Historical Figures

Historical figures are the various individuals throughout time that have made their mark. Some have done this through a series of great acts. Some have done just one thing, but they made a huge impact through their choice.

2,033 Questions
Famous People
History of India
Historical Figures

Who is regarded greater in Indian History Swami Dayanand or Swami Vivekanand?

Both Swami Dayanand Saraswati and Swami Vivekanand have a great place in the Indian rather World History in the fields of spirituality and philosophy. While Swami Dayanand (1824-1883) was a Revolutionary Reformer and a Vedic Sanskrit Scholar, Swami Vivekanand was a disciple of Ramakrishna who appeared on the Indian scene much later (1863-1902), was a philosopher who spoke for Hinduism and worked for infusing energy into the youth of India. Dayanand had sown the seeds for the Indian freedom (Swarajya) in 1876 which were furthered by Naroaji, Tilak, Gandhi and millions of freedom fighters and revolutionaries by their sacrifices. And as such viewed from historical angles and the contribution to the Nation, Swami Dayanand is regarded as senior or greater and is regarded as Rashpitamah.

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Judaism
History of Judaism
Historical Figures

What are some important Jewish historical names dates and events?

All of the dates and information provided below are based on the Jewish Torah, Talmud and oral tradition. Note that many hundreds of names and dates have been omitted for the sake of brevity. Early Era:

  • Terah, Abraham's father was born, 1882 BCE.
Era of the Patriarchs:
  • Avraham, founder of Jewish belief, born 1812 BCE (= "Before the Common Era"). Abraham founded the tradition of monotheism, which is the belief in One God.
  • Yitzchak (Isaac), second of the Avot (Patriarchs), born 1712 BCE.
  • Yaakov (Jacob), third of the three Patriarchs, born 1652 BCE.
Era of the sojourn in Egypt:
  • Yosef (Joseph), born 1563 BCE, became Viceroy of Egypt.
  • The sojourn in Egypt was 1522-1312 BCE. The enslavement in Egypt began in 1428 BCE.
Era of Moses and Joshua:
  • Moshe (Moses) was born in 1392 BCE. He played a key role in the Exodus, and brought down the Two Stone Tablets from God.
  • The forty years in the Wilderness were 1312-1272 BCE.
  • The Israelites crossed the Jordan into Canaan, 1272 BCE. Yehoshua (Joshua, died 1244 BCE), leader after Moses, led the conquest of Canaan. His period of leadership was 1272-1244 BCE.
Era of the Judges: The era of the Judges was 1244-879 BCE. Here are some of the prominent Judges:
  • Devorah became leader in 1107 BCE. She was a female Torah-sage and Judge who led a miraculous victory over a Canaanite king (Judges ch.4-5).
  • Gideon became Judge in 1067 BCE. He led a miraculous victory over the Midianites (Judges ch.6-8).
  • Yiphtach (Jephthah) became leader in 982 BCE. He led a miraculous victory over the Ammonites (Judges ch.11).
  • Shimshon (Samson) became leader in 951 BCE. This Judge had unequaled strength and subdued the Philistines for many years (Judges ch.13-15).
  • Shmuel (Samuel) became leader in 890 BCE. He marked the transition from Judges to Kings.
  • The Mishkan (Tabernacle) at Shiloh is overrun by the Philistines, 888 BCE.
Era of the Kings: The era of the Kings lasted until the destruction of the First Temple in 422 BCE.

Here are some of the prominent kings, prophets and events:

