then the Apostles and others. So the highest position that any male on earth has ever reached was achieved by the Prophet St John the Bapstist, but even he is lower in status and importance than the Virgin Mary. Therefore any male or female can achieve greatness in the Church and become a great saint, but no one else can or ever will be able to reach the heights of the Virgin Mary, a woman, who achieved the highest place of any other human being on earth. Yet, the Virgin Mary did not have to become a priest in order to do this! God has given men and women different roles, and this is something that we humans cannot change. For example, God gave women the possibility of bearing children, which is a great blessing. But God did not give this same blessing to men. Does this mean that God has discrimination against men? Of course not! Men simply have to accept that only women can give birth to children. Both men and women can achieve salvation equally, by believing in God and being baptised (Mark 16:16) and by doing good works (James 2:14). Many men and women have become saints and martyrs in this way, and many more will be saved. Being a priest, or bishop, or monk or nun, still requires correct faith and good works, as it does for lay people. After all, the Virgin Mary was only a lay person, but she remained pure and faithful to God. She was a human being like any other woman on earth, yet she became higher than all other men and women and priests and bishops who have ever lived! So being a priest does not bring anyone salvation. In fact, it comes with a very heavy burden and responsibility: to preach correct doctrine. Just look at the example of the famous priest from Alexandria called Arius, who was declared to be a heretic by the church for preaching false doctrines (Arianism) about Christ. Also, Nestorius, who was Patriarch of Constantinople, was also condemned as a heretic for preaching fasle dogmas (Nestorianism), not to mention the betrayal of Christ by Judas Iscariot, who was one of the original Twelve Apostles. So do not think that being a priest or bishop or a disciple will automatically bring you any special blessing or greater benefit than you have now. Sometimes, it can even cause our downfall.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy, Russian Orthodoxy, Prophets

What is the name of the 4 Orthodox Patriarchs?

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1.)The Patriarch of Constantinople is Patriarch Barttholomew 2.)The Patriarch of Moscow is Patriarch Metropolian Kirill 3.)The Patriarch of Alexandria is Patriarch Thedore 2 4.)The Patriarch of Antioch is Bechara Peter Al-Rahi The 4 Patriarchs and the Pope is the leader of the Roman cathloic church Pope Benedict (2011)- ( ) and the 4 patriarchs are the leaders of the Orthodox church
Asked in Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Greek Orthodoxy

Why did the Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church split in 1054 AD?

