Historical Figures

Historical figures are the various individuals throughout time that have made their mark. Some have done this through a series of great acts. Some have done just one thing, but they made a huge impact through their choice.

2,034 Questions
Colonial America
Historical Figures

What did Daniel Boone lead many pioneers through?

Daniel Boone led many pioneers on the Wilderness Road/Wilderness Trail, through the Cumberland Gap in the Appalachian Mountains from North Carolina and Tennessee into Kentucky.

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Domestic Dogs
Historical Figures

What historic item was accidentally discovered in 1940 by 4 boys looking for their lost dog?

Lascaux Cave Paintings

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Historical Figures
Cowboys and Cowgirls

What did Buffalo Bill do to make himself famous?

Buffalo Bill, aka William F. Cody, was made famous the world over by his traveling show, "Buffalo Bill' Wild West." His show featured not only himself, but also such heroes as sharpshooter Annie Oakley, Buck Taylor -- the first King of the Cowboys, and Chief Sitting Bull.

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Historical Figures

Who used the statement success often comes to those with humble beginnings would apply to the historical figures?

Franklin D Roosevelt

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Native American History
India
Mohandas Gandhi
Historical Figures

What did the Indians call Gandhi?

Indians view Gandhi : due to his contribution in the gaining independence from the British, as " The Father of the nation" .

Hence he is reffered to as "Bapuji" or " Bapu" ( Father in Hindi )

He is also sometimes reffered to as "Mahatma" ( Great in Hindi )

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Hinduism
Age of Enlightenment
Historical Figures

Who are the important figures of Hinduism?

Do you mean "FIGURES" as numbers or pattern? The number is "OM" the patterns is "OM". It is a mantra. You can chant; "Om mani Padma Hum".

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Shotguns
Historical Figures
Daniel Boone

What is the value of a 16 gauge Daniel Boone shotgun?

I also have a Daniel Boone shotgun, 12 guage. Do you know who made this gun? I need to replace the stock. Daniel Boone Gun Company: Trade name used by the Belknap Hardware Company of Louisville, Kentucky on firearms they retailed, 1900-1935. It is most likely a single shot or double barrel. The first would be worth $40-$80 and the second $150-$250, depending on the condition, if you can find an interested buyer (the name may generate a little interest). Finding a stock might be possible if you can determine the actual manufacturer's model. If there is a model number on the gun, it might be in Numrich Gun Parts' cross reference list, but all the Belknap guns listed are Springfield/Stevens/Savage models, so you might look for parts for their models 67, 87N, 87J, 94C, 94D, 120, 745, 940E, 947, or 947B.

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Judaism
Historical Figures

Cities of major historical importance in judaism?

The holy land for Judaism is Israel (see Deuteronomy 11:11-12), and the holy city is Jerusalem.


Jerusalem is the center of Judaism. It is important to Jews because it was chosen by God (Zechariah 3:2). It was the site of the Akeidah (Binding of Isaac, in Genesis ch.22) and was later the seat of the Davidic Kings, when King David, Israel's greatest king, founded the dynasty that ruled Judah for much of its history, making Jerusalem the capital of the United Kingdom of Israel during his reign and that of his son, King Solomon.

Most importantly, it was the location of the First and Second Temples, where offerings were made to God and where His presence dwelt in the Holy of Holies (1 Kings ch.8) and was manifested in a number of miracles (Mishna, Avot ch.5).
Jerusalem is called the holy city by the prophets (Isaiah 52:1). It was where Jews would go three times a year to celebrate the holiest festivals (Deuteronomy ch.16). Even after the destruction of the Temple, the Temple Mount and adjacent Western ("Wailing") Wall, which still stands, is the holiest site in Judaism. It is hoped and prophesied (Ezekiel ch.40-44) that one day a third temple will be rebuilt in Jerusalem and that the Messiah will come to it.

Jerusalem has become representative of the connection with the Divine. Jerusalem is also seen as the source of Divine Law, as demonstrated in many Jewish prayers: "Ki miTziyon tetze Torah udvar Hashem miYerushalayim - From Zion comes the Torah and the Word of God from Jerusalem" (Isaiah 2:3). Jerusalem is also representative of the Redemption of the Jewish people from their physical and spiritual exile, because this exile causes the melancholy that the Jewish people experience by being apart from God's presence. The Redemption, which Jews believe will be brought by the Messiah, will result in the Jewish people returning to Jerusalem.

According to ancient Hebrew tradition, Jerusalem is the site where God took the very earth from which Adam, the first man, was formed (midrash Rabbah 14:8). Read Genesis carefully; Adam was not created in the garden of Eden; he was taken there. Jerusalem, because it is the first place on Earth where the spirit of God dwelt, is considered a direct link to God.