  • Shaul (Saul), died 876 BCE, was first of the Kings. 1 Samuel ch.8-31.
  • King David reigned 40 years, from 876 BCE.
  • The building of the First Temple commenced in 832 BCE, by King Solomon, who reigned 40 years. See 1 Kings ch.6-8. The First Temple stood for 410 years.
  • Yerav'am (Jeroboam) took power in 796 BCE. He split the Ten Tribes (the Northern Kingdom of Israel) away from the Southern Kingdom of Judah and Benjamin (1 Kings ch.12).
  • Eliyahu (Elijah), 8th century BCE, famous prophet. See 1 Kings ch.17 until 2 Kings ch.2.
  • Yeshayahu (Isaiah), best-known of the Prophets, began his prophecies in 619 BCE.
  • Exile of the Ten Tribes by the Assyrians to points presently unknown, in 555 BCE.
  • Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) began his prophecies in 463 BCE. Warned about the impending Destruction.
  • Yechezkel (Ezekiel) prophesied, 429 BCE.
Era of the Babylonian Exile (422-352 BCE):
  • Destruction of the First Temple, in 422 BCE.
  • Daniel interpreted Nebuchadnezzar's dream in 422 BCE.
  • Zerubavel led the Jewish return to Israel (Judea) in 371 BCE, after King Cyrus of Persia permitted it. 18 years later, another wave of Jews returned with Ezra, while Nehemiah oversaw the rebuilding of Jerusalem's walls.
  • The events of Purim (Scroll of Esther) were in 355 BCE.
  • Mordecai institutes the annual Purim celebration, 354 BCE.
Second Temple Era (352 BCE-68 CE):
  • Building of the Second Temple, 352 BCE. The Second Temple stood for 420 years. Soon after its construction, prophecy ceased.
  • Anshei Knesset HaGedolah - The Men of the Great Assembly. This Sanhedrin (high court of sages) sealed the canon of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible).
  • Shimon HaTzadik died in 273 BCE. One of the early sages.
  • Writing of the Septuagint, in 246 BCE.
  • The revolt of Mattityahu the Chashmona'i (Hasmonean), against the Syrian-Greeks, in 168 BCE.
  • The miracle of Hanukkah, 165 BCE.
  • Sh'lomit (Queen Salome) ruled 73-64 BCE. A brief period of peace in the turbulent Second Temple era.
  • The Romans gained control of Judea in 61 BCE.
  • Hillel, died 8 BCE. A beloved sage, famous for his humility.
  • Agrippa I (grandson of Herod) ruled, 21 CE (= "Common Era"). A rare instance of a benign Roman ruler. Not to be confused with the wicked Agrippa II, who began ruling 35 years later.
  • Christianity started spreading around this time, but not among the Jews.
  • Destruction of the Second Temple, 68 CE.
  • Fall of Masada, 73 CE.
Era of the Mishna and Talmud-sages:
  • Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai, died 74 CE, gained the favor of Vespasian and managed to rescue a number of leading Torah-sages and brought them to the yeshiva (Torah-academy) in Yavneh.
  • Betar fell, and Bar Kochba's revolt ended in tragedy, 133 CE.
  • Rabbi Akiva, died 134 CE, was a leading Torah-sage throughout the Roman upheavals.
  • Rabbi Judah Hanassi, died 188 CE, completed the collation of the Mishna (Oral Law), based on ancient tradition.
  • Rav (Rabbi Abba Aricha) left Israel and settled in Babylonia, from 219 CE. Founded the yeshiva (Torah academy) of Sura. Died 247 CE.
  • Rabbi Yochanan was the leading Talmudic authority, from 254 CE. Collated the Jerusalem Talmud.
  • Rabbi Yehudah was the leading Talmudic authority, from 298 CE. Disciple of Rav.
  • Abayei and Rava were the leading Talmudic authorities, from 325 CE. These two participated in the collation of the Babylonian Talmud.
  • Rav (Rabbi) Ashi was the leading Talmudic authority, from 392 CE.
  • End of the collation of the Talmud, 475 CE. It was put in writing 25 years later.
Era of the Geonim (Torah-leaders in Babylonia):
  • The yeshiva of Pumbeditha was reopened (after Persian persecutions), 589 CE. Era of the Geonim begins.
  • The yeshiva of Sura was reopened, 609 CE.
  • Rabbi Yitzchak was the last Gaon (sage) of Neharde'a (Firuz-Shabur). 636 CE.
  • Rabbi Achai Gaon left Bavel (Iraq) for Israel, 755 CE.
  • The Halakhot Gedolot, an early codex of halakha (Torah laws), was written at this time. 759 CE.
  • Rabbi Amram (who put the Siddur [prayerbook] in writing), became Gaon (Torah-leader) of Sura in 858 CE.
  • Rabbi Saadya (882-942) was appointed Gaon of Sura, from 928 CE. He led opposition against the breakaway Karaites.
  • Four sages were taken hostage and ransomed at around this time, 955 CE. This event contributed to the spread of Torah-learning to lands other than Babylonia.
  • Rabbi Sherira (906-1006) became Gaon of Pumbedita, from 968 CE.
  • Rabbi Hai Gaon (939-1038), last of the leading Babylonian Torah sages.
European Jewry:
  • Rabbi Gershom Me'or HaGolah (c.960-1040) was the sage who decreed against Jewish polygamy.
  • Rabbi Isaac Al-Fasi (1013-1103) was the author of a major compendium of Halakha.
  • Rashi (Rabbi Shelomo Yitzchaki, 1040-1105), author of the greatest of the Talmud commentaries.
  • First Crusade, 1096. First recorded blood libel, 1144.
  • Rabbenu Tam (Rabbi Yaakov Tam, 1100-1170), a leading Talmudist. He was a grandson of Rashi.
  • The Rambam (Maimonides), 1135-1204, author of several major works in halakha and Jewish thought.
  • A massive burning of the Talmud by anti-Semites took place in Paris, 1242.
  • The Inquisition began to use torture, 1252.
  • The Ramban (Nachmanides), 1194-1270, author of a leading commentary on the Torah.
  • All Jews were expelled from England, 1290.
  • The Maharam (Rabbi Meir) of Rothenburg (1215-1293), last of the Tosafists (early Talmud-commentators).
  • The Ralbag (Rabbi Levi ben Gershom), 1288-1344, author of a commentary on the Bible.
  • Rabbi Nissim (1320-1376), and other Torah-scholars in Spain, were imprisoned. 1367.
  • The expulsion of Jews from France, 1394.
  • Rabbi Yosef Albo (1380-1444) was in a forced debate with Christians, 1413.
  • The invention of printing, 1440s.
  • Rabbi Ovadya Bertinura (1445-1515), Rabbi in Yerushalayim (Jerusalem) from 1488, author of the leading commentary on the Mishna.
  • Jews expelled from Spain and Sicily, 1492.
  • Rabbi Yitzchak Abarbanel (1437-1508), Rabbi in Naples from 1493. Author of a book on Jewish thought.
  • All Jews were expelled from Portugal, 1496.
  • The Turks (Ottoman Empire) conquered the land of Israel, 1516.
  • Rabbi Joseph Caro (1488-1575) published the Shulchan Arukh, a leading text of Jewish law, in 1566.
Later Rabbis and events:
  • Rabbi Isaac Luria (1534-1572), was a leading kabbalist.
  • The Maharal (Rabbi Loewe), 1512-1609, Rabbi in Prague from 1573. Maker of the legendary Golem.
  • Rabbi Shmuel Eidels (1555-1631), Rabbi in Lublin from 1614, author of a leading Talmud commentary.
  • Rabbi Yoel Sirkes (1561-1640), author of a major commentary on the Shulchan Arukh.
  • Rabbi Shabsei Cohen (1621-1662) and Rabbi David Halevi (1586-1667) publish leading commentaries on the Shulchan Arukh in 1646.
  • Chmielnicki massacres, 1648-9.
  • Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto (1707-1746), author of a famous text on piety.
  • Rabbi Israel Ba'al Shem Tov (1700-1760), founder of modern Hassidism.
  • The Pale of Jewish Settlement was established in Russia, 1791.
  • The Vilna Gaon (Rabbi Eliyahu of Vilna, 1720-1797), famous Talmudist.
  • Rabbi Chaim Yosef David Azulai (1724-1806), sage and biliographer.
  • Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (1772-1810), charismatic pietist and Hassidic leader.
  • Rabbi Yisrael Salanter (1810-1883), founder of the modern Mussar movement.
  • Rabbi Meir Malbim (1809-1879), opponent of the secularists (Haskalah), authored a major commentary on the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible).
  • Rabbi Israel Meir Kohen (Chafetz Chaim), 1838-1933, beloved pietist and Talmudist.
  • Wave of Russian pogroms begins, 1881.
  • Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried (1804-1886), author of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch.
  • Rabbi Abraham Karelitz (Chazon Ish), 1878-1953, leading Torah sage in Israel from 1933.
  • Germany started World War II, and mass killing of 6 million Jews, 1939.
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Historical Figures

