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History of England

The history of England can be traced back 230,000 years when the Neanderthals inhabited the island. Numerous wars, uprisings, developments, and changes have happened to England that influenced what it is today.

500 Questions

Who was the king of England in 1781?

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King George (III).

He reignedfrom 1760 - 1820 (60 years) He was one of the longer reigning monarchs. In the last ten years of his reign he went mad ; thought to be porphyria' ; his eldest son Prince George became Prince Regent.

Prince George, the Prince Regent, became King George (IV) in 1820 .

King Georgew(III) immediate predecessoir was King George(II).

How can you steal from rich people?

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You don't !!!!

Stealing is a 'sin' Remember the 10 Commandments from God in the Bible.

Importance of loyalty in elizabethan times?

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family loyalty in the elizabethan era was considered more important than anything else, if you were upper class, you were expected to be in an aranged marriage aroung the time of 13, to 15. it was considered unpure, to not be married with children by 15 years old. marriage wasnt a contract of love either. it was all about power and money. marrying for love, (unless your father is lord capulet) was looked down on, and seen as not being loyal to your family

What is the United Kingdom verses Great Britain?

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The United Kingdom is a shortened name for 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland'. It contains the nations, England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The Isle of Man is legally a separate nation, and not part of the UK.

Also the Republic of Ireland, is a legally separate nation in the British Isles. It is NOT part of the UK, nor the British Commonwealth.

The 'The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland'. It contains the nations, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

goes by various shortened names, UK, United Kingdom , GB, Great Britain, Britain, and erroneously England.

'Great Britain' is the main/largest island of the British Isles.

Who is sovereign today in Great Britain?

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King Charles(III) is sovereign of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

He has been sovereign since September 2022 , on the death of his mother , Queen Elizabeth (II).

Which political institution shares a building with Big Ben?

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The political institution is 'The Houses of Parliament'.

'Big Ben' is the main bell in the Elizabeth Clock Tower of the Palace of Westmoinster (The building). The Palce of Westminster contains the two houses of parliament, viz. The House of Lords, and the House of Commons.

At the other end of the Palace of Westminster is the Victoria Tower, from which the flag flies.

Parliament is the legislature of the United Kingdom . This legislature is so arranged that it allows political parties to send memebers by election to the House of Commons. The House of Lords is were the lords of the land are allowed to sit and vote , and amend ,on bills before they become Acts of Parliament. Their lordships can be of any political party, or of no political party (cross benchers).

The word 'Parliament' comes from the French Medieaval word ' To Parler' , that is 'to speak'.

NB Another great bell in London is 'Great Tom' . It is in one of the clocktowers of St., Paul's Cathedral in London.

What towns in England end in chester or caster?

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Manchester, Colchester, Dorchester, Chichester, Winchester, Portchester, Rochester, Worchester

There is also the City of Chester in the north west of England, Ilchester in Somerset and Silchester in Hampshire. The "chester" suffix derives from the Latin word castra, meaning a camp or settlement, so these towns had been settled by the Romans during the Roman occupation of Britain which lasted from about the year 40 AD until about 450 - 500 AD. "Worchester" does not exist but the town of Worcester has a similar derivation - the "-cester" part also comes from the Latin word castra. Others with slightly different forms of castra include Alcester, Lancaster, Cirencester, Gloucester (pronounced Gloster), Leicester (pronounced Lester) Tadcaster, Wroxeter and Towcester, (pronounced Toaster.)

What tools did colonial seamstress use?

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A colonial seamstress sews clothing back together and they also make dresses.

How many ROOMS did Tudor houses have?

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A Nobles Family home would have 50+ rooms. To be exact, 52.

The amount of rooms depended on how big it was. A huge house would have 50 - 60 rooms.

The 'homes' weren't even homes!! They were really mansions!!

What do you do when your poor?

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You struggle to make ends meet

Who was king Henry and what did he do?