Judaism is the oldest monotheistic religion and Jerusalem has been its only holy site for over 3000 years. King Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed by invading Babylonians, and rebuilt at the same site (known as the Temple Mount) about 2500 years ago. It was then destroyed again when the Romans conquered Judea about 2000 years ago, killing a million Jews. All Jews who value their heritage feel ties to Jerusalem and the holy land, where so many of their people struggled for the freedom to practice Judaism. At the same time, Jews believe that all people should be welcome there, regardless of faith.

Jerusalem is the eternal Jewish city, and a symbol of a future time of peace. Jerusalem is also the focal point of prayer of the Jews. When they pray, wherever they are, they face towards Jerusalem (Talmud, Berakhot 30a), with love and longing. The sentiment is aptly expressed in Psalm 137: "By the waters of Babylon, there we sat and wept as we remembered Zion....If I forget you, Jerusalem, let my right hand forget its wisdom." For thousands of years we remembered our exile and prayed for its end. Now at least we can do so from "up close."
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Historical Figures
Buddhism

Who are historical figures of Buddhism?

With a history that crosses 2600 ( that's 26 centuries!)there are many historical dates and figures...There is King Ashoka and his Stone Edicts marking the dharma teachings...a warrior king who rejected his violent life and converted to Buddhism...promoting it tirelessly in approximately 250 BCE. 220 BCE the Theraveda was introduced into Ceylon (Sri Lanka)where it exists nearly unchanged even to this day. Approximately 100 BCE...the teachings of the Buddha were finally codified in written form and became known as the pali Tipitaka (Three Baskets of Law)...1000 CE...Bodhidharma brings mahayana Buddhism to china, where it meets and melds with taloism and brings into the world the sect called ch'an (zen in Japanese, son in Korean, thien in Vietnamese)700 CE.....1220 CE....zen master Dogen Zenji brings the caodong school of Buddhism to Japan where it eventually becomes called the Soto sect. The list could take volumes....Buddhism has na amazing history...Aesops fables?> From the Buddhist jakata tales ..stories of the buddha as a child and as a previously incarnated buddha, brought westward by Arabic traders.

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History, Politics & Society
Historical Figures

What is James bowie famous for?

James Bowie is *famous* 4 fighting at the Battle of the Alamo and 4 introducing the Bowie knife (his brother actually created it).

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World War 2
Historical Figures

Who are historical figures of World War 2?

the Maori Battalion from New Zealand. the Maori Battalion from New Zealand.
FDR, Churchill, Stalin, Hitler, Tojo, Mussolini, Eisenhower, MacArthur, Wainright, Nimitz, Halsey, Patton, Bradley, MacAuliffe, Ridgway, Montgomery, Homma, Yamamoto, Hirohito, Doolittle, Rommel, Guderian, Goebbels, Eichmann, Yamashita, Goering, Demming, Higgins, Baum, Abrams, Taylor, Block, Sousley, Hayes, Strank, Gagnon, James Bradley, Rosenberg, Audie Murphy, Tito, Zuchkov, Chennault, Hodges, US Army, US Navy, Us Marines, US Army Air Force, Us Coast Guard - to mention a few.

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Judaism
Calendar
Historical Figures

What was the historical beginning of judaism?

Tradition states that Abraham (18th century BCE) founded Judaism, and Moses later received the Torah from God.

Abraham, tenth-generation descendant of Noah, of Hebrew lineage, was the son of Terah, uncle of Lot, father of Isaac, grandfather of Jacob, and forefather of the Israelites. His story is in Genesis ch.11 (end), through ch.25. Jewish tradition states that he was the first to actively spread belief in One God; and it is in his merit that Jews continue to exist (Genesis 18:19, and ch.17).

Abraham came from ancestry that had been aware of God a couple of centuries earlier but had afterwards slipped into idolatry (Joshua 24:2).

By the time of Abraham, the area where he lived was full of pagan cults; they were polytheistic, worshiping multiple deities.

Abraham became the first to advance the idea of ethical monotheism: the worship of One God, and the appropriate ethical code of conduct.


Nimrod, the idolatrous tyrant, had brought Abraham's father (Terah) from the Semitic ancestral seat near the confluence of the Balikh and the Euphrates, and instated him in a position of power in his army in the royal Babylonian city of Ur, where Abraham was born. Nimrod persecuted any who would question his idolatrous cult.


The Kuzari (Rabbi Judah HaLevi, 1075-1141) states that Abraham was gifted with high intelligence; and, as Maimonides (1135-1204) describes, Abraham didn't blindly accept the ubiquitous idolatry. The whole populace had been duped, but the young Abraham contemplated the matter relentlessly, finally arriving at the conclusion that there is One God and that this should be taught to others as well. This is what is meant by his "calling out in the name of the Lord" (Genesis ch.12).

As a young man, he remonstrated with passersby in public, demonstrating to them the falsehood of their idols; and our tradition tells how he was threatened and endangered by Nimrod.
Subsequently, Terah relocated to Harran; and it is here that Abraham began to develop a circle of disciples (Rashi commentary, on Genesis 12:5).


Later, God told Abraham in prophecy to move to the Holy Land, which is where he raised his family.