Who is an ignoble historical figure?

Adolf Hitler

197198199
Literature and Language
Historical Figures

Who is Jean Erasmus?

One gay soldier, Jean Erasmus, was chemically castrated by Dr Levin at Bloemfontein psychiatric hospital in 1980.

Before he committed suicide last year, Erasmus recorded a tape detailing the broader abuse of homosexuals in the army, including how he was forced by his officers to participate in the gang rape of Angolan women, and how other gay soldiers were given hormone drugs.

"I am quite convinced that quite a few murders of gay people took place which we will never know of, and it was covered up. When people got trigger happy, gays were often the brunt of the bullet."

In practice, the army's treatment of gays was confused. Many found themselves in de facto "gay battalions", according to Mikki van Zyl, a researcher on the Aversion Project report.

"In Uppington, virtually the whole battalion was queer until some general decided this should be broken up. There was one in Grahamstown. There was another in Pretoria. For some of them, these were supportive environments," she said.

Some men joined the army specifically to get a sex change operation. But others were pressured into surgery by military psychologists after other methods failed. The army carried out as many as 50 sex change operations a year.

Lesbians were also offered surgery - one woman is among those left partially altered after the programme was shut down.

The Aversion Project report argues that the doctors concerned broke international law.

"Health workers in the [military] were expected to be loyal first to the state and its ideologies. It meant that some doctors flagrantly ignored terms from the Geneva convention and Tokyo declaration, and certainly showed no accountability to the national professional councils, nor best current practices. The stage was set for human rights abuses of patients under the care of such doctors."

Ms van Zyl says that while the army as an institution should be held accountable, Dr Levin has particular responsibility.

"He left a trail of experiments. He worked in environments where he had captive subjects and he abused them," she said.

Dr Levin emigrated to Canada at about the time he was warned by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa that he would be named as an abuser of human rights.

Speaking to the Guardian from Canada, where he works at a teaching hospital, he said he left South Africa only because of the high crime rate, and denied the accusations against him.

"Nobody was given electric shock treatment by me. What we practised was aversion therapy. We caused slight, very slight, pain in the arm by contracting the muscles, using an electronic device," he said.

"Nobody was held against his or her will. We did not keep human guinea pigs, like Russian communists; we only had patients who wanted to be cured and were there voluntarily."

Copyright © Guardian Media Group PLC 2000

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US Civil War
Historical Figures

Where is general Custer's revolver?

205206207
Historical Figures

Where can you find facts and stories about John 'Liver-eating' Johnston?

Some contributions by WikiAnswers contributors: Here are a couple of bits of info about Liver-eating Johnson. Crow Killer: The Saga of Liver-Eating Johnson @ www.codywyomingnet.com: "The grave of Liver Eating Johnston was relocated to Old Trail Town on June 8, 1974. During his colorful career, Johnston, who was born in 1824 and died in 1900, had been a trapper, hunter, wood hawk, army scout, marshal, and Civil War veteran. In recent years he has become well known from the 1972 movie "Jeremiah Johnson," which was based on Johnston's life. Over 2,000 people attended the reburial service for Liver Eating Johnston at Old Trail Town; probably the largest burial service in the history of Wyoming." Consult the book "Crow-Killer: The Saga of Liver-eating Johnston" by Raymond W. Thorpe. Found the following on: http://www.huntershotsprings.com/updates/liver.html Also a fiction book called Mountain Man by Vardis Fisher. John Johnson's obituary: Feb. 10, 1900 -Died in California- "Liver-Eating" Johnson, the Noted Scout Is No More Red Lodge Picket: John Johnson, known the country over as "Liver-Eating" Johnson, died at the National Soldiers' Home at Santa Monica, Cal., on Sunday, Jan. 22, and thus came to an end the earthly career of a trail-blazer and intrepid pioneer whose heroic exploits on the western plains are inseparably connected with the early history of the commonwealth of Montana. See web site: JohnLiverEatingJohnston.com ________ See three recent articles that I have written:

"Perceptions of a Mountain Man: John "Jeremiah Liver-Eating" Johnston at Old Trail Town, Cody, Wyoming." The Rocky Mountain Fur Trade Journal v.1 (2007): 93-106. Published by the Museum of the Mountain Man, Pinedale, Wyoming. "The Abandoned Scout's Revenge: Origins of the Crow Killer Saga of Liver-Eating Johnson," Annals of Wyoming v. 78 n. 4 (Autumn 2006): 2-17. Published by the Wyoming Historical Society. "A Hawken Rifle and Bowie Knife of John 'Liver-Eating' Johnson," Arms & Armour: Journal of the Royal Armouries, v. 3 n. 2 (October 2006): 159-170. Published by the Royal Armouries, Leeds, England. Nathan E. Bender

University of Idaho

_________

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Judaism
Historical Figures

Who are some historical figures in judaism?