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The Great Schism of 1054 AD had three main causes, which were: 1) Papal claims of supremacy, 2) the change to the Creed (adding the 'filioque'), and 3) Papal teachings about purgatory and indulgences. In addition to these, there were a few other lesser reasons, such as the use of unleavened bread, the laity receiving communion as bread only, rather than bread and wine together, the separation of baptism and confirmation, and the compulsory celibacy of Catholic clergy, the use of statues, and not allowing divorced people to re-marry. However, most other beliefs about the Christian faith remain the same. The reasons for the East/West schism are complicated and developed over a period of many centuries; even the date of 1054 is largely symbolic of a process that started much earlier and ended much later. There were cultural, linguistic, and liturgical differences from rather early, and although these were never seen as church-dividing, they probably contributed to mutual misunderstandings. The two biggest issues were the addition of the word filioque (and the Son) to the Western text of the Creed, and the growth of papal power. In addition were a host of smaller conflicts, over matters such as the use of leavened bread vs. unleavened bread for the Eucharist, fasting on Saturday, etc. The schism was probably inevitable by the ninth century, but a case can be made that it was not "final" until the East repudiated the reunion Council of Florence in 1453. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- : Historical background During the period of persecution, the Early Christian Church developed differently according to the part of the Roman Empire; the Church in the East developed differently from the West and the Church in Africa (Copts) differed again. After the legalisation of Christianity, the Church came to accept that there were 3 main leaders (Patriarchs): the bishops of Alexandria, Antioch and Rome. To these were added the bishop of Constantinople (by the Council of Constantinople in 381) and the bishop of Jerusalem (by the Council of Chalcedon in 451). With Constantine's transfer of the capital of the Empire to Constantinople, the Empire was effectively split into two sections: East and West. (Diocletian formally divided the Empire into 2 sections in early part of the 4th century) The Church When the western part of the Empire fell into decay, and was eventually overrun by invaders, the political, judicial and social responsibilities of its officials were assumed by the leaders of the Church in the West, centred on Rome. Inevitably, this dual responsibility led to a centralisation and codification of the manner in which things were done in the Western part of the Church. The Church in the East, largely unaffected by the collapse of the Western Empire, continued to be less centralised. As time progressed, the Bishop of Rome (acknowledged by the others as being First Among Equals) began to claim greater authority due to the apostles Peter and Paul being martyred in that city. This claim was refuted by the other patriarchs. However, Rome's position became strengthened when the spread of Islam effectively isolated and diminished the influence the Patriarchs of Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem, leaving Rome and Constantinople in something of a state of rivalry. A further cause of tension arose when the Western Church inserted the "filioque" into Nicene Creed. Traditionally, the Holy Spirit was seen to proceed from God the Father; the insertion of the "filioque" clause meant that, in the West, the Holy Spirit was believed to proceed from God the Father and God the Son. For the Church in the East, Rome had overstepped its authority by altering a Creed which had been approved by an ecumenical council. In 867 the Patriarch of Constantinople (Photius I)declared the insertion to be heretical, thereby accusing the Patriarch of the West (the Bishop of Rome) of heresy. Other factors also caused the East and West to drift apart: language, different manners of liturgical celebration, different approaches to solving ecclesiastical conflict, different ways of explaining doctrine and the gradual imposition of clerical celibacy in the West. The consummation of the schism is generally dated to 16 July 1054 due to a disagreement between the Patriarch of Constantinople and the papal legate who had been sent to solve a disagreement several matters: the type of bread to be used in the Eucharist, the claim to greater power by the Bishop of Rome and the Patriarch's use of the title "Ecumenical". However, in reality little changed in the lives of ordinary Christians or the clergy. The two churches continued to drift apart with the rise of nation states in the West (the Byzantine Empire continued) and the disaster of the Fourth Crusade when the crusaders attacked and looted Constantinople. In brief, as was already mentioned in the first , the schism between East and West developed over centuries and the reasons are several: linguistic, societal, judicial, ecclesiastical, political and theological. See related links Catholic There is no one simple for this tragic split of the Church into two halves, it went on for centuries, and if it had been a simple , would have been healed by now. But there are many things that went into it, sadly many of them were political not religious. It is to be hoped that the split will be healed soon, and we should all keep this in our daily prayers. . from The Modern Catholic Dictionary, edited by Donald Attwater, Second edition, revised 1957 The Schism of the East the estrangement and severance from the Holy See of what is now called the Orthodox Eastern Church was a gradual process extending over centuries. After a number of minor schisms the first serious, though short, break was that of Photius; from then on tension between East and West increased, and the schism of Cerularius occurred in 1054. From then on the breach gradually widened and has been definitive since 1472. There was a formal union from the 2nd Council of Lyons in 1274 until 1282, and a more promising one after the Council of Florence from 1439 to 1472. After the capture of Constantinople it was in the Turkish interest to reopen and widen the breach with the powerful Roman church; the patriarchates of Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem were dragged into this policy, Russia and the Slav churches stood out the longest of any: none of these churches, except Constantinople itself in 1472, formally and definitely broke away from the unity of the Church. But in the course of centuries the schism has set and crystallized into a definite separation from the Holy See of many million people with a true priesthood and valid sacraments. The origins, causes and development of the schism are matters of much complication, still not fully unraveled.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

When did the greek orthodox church begin?

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Upon the Resurrection of Christ.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy, Russian Orthodoxy

What is the primary difference between the Greek Orthodox Church and the Russian Orthodox Church?

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It's just a difference in administration. The beliefs are identical. If a Greek moves to Russia, he worships in a Russian Orthodox church, and vice versa. In the US, there will ultimately be only one administration, an American Orthodox church. At the moment there are several administrations, each under the supervision of the national church of another country. The Greek and the Russian are the largest of those administrations. Orthodox Christians in the US are free to worship at any Orthodox church, regardless of national origin. Those who are from an Orthodox country have so far tended more often to choose a church under the supervision of that country's national church. In addition, there may be some local variations in custom and tradition. For instance, compare the iconography of Russia with Greek icons, and both of those with Coptic. They are all icons, but look a little different based on local tradition. The Faith is one, but the Orthodox Church does not shy from embracing (and transforming) native cultures. Yeah theres realy not much of a difference just the languge,everything is the same icons church equipment and church dates.
Asked in Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Greek Orthodoxy

What is an Orthodox Mass?