He continued his contemplations, eventually arriving at the attitudes and forms of behavior which God later incorporated into the Torah given to Moses.


Abraham became the greatest thinker of all time. His originality, perseverance, strength of conviction, and influence, cannot be overestimated.

Abraham, with God's help, trounced the supremacy of the evil Nimrod.

He received God's promise of inheriting the Holy Land (Genesis ch.13).

He strove to raise a family (Genesis ch.15, 17, and 24) which would serve God (Genesis 18:19); and God eventually blessed his efforts, granting him numerous descendants (ibid., ch.16, 21 and 25), in keeping with His promise (Genesis ch.17).

Abraham founded the Jewish people and lived to see his work live on in the persons of Isaac and Jacob; and he taught many other disciples as well (Talmud, Yoma 28b).

He saved the population of the south of Canaan from invading foreign kings (Genesis 14); and he was feared by neighboring kings (ibid., ch.12 and 20).

Abraham gave tithes (Genesis ch.14), entered into a covenant with God (Genesis ch.15 and 17), welcomed guests into his home (Genesis ch.18) unlike the inhospitable Sodomites (Genesis ch.19), prayed for people (Genesis ch.18), rebuked others when necessary (Genesis ch.20), eulogized and buried the deceased (Genesis ch.23), and fulfilled God's will unquestioningly (Genesis ch.22).

He became renowned as a prince of God (Genesis 23:6).

The gravesite of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and their wives (Genesis 49:29-32) is located in Hebron and has been known and attested to for many centuries.

All of the above practices of Abraham were based upon the ways of God, which Abraham understood through his contemplations. These, and similar personality traits, were the teachings of Abraham and his descendants (unlike idolatry, which had no moral character; with worship of the gods accompanied by things such as human sacrifice, "sacred" prostitution, and animal worship).

It is therefore clear why God expresses His love for Abraham (Isaiah 41:8) and calls Himself the God of Abraham (Genesis 26:24), and says that Abraham obeyed Him fully (Genesis 26:5). And this is why Abraham is credited with having begun the religion which became known as Judaism. (However, Abraham and his descendants observed their traditions voluntarily, until the Giving of the Torah to Moses 3325 years ago, when God made it obligatory.)

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Judaism
Historical Figures

What is the figure of Judaism?

It depends on how the word "figure" is read.

If it is referring to which human being is the most important historical personage in Judaism, that would be the Prophet Moses, who received the Torah and helped the Jews escape bondage in Egypt.

If it is referring to which symbols represent Judaism, those would be the Star of David and the Menorah (or candelabra).

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Judaism
Historical Figures
Socialism

What are some of the historical events and figures of Judaism?

All of the dates and information provided below are based on the Jewish Torah, Talmud and oral tradition. Note that many hundreds of names and dates have been omitted for the purpose of brevity, and descriptions have been kept to a minimum. See the highlighted Related Links for more complete detail.
Era of the Patriarchs:

  • Avraham, founder of Jewish belief, born 1812 BCE (= "Before the Common Era"). Abraham founded the tradition of monotheism, which is the belief in One God. (See: A biography of Abraham)
  • Yitzchak (Isaac), second of the Avot (Patriarchs), born 1712 BCE. (See: A biography of Isaac, Jacob and Joseph)
  • Yaakov (Jacob), third of the three Patriarchs, born 1652 BCE.
Era of the sojourn in Egypt:
  • Yosef (Joseph), born 1563 BCE, became Viceroy of Egypt.
  • The sojourn in Egypt was 1522-1312 BCE. The enslavement in Egypt began in 1428 BCE.

Moses and Joshua:
  • Moshe (Moses) was born in 1392 BCE. He played a key role in the Exodus, and brought down the Two Stone Tablets from God. (See: A biography of Moses and Joshua)
  • The forty years in the Wilderness were 1312-1272 BCE.
Era of Joshua:
  • The Israelites crossed the Jordan into Canaan, 1272 BCE. Yehoshua (Joshua, died 1244 BCE), leader after Moses, led the conquest of Canaan. His period of leadership was 1272-1244 BCE.


Era of the Judges: (See also: Who were the Judges?) The era of the Judges was 1244-879 BCE. Here are some of the prominent Judges:

  • Devorah became leader in 1107 BCE. She was a female Torah-sage and Judge who led a miraculous victory over a Canaanite king (Judges ch.4-5).
  • Gideon became Judge in 1067 BCE. He led a miraculous victory over the Midianites (Judges ch.6-8).
  • Yiphtach (Jephthah) became leader in 982 BCE. He led a miraculous victory over the Ammonites (Judges ch.11).
  • Shimshon (Samson) became leader in 951 BCE. This Judge had unequaled strength and subdued the Philistines for many years (Judges ch.13-15).
  • Shmuel (Samuel) became leader in 890 BCE. He marked the transition from Judges to Kings. (See: A biography of Samuel and King David)


Era of the Kings: The era of the Kings lasted until the destruction of the First Temple in 422 BCE. (See also:Who were the Kings?) Here are some of the prominent kings, prophets and events:

  • Shaul (Saul), died 876 BCE, was first of the Kings. 1 Samuel ch.8-31.
  • King David reigned 40 years, from 876 BCE.
  • The building of the First Temple commenced in 832 BCE, by King Solomon, who reigned 40 years. See 1 Kings ch.6-8. The First Temple stood for 410 years.
  • Yerav'am ben Nevat (Jeroboam) took power in 796 BCE. He split the Ten Tribes (the Northern Kingdom of Israel) away from the southern Tribes (the Southern Kingdom) of Judah and Benjamin (1 Kings ch.12). (See: Why did the Ten Tribes break away from Judah?)
  • Eliyahu (Elijah), 8th century BCE, famous prophet. See 1 Kings ch.17 until 2 Kings ch.2.
  • Yeshayahu (Isaiah), best-known of the Prophets, began his prophecies in 619 BCE. (See: What was the role of the Prophets?)
  • Exile of the Ten Tribes by the Assyrians to points unknown, in 555 BCE. (See: Where are the Ten Tribes?)
  • Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) began his prophecies in 463 BCE. Warned about the impending Destruction.
  • Yechezkel (Ezekiel) prophesied, 429 BCE.
  • Destruction of the First Temple, in 422 BCE.


Era of the Babylonian Exile (422-352 BCE):

  • Daniel interpreted Nebuchadnezzar's dream in 421 BCE.
  • Zerubavel led the Jewish return to Israel (Judea) in 371 BCE, after King Cyrus of Persia permitted it. 18 years later, another wave of Jews returned with Ezra, while Nehemiah oversaw the rebuilding of the walls.
  • The events of Purim (Scroll of Esther) were in 355 BCE. (See: More about Esther)


Second Temple Era (352 BCE-68 CE):

  • Building of the Second Temple, 352 BCE. The Second Temple stood for 420 years. Soon after its construction, prophecy ceased.
  • Anshei Knesset HaGedolah - The Men of the Great Assembly. This Sanhedrin (high court of sages) sealed the canon of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible). (See: The history of the Hebrew Bible)
  • Alexander the Great, 313 BCE.
  • Shimon HaTzadik died in 273 BCE. One of the early sages.
  • Writing of the Septuagint, in 246 BCE.
  • The revolt of Mattityahu the Chashmona'i (Hasmonean), against the Syrian-Greeks, in 168 BCE.
  • The miracle of Hanukkah, 165 BCE. (See: more about Hanukkah)
  • Sh'lomit (Queen Salome) ruled 73-64 BCE. A brief period of peace in the turbulent Second Temple era.
  • The Romans gained control of Judea in 61 BCE.
  • Hillel, died 8 BCE. A beloved sage, famous for his humility.
  • Agrippa I (grandson of Herod) ruled, 21 CE (= "Common Era"). A rare instance of a benign Roman ruler. Not to be confused with the wicked Agrippa II, who began ruling 35 years later.
  • Christianity started spreading around this time, but not among the Jews. (See: Why the Jews didn't accept Jesus)
  • Destruction of the Second Temple, 68 CE. (See: Destruction and diaspora)


Era of the Mishna and Talmud-sages:

  • Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai, died 74 CE, gained the favor of Vespasian and managed to rescue a number of leading Torah-sages and brought them to the yeshiva (Torah-academy) in Yavneh. (See:What Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai did for Judaism)
  • Betar fell, and Bar Kochba's revolt ended in tragedy, 133 CE.
  • Rabbi Akiva, died 134 CE, was a leading Torah-sage throughout the Roman upheavals.
  • Rabbi Judah Hanassi, died 188 CE, completed the redaction of the Mishna (Oral Law), based on ancient tradition.
  • Rav (Rabbi Abba Aricha) left Israel and settled in Babylonia, 219 CE. Founded the yeshiva (Torah academy) of Sura. Died 247 CE.
  • Rabbi Yochanan was the leading Talmudic authority, 254 CE. Redacted the Jerusalem Talmud.
  • Rabbi Yehudah was the leading Talmudic authority, 298 CE. Disciple of Rav.
  • Abayei and Rava were the leading Talmudic authorities, 325 CE. These two participated in the redaction of the Babylonian Talmud.
  • Rav (Rabbi) Ashi was the leading Talmudic authority, 392 CE.
  • Final redaction of the Talmud, 475 CE. It was put in writing 25 years later.