The Hebrew Bible talks of many mythological and legendary figures in the early history of the world. The most important of these include Adam, Abraham and Moses.

However, the earliest historical person was probably King David, although many scholars believe he was probably not so much a king as a local warlord with a tribal base near Jerusalem.

109110111
Religion & Spirituality
Historical Figures

Who are historical figures of Islam?

Islam has lots of Prophets if that is what you mean by historical figures and there are also lots of events. Allah does not specialize any of his messengers/Prophets but the last Prophet named Muhammed(peace be upon him) was known alot. Each Prophet has a special ability. For example, Dawud(PBUH) had an excellent voice. An event of Islam is Eid and this is celebrated after Ramadan. Ramadan is when us Muslims don't eat till sunset. We do this so we can feel the starvation of the poor and needy. Hajj is also just another wonderful event of Islam. Hajj actually includes a series of activities. First you do Ihram and Neea. Ihram is the certain clothes you wear and the procedure that you do to clean yourself. Comb your hair, shape the beard, trim your mustache, cut your nails.Take a bath with the intention of Ihram otherwise do wudu. Both should wear the flip-flops so that the middle bones of the upper part of the feet are not covered.If it is not makruh (undesirable) time, offer two rakahs of nafl for Ihram by covering your heads.Now uncover your head and declare your intention. It is assumed that you are performing Hajj al-Tammat'u in which Umrah is performed first as described later in the "Kinds of Hajj".Immediately after that utter the words of Talbiyah three times and as often afterwards as possible. If you don't remember it, you can say its translation in English or in any other language but Talbiah or its translation is pronounced in a loud voice by men and in a subdued voice by women.After this recite Darud Sharif and supplicate to Allah Almighty any du'a in Arabic or in your own language.After intention and Talbiyah, you are in the status of Ihram and from this time on you should not do acts that are forbidden in Ihram , for example, here are some of the things a muhrim must not do:

  • Cover head (men), cover face (women)
  • Cover the middle bone of the upper part of the feet (Both men and women))
  • Shave / cut hair
  • Cut nails
  • Wear perfume
  • Wear stitched clothing (men) / (Women can wear their ordinay clothes)
  • Hunting / killing

For male they wear two pieces of white cloth covering part of the breast and the lower body. For a female I hram is just the regular everyday clothes that they wear to Hajj. The next part is to Make Tawaf (circumvolution) around Kaaba, seven times while glorifying God

*Walk between Safa and Marwa seven times with occasional trotting, (Sa'i)

This completes the "Umrah" portion of the pilgrimage. The state of Ihram can be either broken or maintained at this point and before proceeding to Mountain Arafat. If the state of ihram is broken, a pilgrim must offer a sacrifice or fast a total of ten days, three of them must be during the pilgrimage (2:196).

(3) GOING TO ARAFAT

*Proceed to Arafat. (Going through or halting at Mena not a mandatory step)

*Stay in Arafat from Fajr till sunset

*Stay in any part of Arafat

*Glorify God, repeat supplication, repent and ask for forgiveness

(4) GOING TO MUZDALIFAH

*Leave for Muzdalifah after sunset

*Observe Night prayers as usual

*Pick up 21 pebbles

*Stay overnight and perform Fajr prayer

(5) PROCEED TO MINA

*Leave Muzdalifah for Mena in the morning

*Spend at least two days there

*On the first morning in Mina, offer an animal sacrifice

*Go to the three Jamarat stations and stone each with 7 pebbles while glorifying God

(6) FAREWELL TAWAF

*Return to Mecca and observe a farewell circumvolution (Tawaf) seven times around Kaaba

*Cut or shorten hair

*All Ihram restrictions are now lifted and Hajj is completed

There are many historical figures in Islam, they advanced in many fields including mathematics, science, religion, and many many more which helped the world come out of the dark ages into the modern era.

You can refer to the related links for more information.

muhammed, moses, Jesus, and Abraham... yes all of the 25 prophets from adam a.s. down to muhammad pbuh are historical figures of islam each of them have contributed to the propagation and establishment of islam and that is why every muslim individual should render love and respect to all these prophets, also the sahabatul kiram of prophet muhammad p.b.u.h., the tabiin, the tabit tabiin, the four madzhab and the ulamas who served islam, some of the historical events of islam are; the first revelation received by the holy prophet at cave of hira, israh wal mi'radz, hijrah, the migration of his sahabat to ethiopia, the battles that was fought by Rasulullah and his sahabat, the signing of the treaty of hudaibiya, the entry of the holy prophet and the muslim to makka and there are many, many more.

Prophet Mohammad (pbuh) Prophet Ibrahim (pbuh) Prophet Moses (pbuh) Prophet Noah (pbuh) Prophet Jesus (pbuh) Imam Ali

Mohammad, NOAH, Abraham, Moses, Jesus

Well there's a lot of historical events and figures in Islam. From the top of my head I can say:

Prophet Muhammad p.b.u.h. and his journeys to Mecca and Madina. Also his journeys to spread the religion of Islam. Omar bin Al Khatab, Ibn Magid...

Anyone, feel free to add more...I'm not so good with spelling in English the names.

109110111
African-American History
Historical Figures

How many siblings did Elijah McCoy have?

He was the third of 12 children.

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Judaism
Historical Figures

What are historical figures and events in Judaism Christianity and Islam?

For Judaism:

All of the dates and information provided below are based on the Jewish Torah, Talmud and oral tradition. Note that many hundreds of names and dates have been omitted for the purpose of brevity, and descriptions have been kept to a minimum. See the highlighted Related Links for more complete detail.Creation: 3760 BCE.

The Flood: 2104 BCE.