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In the Orthodox Church, this rite is usually called the Divine Liturgy, rather than the Mass. It is the most important sacrament (or mystery) of the Church, celebrated every Sunday and on feast days throughout the year (in some communities, particularly in monasteries, it is celebrated every day, except on the weekdays of Great Lent). The Divine Liturgy, which is always sung throughout, consists of two parts: the Liturgy of the Catechumens, and the Liturgy of the Faithful. The first conists of psalms, hymns, and an Epistle and Gospel reading. The second is focused on the rite of Holy Communion. Orthodox believe, as do Roman Catholics, that the bread and wine offered are changed truly and substantially into Christ's Body and Blood, although the Orthodox have not developed a technical explanation of this along the lines of the Roman Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation. Orthodox also believe that the Eucharist is a sacrifice, albeit an unbloody one; it is the selfsame Sacrifice offered by Christ on the Cross. The Holy Gifts are distributed in both kinds. The faithful receive a portion of the Body of Christ, together with a portion of the Precious Blood, from a spoon.
Asked in Eastern Orthodoxy, Greek Orthodoxy, Russian Orthodoxy

What is the head of an Eastern Orthodox monastery called?

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He is an abbot or protos. You can also have an Archimandrite, who usually leads a group of monks or monasteries. An Abbot is the head of one monastery, as is also sometimes called by the Greek name of "Hegumen" or "Hegumenos." The other Greek title of "protos" means the first.
Asked in Christianity, Eastern Orthodoxy, Greek Orthodoxy

What is the significance of the year 1056 for Greek Orthodox Christians?

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I presume that you mean the year 1054, as I am not aware of 1056 having any significance for Orthodox Christians. The year 1054 AD is generally regarded as the final date of the split in the Universal Church, which began in the year 800 AD when Charlemange set himself up as a rival king to the Eastern Roman Emperor. The year 800 marks the beginning of the separation between the Latin West and the Orthodox East, which concluded in 1054 with the mutual excommunications by Cardinal Humbertus and Patriarch Michael Cerularius of Constantinople in the Church of Hagia Sophia. From 1054 the Western Christians became known as Roman Catholics and the Eastern Christians became known as the Orthodox Church. The excommunications of 1054 were later rescinded by Pope Paul VI and Ecumenical Patriarch Athenagoras of Constantinople in 1964, as an act of reconciliation, but the two sides remain separate to this day over unresolved theological disputes. The main points of contention are over the papal change to the Creed, by adding the 'filioque' clause, and the papal claims of supremacy over the whole church, which the Orthodox reject. The Orthodox Church accepts the Pope as an equal member of the Church, but does not accept his claims of being the supreme leader of the Church.
Asked in Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Greek Orthodoxy, The Difference Between

What is the primary difference between the Greek Orthodox Church and Catholic Church?

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The Eastern (as opposed to the oriental) Orthodox Church in general (not just the Greek Orthodox jurisdiction) differs from the Catholic Church in: Catholics believe the Pope is superior in authority in religious and administrative matters above all other bishops as well as having the ability to invoke papal infallibility when expressing dealing with dogmas affecting the belief of the universal Church with regards to Faith and Morals. (Jesus Christ granted Saint Peter, the first pope, this role when he said "thou art Peter; and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose upon earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven." - Matthew 16:18-19.) It is also held in Tradition that he is the infallable head. There are also many other Bible references, however that is the main one. The Orthodox don't accept Christ's message to Peter as for him being the infallable head, they don't think he had any special difference. The Catholic Church has the doctrine of the Virgin Mary's "Immaculate Conception", the Orthodox Church does not. The Catholic Church believes in Purgatory, where the Orthodox does not believe in it. There are tons of other minor differences, the ones above are just the major differences that I can think of.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

Why was greek religion important to the Greeks?

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Well people/countries have different religions (you probably do too) so it's simple peoples religion is important them
Asked in History of Europe, Greek Orthodoxy

How do you join the Greek Orthodox Church?