Era of the Geonim (Torah-leaders in Babylonia):

  • The yeshiva of Pumbeditha was reopened (after Persian persecutions), 589 CE. Era of the Geonim begins.
  • The yeshiva of Sura was reopened, 609 CE.
  • Rabbi Yitzchak was the last Gaon (sage) of Neharde'a (Firuz-Shabur). 636 CE.
  • Rabbi Achai Gaon left Bavel (Iraq) for Israel, 755 CE.
  • The Halakhot Gedolot, an early codex of halakha (Torah laws), was written at this time. 759 CE.
  • Rabbi Amram (who put the Siddur [prayerbook] in writing), became Gaon (Torah-leader) of Sura. 858 CE.
  • Rabbi Saadya (882-942) was appointed Gaon of Sura, 928 CE. He led opposition against the breakaway Karaites. (See: The Karaites and other ancient groups)
  • Four sages were taken hostage and ransomed at around this time, 955 CE. This event contributed to the spread of Torah-learning to lands other than Babylonia.
  • Rabbi Sherira (906-1006) became Gaon of Pumbedita, 968 CE.
  • Rabbi Hai Gaon (939-1038), last of the leading Babylonian Torah sages.


European Jewry:

  • Rabbi Gershom Me'or HaGolah (c.960-1040) was the sage who decreed against Jewish polygamy.
  • Rabbi Isaac Al-Fasi (1013-1103) was the author of a major compendium of Halakha.
  • Rashi (Rabbi Shelomo Yitzchaki, 1040-1105), author of the greatest of the Talmud commentaries.
  • First Crusade, 1096. First recorded blood libel, 1144.
  • Rabbenu Tam (Rabbi Yaakov Tam, 1100-1170), a leading Talmudist. He was a grandson of Rashi.
  • The Rambam (Maimonides), 1135-1204, author of several major works in halakha and Jewish thought.
  • A massive burning of the Talmud by anti-Semites took place in Paris, 1242.
  • The Inquisition began to use torture, 1252.
  • The Ramban (Nachmanides), 1194-1270, author of a leading commentary on the Torah.
  • All Jews were expelled from England, 1290.
  • The Maharam (Rabbi Meir) of Rothenburg (1215-1293), last of the Tosafists (early Talmud-commentators).
  • The Ralbag (Rabbi Levi ben Gershom), 1288-1344, author of a commentary on the Bible.
  • Rabbi Nissim (1320-1376), and other Torah-scholars in Spain, were imprisoned. 1367.
  • The expulsion of Jews from France, 1394.
  • Rabbi Yosef Albo (1380-1444) was in a forced debate with Christians, 1413.
  • The invention of printing, 1440s.
  • Rabbi Ovadya Bertinura (1445-1515), Rabbi in Yerushalayim (Jerusalem) from 1488, author of the leading commentary on the Mishna.
  • Jews expelled from Spain and Sicily, 1492.
  • Rabbi Yitzchak Abarbanel (1437-1508), Rabbi in Naples from 1493. Author of a book on Jewish thought.
  • All Jews were expelled from Portugal, 1496.
  • The Turks (Ottoman Empire) conquered the land of Israel, 1516.
  • Rabbi Joseph Caro (1488-1575) published the Shulchan Arukh, a leading text of Jewish law, in 1566.


Later Rabbis and events:

  • Rabbi Isaac Luria (1534-1572), was a leading kabbalist.
  • The Maharal (Rabbi Loewe), 1512-1609, Rabbi in Prague from 1573. Maker of the legendary Golem.
  • Rabbi Shmuel Eidels (1555-1631), Rabbi in Lublin from 1614, author of a leading Talmud commentary.
  • Rabbi Yoel Sirkes (1561-1640), author of a major commentary on the Shulchan Arukh.
  • Rabbi Shabsei Cohen (1621-1662) and Rabbi David Halevi (1586-1667) publish leading commentaries on the Shulchan Arukh in 1646.
  • Chmielnicki massacres, 1648-9.
  • Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto (1707-1746), author of a famous text on piety.
  • Rabbi Israel Ba'al Shem Tov (1700-1760), founder of modern Hassidism.
  • The Pale of Jewish Settlement was established in Russia, 1791.
  • The Vilna Gaon (Rabbi Eliyahu of Vilna, 1720-1797), famous Talmudist.
  • Rabbi Chaim Yosef David Azulai (1724-1806), sage and biliographer.
  • Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (1772-1810), charismatic pietist and Hassidic leader.
  • Rabbi Yisrael Salanter (1810-1883), founder of the modern Mussar movement.
  • Rabbi Meir Malbim (1809-1879), opponent of the secularists (Haskalah), authored a major commentary on the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible).
  • Rabbi Israel Meir Kohen (Chafetz Chaim), 1838-1933, beloved pietist and Talmudist.
  • Wave of Russian pogroms begins, 1881.
  • Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried (1804-1886), author of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch.
  • Rabbi Abraham Karelitz (Chazon Ish), 1878-1953, leading Torah sage in Israel from 1933.
  • Germany started World War II, and mass killing of 6 million Jews, 1939.
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Judaism
Historical Figures

What is a historical event for judaism?