Era of the Patriarchs:

  • Avraham, founder of Jewish belief, born 1812 BCE (= "Before the Common Era"). Abraham founded the tradition of monotheism, which is the belief in One God. (See: A biography of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob)
  • Yitzchak (Isaac), second of the Avot (Patriarchs), born 1712 BCE.
  • Yaakov (Jacob), third of the three Patriarchs, born 1652 BCE.
Era of the sojourn in Egypt:
  • Yosef (Joseph), born 1563 BCE, became Viceroy of Egypt. (See: Joseph's importance)
  • The sojourn in Egypt was 1522-1312 BCE. The enslavement in Egypt began in 1428 BCE.

Moses and Joshua:
  • Moshe (Moses) was born in 1392 BCE. He played a key role in the Exodus, and brought down the Two Stone Tablets from God. (See: A biography of Moses and Joshua)
  • The forty years in the Wilderness were 1312-1272 BCE.
Era of Joshua:
  • The Israelites crossed the Jordan into Canaan, 1272 BCE. Yehoshua (Joshua, died 1244 BCE), leader after Moses, led the conquest of Canaan. His period of leadership was 1272-1244 BCE.


Era of the Judges: (See also: Who were the Judges?) The era of the Judges was 1244-879 BCE. Here are some of the prominent Judges:

  • Devorah became leader in 1107 BCE. She was a female Torah-sage and Judge who led a miraculous victory over a Canaanite king (Judges ch.4-5).
  • Gideon became Judge in 1067 BCE. He led a miraculous victory over the Midianites (Judges ch.6-8).
  • Yiphtach (Jephthah) became leader in 982 BCE. He led a miraculous victory over the Ammonites (Judges ch.11).
  • Shimshon (Samson) became leader in 951 BCE. This Judge had unequaled strength and subdued the Philistines for many years (Judges ch.13-15).
  • Shmuel (Samuel) became leader in 890 BCE. He marked the transition from Judges to Kings. (See: More about Samuel)


Era of the Kings: The era of the Kings lasted until the destruction of the First Temple in 422 BCE. (See also: Who were the Kings?) Here are some of the prominent kings, prophets and events:

  • Shaul (Saul), died 876 BCE, was first of the Kings. 1 Samuel ch.8-31.
  • King David reigned 40 years, from 876 BCE.
  • The building of the First Temple commenced in 832 BCE, by King Solomon, who reigned 40 years. See 1 Kings ch.6-8. The First Temple stood for 410 years.
  • Yerav'am ben Nevat (Jeroboam) took power in 796 BCE. He split the Ten Tribes (the Northern Kingdom of Israel) away from the southern Tribes (the Southern Kingdom) of Judah and Benjamin (1 Kings ch.12). (See: Why did the Ten Tribes break away from Judah?)
  • Eliyahu (Elijah), 8th century BCE, famous prophet. See 1 Kings ch.17 until 2 Kings ch.2.
  • Yeshayahu (Isaiah), best-known of the Prophets, began his prophecies in 619 BCE. (See: What was the role of the Prophets?)
  • Exile of the Ten Tribes by the Assyrians to points unknown, in 555 BCE. (See: Where are the Ten Tribes?)
  • Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) began his prophecies in 463 BCE. Warned about the impending Destruction.
  • Yechezkel (Ezekiel) prophesied, 429 BCE.
  • Destruction of the First Temple, in 422 BCE.


Era of the Babylonian Exile (422-352 BCE):

  • Daniel interpreted Nebuchadnezzar's dream in 421 BCE.
  • Zerubavel led the Jewish return to Israel (Judea) in 371 BCE, after King Cyrus of Persia permitted it. 18 years later, another wave of Jews returned with Ezra, while Nehemiah oversaw the rebuilding of the walls.
  • The events of Purim (Scroll of Esther) were in 355 BCE. (See: More about Esther)


Second Temple Era (352 BCE-68 CE):

  • Building of the Second Temple, 352 BCE. The Second Temple stood for 420 years. Soon after its construction, prophecy ceased.
  • Anshei Knesset HaGedolah - The Men of the Great Assembly. This Sanhedrin (high court of sages) sealed the canon of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible). (See: The history of the Hebrew Bible)
  • Alexander the Great, 313 BCE.
  • Shimon HaTzadik died in 273 BCE. One of the early sages.
  • Writing of the Septuagint, in 246 BCE.
  • The revolt of Mattityahu the Chashmona'i (Hasmonean), against the Syrian-Greeks, in 168 BCE.
  • The miracle of Hanukkah, 165 BCE. (See: more about Hanukkah)
  • Sh'lomit (Queen Salome) ruled 73-64 BCE. A brief period of peace in the turbulent Second Temple era.
  • The Romans gained control of Judea in 61 BCE.
  • Hillel, died 8 BCE. A beloved sage, famous for his humility.
  • Agrippa I (grandson of Herod) ruled, 21 CE (= "Common Era"). A rare instance of a benign Roman ruler. Not to be confused with the wicked Agrippa II, who began ruling 35 years later.
  • Christianity started spreading around this time, but not among the Jews. (See: Why the Jews didn't accept Jesus)
  • Destruction of the Second Temple, 68 CE. (See: Destruction and Diaspora)


Era of the Mishna and Talmud-sages:

  • Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai, died 74 CE, gained the favor of Vespasian and managed to rescue a number of leading Torah-sages and brought them to the yeshiva (Torah-academy) in Yavneh. (See: What Rabbi Yochanan ben Zakkai did for Judaism)
  • Betar fell, and Bar Kochba's revolt ended in tragedy, 133 CE.
  • Rabbi Akiva, died 134 CE, was a leading Torah-sage throughout the Roman upheavals.
  • Rabbi Judah Hanassi, died 188 CE, completed the redaction of the Mishna (Oral Law), based on ancient tradition.
  • Rav (Rabbi Abba Aricha) left Israel and settled in Babylonia, 219 CE. Founded the yeshiva (Torah academy) of Sura. Died 247 CE.
  • Rabbi Yochanan was the leading Talmudic authority, 254 CE. Redacted the Jerusalem Talmud.
  • Rabbi Yehudah was the leading Talmudic authority, 298 CE. Disciple of Rav.
  • Abayei and Rava were the leading Talmudic authorities, 325 CE. These two participated in the redaction of the Babylonian Talmud.
  • Rav (Rabbi) Ashi was the leading Talmudic authority, 392 CE.
  • Final redaction of the Talmud, 475 CE. It was put in writing 25 years later.