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How does one "join" the Greek Orthodox Church? The answer is that first, you must attend the Greek Orthodox (or any) Christian church to become a member of that church. The Greek Orthodox Church is an organization, not just the one church on the corner. As a whole, it has specific beliefs that one must agree with: *You must believe that the Holy Bible is the word of God *You must believe that Jesus Christ is the Messiah and Savior Sent by God, and is God's Holy Son *You must believe that the Holy Spirit was sent by Jesus to comfort mankind in the absence of Jesus Christ *You must believe that God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit are One, Indivisible God - a Trinity *You must be willing to be baptized according to the Greek Orthodox Church's proceedures *You must be willing to take communion *You must be willing to make a confession of your sins to a Priest of the Orthodox Church *You must be willing to turn away (repent) from your sins and attempt to change your lifestyle Once you are willing to do these things, then you make an appointment with your Priest and tell him that you want to join the Greek Orthodox Church - your priest will make arrangements for your education in Christianity per the Greek Orthodox Church, and help you to arrange to do the things listed above that you need to do, and then do these things to or for you, so that you become a member of the Greek Orthodox Church. Really, to become a member, you must work with your Priest to arrange it, as in any church. Most churches have some proceedures that people go through to join up. Usually these things are arranged by a group of volunteers or office workers who operate under the direction of the Head Minister or Priest. They "know" what to do, how to arrange things, and so on. Usually, before any church will permit you to join, they want to ensure that you understand and agree with what they teach and how they teach it. After you know what the beliefs are and you agree with them, then these people will assist you in the rest of your journey in membership. It also may depend on whether you are already a Christian, or if you are a convert from a different religion. The Bottom Line at the Greek Orthodox or any other Church? Attend first, then make an appointment with the Priest or minister for instructions about what to do next. You will be gently guided through the rest of the process.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

What is Greek Orthodox?

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This refers to the Greek Orthodox Church, which is the main denomination in Greece. It is one of the fifteen autocephalous (meaning self-governing) Orthodox churches which make up the Eastern Orthodox Church. That term can also denote any Eastern Orthodox church that uses Byzantine Rite Liturgy. The national churches of Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania and Russia (as well as other countries) also belong to the Eastern Orthodox Church. Pope of Rome split away from all the other Patriarchs and Patriarch of Constantinople in particular in the early Middle Ages. The breach became definitive in 1054 from which point until now, Rome is not in communion with any of the Eastern Orthodox churches. The term "Greek Orthodox" is also sometimes used outside of Greece, in countries of the 'diaspora' such as the USA, Britain and Australia. This is not the correct Orthodox historical practice, and only exists today because the Orthodox Church in these countries began with a migrant population from Greece, with the language of the Liturgy being Greek. For this reason they kept the name "Greek Orthodox." The problem with using this name today, is that it makes the Orthodox Church look like an exclusive Greek club for Greeks only. This is certainly not the case. The Orthodox Church has no nationality, and is open to persons of every ethnic and national background. In Western countries in particular, the Orthodox people should prefer to use the correct title of "Orthodox Christian" or "Eastern Orthodox" without adding any national titles of Greek or Russian, etc. The only place where the name "Greek Orthodox" should be used (if at all) is in Greece. In other countries, such as the USA, Britain and Australia, it should be called by its proper jurisdictional tile of "Ecumenical Patriarchate" or "Holy Archdiocese of Australia" or "Holy Archdiocese of America" etc.
Asked in Easter, Eastern Orthodoxy, Greek Orthodoxy

What is the date of Orthodox Easter?

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It will fall on these dates: Western Easter Orthodox Pascha ------- -------- 4 April 2010 4 April 2010 24 April 2011 24 April 2011 8 April 2012 15 April 2012 31 March 2013 5 May 2013 20 April 2014 20 April 2014 5 April 2015 12 April 2015 27 March 2016 1 May 2016 16 April 2017 16 April 2017 1 April 2018 8 April 2018 21 April 2019 28 April 2019
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

Do people tithe at a Greek Orthodox Church?

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Generally speaking, tithing is done on a voluntary basis. Each person tithes according to what they think is appropriate. There is no specific amount (such as 10%) that is required. It also depends on what each person can afford.
Asked in Eastern Orthodoxy, Greek Orthodoxy, Russian Orthodoxy

Why does the Orthodox Church not believe in the veneration of images?