All of the dates and information provided below are based on the Jewish Torah, Talmud and oral tradition. Note that many hundreds of names and dates have been omitted for the purpose of brevity, and descriptions have been kept to a minimum. See the highlighted Related Links for more complete detail.
Era of the Patriarchs:

  • Avraham, founder of Jewish belief, born 1812 BCE (= "Before the Common Era"). Abraham founded the tradition of monotheism, which is the belief in One God. (See: A biography of Abraham)
  • Yitzchak (Isaac), second of the Avot (Patriarchs), born 1712 BCE. (See: A biography of Isaac, Jacob and Joseph)
  • Yaakov (Jacob), third of the three Patriarchs, born 1652 BCE.
Era of the sojourn in Egypt:
  • Yosef (Joseph), born 1563 BCE, became Viceroy of Egypt.
  • The sojourn in Egypt was 1522-1312 BCE. The enslavement in Egypt began in 1428 BCE.

Moses and Joshua:
  • Moshe (Moses) was born in 1392 BCE. He played a key role in the Exodus, and brought down the Two Stone Tablets from God. (See: A biography of Moses and Joshua)
  • The forty years in the Wilderness were 1312-1272 BCE.
Era of Joshua:
  • The Israelites crossed the Jordan into Canaan, 1272 BCE. Yehoshua (Joshua, died 1244 BCE), leader after Moses, led the conquest of Canaan. His period of leadership was 1272-1244 BCE.


Era of the Judges: (See also: Who were the Judges?) The era of the Judges was 1244-879 BCE. Here are some of the prominent Judges:

  • Devorah became leader in 1107 BCE. She was a female Torah-sage and Judge who led a miraculous victory over a Canaanite king (Judges ch.4-5).
  • Gideon became Judge in 1067 BCE. He led a miraculous victory over the Midianites (Judges ch.6-8).
  • Yiphtach (Jephthah) became leader in 982 BCE. He led a miraculous victory over the Ammonites (Judges ch.11).
  • Shimshon (Samson) became leader in 951 BCE. This Judge had unequaled strength and subdued the Philistines for many years (Judges ch.13-15).
  • Shmuel (Samuel) became leader in 890 BCE. He marked the transition from Judges to Kings. (See: A biography of Samuel and King David)


Era of the Kings: The era of the Kings lasted until the destruction of the First Temple in 422 BCE. (See also:Who were the Kings?) Here are some of the prominent kings, prophets and events:

  • Shaul (Saul), died 876 BCE, was first of the Kings. 1 Samuel ch.8-31.
  • King David reigned 40 years, from 876 BCE.
  • The building of the First Temple commenced in 832 BCE, by King Solomon, who reigned 40 years. See 1 Kings ch.6-8. The First Temple stood for 410 years.
  • Yerav'am ben Nevat (Jeroboam) took power in 796 BCE. He split the Ten Tribes (the Northern Kingdom of Israel) away from the southern Tribes (the Southern Kingdom) of Judah and Benjamin (1 Kings ch.12). (See: Why did the Ten Tribes break away from Judah?)
  • Eliyahu (Elijah), 8th century BCE, famous prophet. See 1 Kings ch.17 until 2 Kings ch.2.
  • Yeshayahu (Isaiah), best-known of the Prophets, began his prophecies in 619 BCE. (See: What was the role of the Prophets?)
  • Exile of the Ten Tribes by the Assyrians to points unknown, in 555 BCE. (See: Where are the Ten Tribes?)
  • Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) began his prophecies in 463 BCE. Warned about the impending Destruction.
  • Yechezkel (Ezekiel) prophesied, 429 BCE.
  • Destruction of the First Temple, in 422 BCE.


Era of the Babylonian Exile (422-352 BCE):

  • Daniel interpreted Nebuchadnezzar's dream in 421 BCE.
  • Zerubavel led the Jewish return to Israel (Judea) in 371 BCE, after King Cyrus of Persia permitted it. 18 years later, another wave of Jews returned with Ezra, while Nehemiah oversaw the rebuilding of the walls.
  • The events of Purim (Scroll of Esther) were in 355 BCE. (See: More about Esther)


Second Temple Era (352 BCE-68 CE):

  • Building of the Second Temple, 352 BCE. The Second Temple stood for 420 years. Soon after its construction, prophecy ceased.
  • Anshei Knesset HaGedolah - The Men of the Great Assembly. This Sanhedrin (high court of sages) sealed the canon of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible). (See: The history of the Hebrew Bible)
  • Alexander the Great, 313 BCE.
  • Shimon HaTzadik died in 273 BCE. One of the early sages.
  • Writing of the Septuagint, in 246 BCE.
  • The revolt of Mattityahu the Chashmona'i (Hasmonean), against the Syrian-Greeks, in 168 BCE.
  • The miracle of Hanukkah, 165 BCE. (See: more about Hanukkah)
  • Sh'lomit (Queen Salome) ruled 73-64 BCE. A brief period of peace in the turbulent Second Temple era.
  • The Romans gained control of Judea in 61 BCE.
  • Hillel, died 8 BCE. A beloved sage, famous for his humility.
  • Agrippa I (grandson of Herod) ruled, 21 CE (= "Common Era"). A rare instance of a benign Roman ruler. Not to be confused with the wicked Agrippa II, who began ruling 35 years later.
  • Christianity started spreading around this time, but not among the Jews. (See: Why the Jews didn't accept Jesus)
  • Destruction of the Second Temple, 68 CE. (See: Destruction and diaspora)