Era of the Geonim (Torah-leaders in Babylonia):

  • The yeshiva of Pumbeditha was reopened (after Persian persecutions), 589 CE. Era of the Geonim begins.
  • The yeshiva of Sura was reopened, 609 CE.
  • Rabbi Yitzchak was the last Gaon (sage) of Neharde'a (Firuz-Shabur). 636 CE.
  • Rabbi Achai Gaon left Bavel (Iraq) for Israel, 755 CE.
  • The Halakhot Gedolot, an early codex of halakha (Torah laws), was written at this time. 759 CE.
  • Rabbi Amram (who put the Siddur [prayerbook] in writing), became Gaon (Torah-leader) of Sura. 858 CE.
  • Rabbi Saadya (882-942) was appointed Gaon of Sura, 928 CE. He led opposition against the breakaway Karaites.
  • Four sages were taken hostage and ransomed at around this time, 955 CE. This event contributed to the spread of Torah-learning to lands other than Babylonia.
  • Rabbi Sherira (906-1006) became Gaon of Pumbedita, 968 CE.
  • Rabbi Hai Gaon (939-1038), last of the leading Babylonian Torah sages.


European Jewry:

  • Rabbi Gershom Me'or HaGolah (c.960-1040) was the sage who decreed against Jewish polygamy.
  • Rabbi Isaac Al-Fasi (1013-1103) was the author of a major compendium of Halakha.
  • Rashi (Rabbi Shelomo Yitzchaki, 1040-1105), author of the greatest of the Talmud commentaries.
  • First Crusade, 1096. First recorded blood libel, 1144.
  • Rabbenu Tam (Rabbi Yaakov Tam, 1100-1170), a leading Talmudist. He was a grandson of Rashi.
  • The Rambam (Maimonides), 1135-1204, author of several major works in halakha and Jewish thought.
  • A massive burning of the Talmud by anti-Semites took place in Paris, 1242.
  • The Inquisition began to use torture, 1252.
  • The Ramban (Nachmanides), 1194-1270, author of a leading commentary on the Torah.
  • All Jews were expelled from England, 1290.
  • The Maharam (Rabbi Meir) of Rothenburg (1215-1293), last of the Tosafists (early Talmud-commentators).
  • The Ralbag (Rabbi Levi ben Gershom), 1288-1344, author of a commentary on the Bible.
  • Rabbi Nissim (1320-1376), and other Torah-scholars in Spain, were imprisoned. 1367.
  • The expulsion of Jews from France, 1394.
  • Rabbi Yosef Albo (1380-1444) was in a forced debate with Christians, 1413.
  • The invention of printing, 1440s.
  • Rabbi Ovadya Bertinura (1445-1515), Rabbi in Yerushalayim (Jerusalem) from 1488, author of the leading commentary on the Mishna.
  • Jews expelled from Spain and Sicily, 1492.
  • Rabbi Yitzchak Abarbanel (1437-1508), Rabbi in Naples from 1493. Author of a book on Jewish thought.
  • All Jews were expelled from Portugal, 1496.
  • The Turks (Ottoman Empire) conquered the land of Israel, 1516.
  • Rabbi Joseph Caro (1488-1575) published the Shulchan Arukh, a leading text of Jewish law, in 1566.


Later Rabbis and events:

  • Rabbi Isaac Luria (1534-1572), was a leading kabbalist.
  • The Maharal (Rabbi Loewe), 1512-1609, Rabbi in Prague from 1573. Maker of the legendary Golem.
  • Rabbi Shmuel Eidels (1555-1631), Rabbi in Lublin from 1614, author of a leading Talmud commentary.
  • Rabbi Yoel Sirkes (1561-1640), author of a major commentary on the Shulchan Arukh.
  • Rabbi Shabsei Cohen (1621-1662) and Rabbi David Halevi (1586-1667) publish leading commentaries on the Shulchan Arukh in 1646.
  • Chmielnicki massacres, 1648-9.
  • Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzatto (1707-1746), author of a famous text on piety.
  • Rabbi Israel Ba'al Shem Tov (1700-1760), founder of modern Hassidism.
  • The Pale of Jewish Settlement was established in Russia, 1791.
  • The Vilna Gaon (Rabbi Eliyahu of Vilna, 1720-1797), famous Talmudist.
  • Rabbi Chaim Yosef David Azulai (1724-1806), sage and biliographer.
  • Rabbi Nachman of Breslov (1772-1810), charismatic pietist and Hassidic leader.
  • Rabbi Yisrael Salanter (1810-1883), founder of the modern Mussar movement.
  • Rabbi Meir Malbim (1809-1879), opponent of the secularists (Haskalah), authored a major commentary on the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible).
  • Rabbi Israel Meir Kohen (Chafetz Chaim), 1838-1933, beloved pietist and Talmudist.
  • Wave of Russian pogroms begins, 1881.
  • Rabbi Shlomo Ganzfried (1804-1886), author of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch.
  • Rabbi Abraham Karelitz (Chazon Ish), 1878-1953, leading Torah sage in Israel from 1933.
  • Germany started World War II, and mass killing of 6 million Jews, 1939.
878889
History of the United States
Historical Figures

What did Angelina Grimke and Catharine Beecher agree on?