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he was a mean person who lived with mean people in a mean castle on a mean hill in a mean country in a mean continent in a mean world in a mean solar system in a mean galaxy in a mean universe in a mean dimension

Where did the Anglo-Saxon get their food from?

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The Anglo-Saxons primarily got their food from farming and animal husbandry. They cultivated crops such as wheat, barley, and rye, and raised livestock such as sheep, cattle, and pigs. They also gathered wild foods, such as berries, nuts, and game, from the forests and countryside.

Were people sad when Thomas Becket died?

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Yes, many people were indeed sad when Thomas Becket died. As the Archbishop of Canterbury, Becket was highly regarded as a religious figure and a champion of church rights. His murder in 1170 shocked and outraged many, leading to a popular cult of martyrdom and widespread mourning.

How did the ragged school help the homeless Victorian children?

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Ragged schools in Victorian times were non-profit institutions that provided free education, food, clothing, and shelter to homeless and impoverished children. They aimed to improve the lives of these children by offering them a safe and nurturing environment, teaching them basic literacy and numeracy skills, and providing them with the opportunity for a better future. Ragged schools played a crucial role in addressing the needs of homeless children and giving them a chance to escape the cycle of poverty.

How did they treat deafness in Tudor times?

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In Tudor times, there was limited understanding of deafness and its treatment. Deaf individuals were often marginalized and treated as outcasts. Some attempts were made to communicate with them using manual gestures or rudimentary forms of sign language, but these were not widely recognized or understood. Overall, there was little to no formal education or support for deaf individuals during this time period.

What did Victorian children do in PE?

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In Victorian times, physical education for children focused more on discipline and military training rather than recreational activities. Boys participated in organized sports like football, cricket, and rowing to develop physical strength and camaraderie. Girls, on the other hand, were taught calisthenics, dance, and exercises aimed at improving posture and gracefulness.

Was there garlic in Tudor times?

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Yes, garlic was used in Tudor times as a popular seasoning and ingredient in various dishes. It was believed to have medicinal properties and was also used to ward off evil spirits or to prevent illness. Garlic was commonly used in both savory and sweet recipes.

Who was the invading England in 1805?

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In 1805, England was not being invaded. Instead, England was part of the Grand Alliance that was fighting against France under Napoleon Bonaparte, who was trying to expand his empire throughout Europe. The Battle of Trafalgar, a major naval battle in October 1805, was a significant event in this conflict.

What are three other important writers or artists of the Elizabethan age?

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Three other important writers or artists of the Elizabethan Age are Christopher Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, and Thomas Campion. Marlowe was a renowned playwright and poet known for works like "Doctor Faustus." Spenser was a poet who wrote the epic poem "The Faerie Queene." Campion was a poet, musician, and composer known for his songs and masques.

Did people in England's royalty marry their relatives?

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Yes, historically, people in England's royalty often married their relatives. This was done to maintain bloodlines, consolidate power, and form political alliances. However, in recent centuries, the practice of marrying close relatives has become less common due to changing societal norms and concerns about genetic health.

What English city was one of the first industrial cities in Great Britain?

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Manchester is widely regarded as one of the first industrial cities in Great Britain. It experienced rapid industrialization in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, particularly in the textile industry. The construction of canals, railways, and factories contributed to Manchester's transformation into a hub of manufacturing and trade.

Why did parliament become stronger after Charles first was executed?

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Parliament became stronger after the execution of Charles I because it established the principle that the monarch was not above the law and could be held accountable by the people. This led to the abolition of the monarchy and the establishment of the Commonwealth and later the Protectorate under Oliver Cromwell. The power shifted from the monarchy to the parliamentary system, giving parliament more authority and control over the government.

How many flags are there representing great Britain?

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There are three flags representing Great Britain - the Union Jack, the flag of England, and the flag of Scotland.

Education of all handicapped children act of 1975?

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The Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), is a federal law that ensures children with disabilities have access to a free and appropriate public education. It requires schools to provide special education and related services to eligible students, based on their individual needs. IDEA also sets forth procedural safeguards to protect the rights of children with disabilities and their parents.