Era of the Mishna and Talmud-sages:

  • Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai, died 74 CE, gained the favor of Vespasian and managed to rescue a number of leading Torah-sages and brought them to the yeshiva (Torah-academy) in Yavneh. (See:What Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai did for Judaism)
  • Betar fell, and Bar Kochba's revolt ended in tragedy, 133 CE.
  • Rabbi Akiva, died 134 CE, was a leading Torah-sage throughout the Roman upheavals.
  • Rabbi Judah Hanassi, died 188 CE, completed the redaction of the Mishna (Oral Law), based on ancient tradition.
  • Rav (Rabbi Abba Aricha) left Israel and settled in Babylonia, 219 CE. Founded the yeshiva (Torah academy) of Sura. Died 247 CE.
  • Rabbi Yochanan was the leading Talmudic authority, 254 CE. Redacted the Jerusalem Talmud.
  • Rabbi Yehudah was the leading Talmudic authority, 298 CE. Disciple of Rav.
  • Abayei and Rava were the leading Talmudic authorities, 325 CE. These two participated in the redaction of the Babylonian Talmud.
  • Rav (Rabbi) Ashi was the leading Talmudic authority, 392 CE.
  • Final redaction of the Talmud, 475 CE. It was put in writing 25 years later.


Era of the Geonim (Torah-leaders in Babylonia):

  • The yeshiva of Pumbeditha was reopened (after Persian persecutions), 589 CE. Era of the Geonim begins.
  • The yeshiva of Sura was reopened, 609 CE.
  • Rabbi Yitzchak was the last Gaon (sage) of Neharde'a (Firuz-Shabur). 636 CE.
  • Rabbi Achai Gaon left Bavel (Iraq) for Israel, 755 CE.
  • The Halakhot Gedolot, an early codex of halakha (Torah laws), was written at this time. 759 CE.
  • Rabbi Amram (who put the Siddur [prayerbook] in writing), became Gaon (Torah-leader) of Sura. 858 CE.
  • Rabbi Saadya (882-942) was appointed Gaon of Sura, 928 CE. He led opposition against the breakaway Karaites. (See: The Karaites and other ancient groups)
  • Four sages were taken hostage and ransomed at around this time, 955 CE. This event contributed to the spread of Torah-learning to lands other than Babylonia.
  • Rabbi Sherira (906-1006) became Gaon of Pumbedita, 968 CE.
  • Rabbi Hai Gaon (939-1038), last of the leading Babylonian Torah sages.


European Jewry:

  • Rabbi Gershom Me'or HaGolah (c.960-1040) was the sage who decreed against Jewish polygamy.
  • Rabbi Isaac Al-Fasi (1013-1103) was the author of a major compendium of Halakha.
  • Rashi (Rabbi Shelomo Yitzchaki, 1040-1105), author of the greatest of the Talmud commentaries.
  • First Crusade, 1096. First recorded blood libel, 1144.
  • Rabbenu Tam (Rabbi Yaakov Tam, 1100-1170), a leading Talmudist. He was a grandson of Rashi.
  • The Rambam (Maimonides), 1135-1204, author of several major works in halakha and Jewish thought.
  • A massive burning of the Talmud by anti-Semites took place in Paris, 1242.
  • The Inquisition began to use torture, 1252.
  • The Ramban (Nachmanides), 1194-1270, author of a leading commentary on the Torah.
  • All Jews were expelled from England, 1290.
  • The Maharam (Rabbi Meir) of Rothenburg (1215-1293), last of the Tosafists (early Talmud-commentators).
  • The Ralbag (Rabbi Levi ben Gershom), 1288-1344, author of a commentary on the Bible.
  • Rabbi Nissim (1320-1376), and other Torah-scholars in Spain, were imprisoned. 1367.
  • The expulsion of Jews from France, 1394.
  • Rabbi Yosef Albo (1380-1444) was in a forced debate with Christians, 1413.
  • The invention of printing, 1440s.
  • Rabbi Ovadya Bertinura (1445-1515), Rabbi in Yerushalayim (Jerusalem) from 1488, author of the leading commentary on the Mishna.
  • Jews expelled from Spain and Sicily, 1492.
  • Rabbi Yitzchak Abarbanel (1437-1508), Rabbi in Naples from 1493. Author of a book on Jewish thought.
  • All Jews were expelled from Portugal, 1496.
  • The Turks (Ottoman Empire) conquered the land of Israel, 1516.
  • Rabbi Joseph Caro (1488-1575) published the Shulchan Arukh, a leading text of Jewish law, in 1566.