They agreed that women should be a part of reform movements. (APEX)
818283
Historical Figures

Who were some famous historical figures in the state of Idaho?

Fumcuat loana- Poet

919293
Philosophy and Philosophers
Confucianism
Historical Figures

Who were some important figures in Confucianism and Daoism?

1. Confucius

2. Mencius

3. Xunzi

4. Zhuhangzi

5. Dong Zhoung

Theres alot more.

798081
William H. Taft
Historical Figures
American Old West

Who is William H. Bonney?

William H. Bonney was a robber and murderer of the American Wild West. He lived from 1859 to 1881. He was known as "Billy the Kid".

777879
Native American History
Mohandas Gandhi
Historical Figures

What did Indians call MK Gandhi?

The Indians Called Gandhi...Gandhi's real name was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi Indians call him Mahatma Gandhi and also call him Bapu(Father).
757677
Buddhism
Louisiana
Historical Figures

What are some important traditions of Buddhism?

Charity; giving alms.. Humility; accepting alms...

757677
Genealogy
Famous People
Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages
Historical Figures

What is Jimmy Hoffa's Nationality?

According to wikipedia Jimmy Hoffa was born in Brazil, Indiana.

626364
Buddhism
Hinduism
Historical Figures

Who are historical figures of Hinduism?

You said historical. Sanskrit grammarian Panini, the Vedic commentator Yaska, Emperor Chandragupta Vikramaditya of the Gupta dynasty; Southern Indian Emperors Raja Raja Chola and Rajendra Chola; Hinduism philosophers Adi (the first) Sankara, Madhva, Ramanuja, Nimbarka, Chaitanya; the great devotees Tulsi, Surdas, Meera, Tukaram, Jnaneshwar, Eknath, Azhwars, Nayanars, Gorakhnath, Kabeer, Buddha, Nanak, Mahavira; Emperor Krishna Devaraya of Vijayanagara. Among the recents, Ramakrishna, Vivekananda, Raman Maharshi, Chinmayananda, Shivananda; astronomers and mathematicians Aryabhatta, Brahmagupta, Varahamihira, Bhaskara, Madhava of Samgamgrama, etc.

TAKEN STRAIGHT FROM WIKIPEDIA! DON'T COPY WORD FOR WORD :]

The earliest evidence for prehistoric religion in India date back to the late Neolithic in the early Harappan period (5500-2600 BCE).[78][89] The beliefs and practices of the pre-classical era (1500-500 BCE) are called the "historical Vedic religion". Modern Hinduism grew out of the Vedas, the oldest of which is the Rigveda, dated to 1700-1100 BCE.[90] The Vedas center on worship of deities such as Indra, Varuna and Agni, and on the Soma ritual. They performed fire-sacrifices, called yajña, and chanted Vedic mantras but did not build temples or icons.[citation needed] The oldest Vedic traditions exhibit strong similarities to Zoroastrianism and other Indo-European religions.[91]

The major Sanskrit epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata, were compiled over a protracted period during the late centuries BCE and the early centuries CE. They contain mythological stories about the rulers and wars of ancient India, and are interspersed with religious and philosophical treatises. The later Puranas recount tales about devas and devis, their interactions with humans and their battles against demons.

Three major movements underpinned the naissance of a new epoch of Hindu thought: the advent and spread of Upanishadic, Jaina, and Buddhist philosophico-religious thought throughout the broader Indian landmass.[92] Mahavira (24th Tirthankar of Jains) and Buddha (founder of Buddhism) taught that to achieve moksha or nirvana, one did not have to accept the authority of the Vedas or the caste system. Buddha went a step further and claimed that the existence of a Self/soul or God was unnecessary.[93] Buddhism peaked during the reign of Asoka the Great of the Mauryan Empire, who unified the Indian subcontinent in the 3rd century BCE. After 200 CE several schools of thought were formally codified in Indian philosophy, including Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisheshika, Purva-Mimamsa and Vedanta.[94] Charvaka, the founder of an atheistic materialist school, came to the fore in North India in the sixth century BCE.[95] Between 400 BCE and 1000 CE Hinduism expanded at the expense of Buddhism.[96]

Sanskritic culture went into decline after the end of the Gupta period. The early medieval Puranas helped establish a religious mainstream among the pre-literate tribal societies undergoing acculturation. The tenets of Brahmanic Hinduism and of the Dharmashastras underwent a radical transformation at the hands of the Purana composers, resulting in the rise of a mainstream "Hinduism" that overshadowed all earlier traditions.[97]

Akshardham Temple in Delhi.

Though Islam came to India in the early 7th century with the advent of Arab traders and the conquest of Sindh, it started to become a major religion during the later Muslim conquest in the Indian subcontinent.[95] During this period Buddhism declined rapidly and many Hindus converted to Islam. Numerous Muslim rulers such as Aurangzeb destroyed Hindu temples and persecuted non-Muslims; however some, such as Akbar, were more tolerant. Hinduism underwent profound changes, in large part due to the influence of the prominent teachers Ramanuja, Madhva, and Chaitanya.[95] Followers of the Bhakti movement moved away from the abstract concept of Brahman, which the philosopher Adi Shankara consolidated a few centuries before, with emotional, passionate devotion towards the more accessible avatars, especially Krishna and Rama.[98]