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Jesus was asked by Pontius Pilate: "What is Truth?". To our minds would undoubtedly answer "It is a system of propositional truths like the Westminster Confession of Faith." In other words, we infer from his article that the Protestant mind subconsciously reads Jesus' words thus: "I am the Way, the Propositional Truth, and the Life...." This may sound unfair, but such an implication is inescapable within his apparent schema-one in which Jesus Christ is effectively reduced to a mere "propositional truth of the Father." We turn now to address his "confusion over divine revelation," namely, the erroneous reduction of the "Word of God" to "propositional truth" and the exclusion of the correlatives, word as image, image as word. The nature of the icon cannot be grasped by means of pure art criticism, nor by the adoption of a sentimental point of view. Its forms are based on the wisdom contained in the theological and liturgical writings of the Eastern Orthodox Church and are intimately bound up with the experience of contemplative life. The introduction into the meaning and the language of the icons imparts to us in an admirable way the spiritual conceptions of the Eastern Orthodox Church which are often so foreign to us, but without the knowledge of which we cannot possibly understand the world of the icon. "It is not the purpose of the icon to touch its contemplator. Neither is it its purpose to recall one or the other human experience of natural life; it is meant to lead every human sentiment as well as reason and all other qualities of human nature on the way to illumination." "The entire visible world as depicted in the icon is to foreshadow the coming Unity of the whole creation, of the Kingdom of the Holy Ghost." The theological justification of the icon was derived by the Seventh Ecumenical Council from the fact of the Incarnation of God. God became human for the elation and deification of Man. This deification becomes visible in the saints. The Byzantine theologian often sets the calling of an icon painter on an equal level with that of a priest. Devoted to the service of a more sublime reality, he exercises his objective duty the same way as the liturgical priest. The "spiritual genuineness" of the icon, the cryptic, almost sacral power to convince, is not alone due to accurate observation of the iconographic canon, but also the ascetic fervor of the painter Just as the Grace of the Holy Spirit which descended on the Apostles at Pentecost flows in a living stream down through today's bishops and priests, so Sacred Tradition carries the spiritual life of the Church in an unbroken stream from the time of the Apostles down to Orthodox believers today. Sacred Tradition includes the unwritten acts and teachings of Christ and the Apostles which the Church preserves unchanged for us all. (John 21:25; 2 Thess. 2:15; 2Thess. 3:6) The power of Sacred Tradition is the power of the Holy Spirit as it influences Orthodox Christians in all ages. Through Sacred Tradition we are in communion with the spiritual life of all preceding generations back to the Apostles. Because the Son of God took on human flesh and became incarnate as the God-man Jesus Christ, it became possible to portray the glory of God incarnate. "Blessed are the eyes which see what you see!" (Luke10:23). The icons' style may seem austere and strange at first; they do not depict the natural beauty of the material world, but the spiritual beauty of the Kingdom of Heaven. Icons are venerated, BUT NOT WORSHIPPED, by Orthodox Christians. Free from the subjective, sentimental, and fleshy quality of Western religious art, the true icon is part of the Church's Sacred Tradition. A true icon, painted through the power of the Holy Spirit, is in communion with the spiritual life of the Church back to its earliest days. Because of the unity of Sacred Tradition, icons -- like Orthodoxy itself -- exist as unchanging and ageless windows into the spiritual world. As you gaze into an icon, the calm eye of eternal truth falls upon you. And you begin to realize the true beauty and order of all things visible and invisible.
Asked in Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Greek Orthodoxy

Is the leader of the Greek Orthodox Church the pope or the patriarch?

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The Patriarch is the authoritative figure for The Greek Orthodox Church.
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

Where is there a Greek Orthodox church in the Wyndham New York area?

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I know of no city called Wyndham, NY. There are 51 Greek Orthodox Churches in the State of New York. Youj may look them up on the following website: www.goarch.org/en/parishes
Asked in Eastern Orthodoxy, Spain, Medieval Religion, Greek Orthodoxy

Where are Serbian Orthodox churches in Spain?

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Parish of the Mother's of God Protection c / Aragó, 181, 08011 Barcelona, Spain AND Paroquia Ortodoxa de San Andrés y San Nicolás Virgen del Socorro, 59, 03001 Alicante, Spain Hipodiácono Nicolás, Telephone: 676 929 455, parroquiaortodoxaalicante@msn.com
Asked in Greek Orthodoxy

In what country did the Greek Orthodox religion originate?

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The principal early Christian sects are generally known today as Catholic Orthodox Christianity and Gnosticism, although other groups also existed. Eventually, Roman state patronage for the Catholic Orthodox Church ensured that it was able to expropriate the property of other churches which did not share their views, and provided a cover for persecution until there was essentially only one Christian Church left in the Roman Empire. The Council of Nicaea, called by the Roman Emperor Constantine, decided that Christianity in the Roman Empire would be led by four senior bishops or Metropolitans representing Rome, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem. The Council made also provision for Constantinople and Carthage, where Metropolitans were subsequently appointed, although the role was short-lived in Carthage. The view held by religious authorities in the mainly Greek-speaking eastern regions was that the Metropolitans were of equal authority, but the bishop of Rome, designated as the Pope, insisted that he had greater authority than the others. Gradually, differences built up until the Great Schism of 1054, when Pope Leo IX and Patriarch Michael I excommunicated each other. There were attempts at reconciliation and the Churches came close to being reunited in 1274 and in 1439, but the schism eventually became permanent. The western Church, based on Rome, has become known as Roman Catholic, while the eastern Churches have become known as Orthodox Churches. Constantinople, in modern Turkey, was the main centre of the Greek Orthodox Church.