Later Rabbis and events:

  • Rabbi Isaac Luria (1534-1572), was a leading kabbalist.
  • The Maharal (Rabbi Loewe), 1512-1609, Rabbi in Prague from 1573. Maker of the legendary Golem.
  • Rabbi Shmuel Eidels (1555-1631), Rabbi in Lublin from 1614, author of a leading Talmud commentary.
  • Rabbi Yoel Sirkes (1561-1640), author of a major commentary on the Shulchan Arukh.
  • Rabbi Shabsei Cohen (1621-1662) and Rabbi David Halevi (1586-1667) publish leading commentaries on the Shulchan Arukh in 1646.
  • Chmielnicki massacres, 1648-9.
  • Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto (1707-1746), author of a famous text on piety.
  • Rabbi Israel Ba'al Shem Tov (1700-1760), founder of modern Hassidism.
  • The Pale of Jewish Settlement was established in Russia, 1791.
  • The Vilna Gaon (Rabbi Eliyahu of Vilna, 1720-1797), famous Talmudist.
  • Rabbi Chaim Yosef David Azulai (1724-1806), sage and biliographer.
  • Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (1772-1810), charismatic pietist and Hassidic leader.
  • Rabbi Yisrael Salanter (1810-1883), founder of the modern Mussar movement.
  • Rabbi Meir Malbim (1809-1879), opponent of the secularists (Haskalah), authored a major commentary on the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible).
  • Rabbi Israel Meir Kohen (Chafetz Chaim), 1838-1933, beloved pietist and Talmudist.
  • Wave of Russian pogroms begins, 1881.
  • Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried (1804-1886), author of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch.
  • Rabbi Abraham Karelitz (Chazon Ish), 1878-1953, leading Torah sage in Israel from 1933.
  • Germany started World War II, and mass killing of 6 million Jews, 1939.
161718
History of the United States
Historical Figures

What did Johnny Appleseed do to become famous?

Johnny Appleseed (born as "John Chapman") became an American legend due to his generous nature, great leadershipin conservation, and for having introduced the apple treethroughout the United States Midwest.

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Historical Figures

Are there any history changing veterinarians?

The governor of Georgia, Sonny Perdue, is a veterinarian.

353637
Relationships
Sentence and Word Structure
Pangaea Supercontinent
Historical Figures

What happened to Joann Hoffa?

Maiden name: Josephine Poszywak (laundry worker, m. 24-Sep-1936, one daughter, one son)

Daughter: Barbara Ann Crancer (b. 1938)

Son:James P. Hoffa (b. 1941)

wife of Jimmy Hoffa

353637
History, Politics & Society
My Chemical Romance
James Madison
Historical Figures

What were the names frank James children?

frank James only child's name?Robert Franklin James
353637
Historical Figures

When and where did jimmy hoffa disappear in which state and year?

1975 in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. It was from a restaurant called Red Fox. He was last seen getting into a car with several other men.

012
Malaysia
Historical Figures

Who were the sultans of Malaysia and which year did they assume power?

There have been a total 12 Sultans in Malaysia. The current Sultan is the only Sultan to have reigned twice and he is the 14th Sultan. The Sultans and their respective years of reign are given below:

1.Tuanku Abdul Rahman-31-07-1957 - 01-04-1960 (2 years)

2.Sultan Hisamuddin Alam Shah-14-04-1960 - 01-09-1960 (4 months)

3.Tuanku Syed Putra-21-09-1960 - 20-09-1965 (5 years)

4.Sultan Ismail Nasiruddin Shah-21-09-1965 - 20-09-1970 (5 years)

5.Tuanku Abdul Halim-21-09-1970 - 20-09-1975 (5 years)

6.Sultan Yahya Petra-21-09-1975 - 29-03-1979 (4 years)

7.Sultan Ahmad Shah Al-Mustain Billah-29-03-1979 - 25-04-1984 (5 years)

8.Sultan Iskandar-26-04-1984 - 25-04-1989 (5 years)

9.Sultan Azlan Muhibbuddin Shah-26-04-1989 - 25-04-1994 (5 years)

10.Tuanku Jaafar-26-04-1994 - 25-04-1999 (5 years)

11.Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz-26-04-1999 - 21-11-2001 (2 years)

12.Tuanku Syed Sirajuddin-13-12- 2001 - 12-12-2006 (5 years)

13.Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin-13-12-2006 - 12-12-2011 (5 years)

14.Tuanku Abdul Halim-13-12- 2011 - present

171819
Britain in WW2
Boy Scouts
Girl Guides and Girl Scouts
Historical Figures

Who was Robert Baden-Powell's wife?

Olave St. Clair Soames, now known as Olave Baden-Powell, was Robert Baden-Powell's wife.

313233
Historical Figures
Cowboys and Cowgirls

Where was buffalo bill born?

Iowa

313233
Rosa Parks
Civil Rights Leaders
Historical Figures

What did Rosa Parks do that makes her a historical figure?

Started the bus boycott

313233
Translations
Name Origins
Demographics
Historical Figures

How many people in the world are named Kelsey?

Answer:about one hundred thousand people in the world are called kelsey =)
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