Indology as an academic discipline of studying Indian culture from a European perspective was established in the 19th century, led by scholars such as Max Müller and John Woodroffe. They brought Vedic, Puranic and Tantric literature and philosophy to Europe and the United States. At the same time, societies such as the Brahmo Samaj and the Theosophical Society attempted to reconcile and fuse Abrahamic and Dharmic philosophies, endeavouring to institute societal reform. This period saw the emergence of movements which, while highly innovative, were rooted in indigenous tradition. They were based on the personalities and teachings of individuals, as with Shri Ramakrishna and Ramana Maharshi. Prominent Hindu philosophers, including Sri Aurobindo and Swami Prabhupada (founder of ISKCON), translated, reformulated and presented Hinduism's foundational texts for contemporary audiences in new iterations, attracting followers and attention in India and abroad. Others such as Swami Vivekananda, Paramahansa Yogananda, B.K.S. Iyengar and Swami Rama have also been instrumental in raising the profiles of Yoga and Vedanta in the West. Today modern movements, such as ISKCON and the Swaminarayan Faith, attract a large amount of followers across the world.[99]

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Science
History of the United States
Brain
Historical Figures

What happened to John Dillinger's brain?

from the research I have done, it was buried with him at Crown_Hill_Cemetery(Section: 44 Lot: 94) in Indianapolis, Indiana. (see wikipedia.org - search for "John Dillinger"

616263
Judaism
Historical Figures

Who is Judaism's founding figure?

Judaism has three patriarchs: Abraham, Yitzchak, and Yaacov. However, Judaism does not have a single founder.

  • Jewish answer:
Tradition states that Abraham (18th century BCE) founded Judaism.
The Kuzari (Rabbi Judah HaLevi, 1075-1141) states that Abraham was gifted with high intelligence; and, as Maimonides (1135-1204) describes, Abraham didn't blindly accept the ubiquitous idolatry. The whole populace had been duped, but the young Abraham contemplated the matter relentlessly, finally arriving at the conclusion that there is One God and that this should be taught to others as well. This is what is meant by his "calling out in the name of the Lord" (Genesis ch.12). As a young man, he remonstrated with passersby in public, demonstrating to them the falsehood of their idols; and our tradition tells how he was threatened and endangered by Nimrod.
Subsequently, Terah relocated to Harran; and it is here that Abraham began to develop a circle of disciples (Rashi commentary, on Genesis 12:5). Later, God told Abraham in prophecy to move to the Holy Land, which is where he raised his family. He continued his contemplations, eventually arriving at the attitudes and forms of behavior which God later incorporated into the Torah given to Moses.
Abraham became the greatest thinker of all time. His originality, perseverance, strength of conviction, and influence, cannot be overestimated.
He founded the Jewish people and lived to see his work live on in the persons of Isaac and Jacob; and he taught many other disciples as well (Talmud, Yoma 28b).
Abraham entered into a covenant with God (Genesis ch.15 and 17), welcomed guests into his home (Genesis ch.18) unlike the inhospitable Sodomites (Genesis ch.19), prayed for people (Genesis ch.18), eulogized and buried the deceased (Genesis ch.23), and fulfilled God's will unquestioningly (Genesis ch.22). He became renowned as a prince of God (Genesis 23:6).
All of the above practices of Abraham were based upon the ways of God. These, and similar traits, were the teachings of Abraham and his descendants (unlike idolatry, which had no moral character; with worship of the gods accompanied by things such as human sacrifice, "sacred" prostitution, and animal worship). It is therefore clear why God expresses His love for Abraham (Isaiah 41:8) and calls Himself the God of Abraham (Genesis 26:24), and says that Abraham obeyed Him fully (Genesis 26:5).
The gravesite of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and their wives (Genesis 49:29-32) is located in Hebron and has been known and attested to for many centuries.
333435
Historical Figures

Did Robert Boyle have any kids or a wife?

maby he did maybe he didnt

474849
Christianity
Historical Figures

Who are historical figures of Christianity?

Israel crossing the red sea

key figures: The Trinity, Father(God) Holy Spirit, and the Son (Jesus)

Abraham- father of Issac who's desendents where Jewish and them later changed into Christianity

historical events: The Flee from Egypt and captivity the search for the promise land the walls of Jericho that fell Jesus' birth "parents" Mary/Joseph (who were not married and were teenagers) Jesus walking on water Jesus feeding the 500 men + women and children who were not counted as "a person" at the time Jesus' death on the cross and resurrection

Jesus Christ is the historical figure of Christianity.

the figures of Christianity is god and Jesus who is the son of god.

Jesus Christ

454647
Ancient History
Historical Figures

Why is Herodotus considered the father of history?

Herodotus is considered the father of history because his history of the Persian War was the first narrative in the form that later came out be considered written history.

More importantly, Herodutus was one of the first to disregard the supernatural in his writings. You get this more when you get to Thucydides, but Herodutus, in general, tends to leave out things that are credited to the gods. Or he tries to find a logical explanation for them.

Although Herodotus may not have been the first to record history, his accomplishment was very admired by Greek authorities in Athens where he was provided temporary residence. The Athenians called him the "Father of History." The word for history at the time, was "inquiries." The book he wrote is called "The Researches or The Inquiries." Herodotus appears to have drawn on an Ionian tradition of storytelling, collecting and interpreting the oral histories he chanced upon in his travels. These oral histories often contained folktale motifs and demonstrated a moral, yet they also contained substantial facts relating to geography, anthropology and history, all compiled by Herodotus in an entertaining style and format. Sometime after his death, the Alexandrians properly formatted the book into 9 books and called it the "9 Muses."

He was the first person to collect 'historical' material and test the accuracy of the material. As a result of his inquiries a new word passed into Latin (historia) and this became 'History' in the English language

454647
John Adams
Authors, Poets, and Playwrights
Historical Figures
Canadian Military

When was John Buchan born?

John Buchan was born on August 26, 1875.

434445
Historical Figures

Who are historical figures of confucianism?

Confucianism is a doctrine of philosophical and ethical teachings founded by Confucius. Other notable figures of Confucianism are Menciu, Zengzi, Xun Xi and Zhu Xi.

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