Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

Includes questions related to distinct vocabularies used by a group of people such as physicians use medical terminology; also includes words, terms and phrases that are deemed inappropriate for a formal setting.

Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Urban Slang

What are some slang words for money?

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Slang for money American slang, bill-specific C-note, Benjamin ($100), Jackson, twankie, double sawbuck ($20), sawbuck ($10), fin ($5), buck ($1) American - General Bucks, bills, dollas, cash, paper, greenbacks, moolah, scratch, scrip (usually not legal tender), green, long green, cabbage, kale, lettuce, loot, dough, potatoes (usually pronounced puhtaytuhs), bread, bacon, clams, one large ($100), Fin (Five) Cheese, Cheddar. dead presidents British Dosh (cash/money), wonger (money, chiefly heard in London) Australian Coin, Shrapnel, Chinese dayang, chaopiao, rmb, piaozi Spanish billuya, plata, billete, palos, lana, billegas. . .
Asked in Literature and Language, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

What does You'll end up in smoke mean?

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Your plans will fall through or things won't go well.
Asked in Math and Arithmetic, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Definitions

What does it mean to '86' someone?

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To remove, end usage, or take something out or away. Despite ALL other posts suggesting the origin of this phrase there is only one true answer: Chumley's, a famous and OLD New York speakeasy, is located at 86 Bedford Stuy During Prohibition, an entrance through an interior adjoined courtyard was used, as it provided privacy and discretion for customers. As was (and is) a New York tradition, the cops were on the payroll of the bar and would give a ring to the bar that they were coming for a raid. The bartender would then give the command "86 everybody!", which meant that everyone should hightail it out the 86 Bedford entrance because the cops were coming in through the courtyard door."86 that light" "Everyone in Sales got 86'd." New entry: in CSL (Cockney Slang Rhyme), 86 = nix = nothing, so it could be that all of the other variations have evolved from this.
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

What does the slang term Bo mean?

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Bo comes from the French Beau=- handsome or attractive and similar in meaning to Fashion Plate or playboy type- who likes loud sartorial styles. Jazz-Bo also applies a sort of gadabout attitude coupled with musical taste.
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Definitions

What does 'beat his chest' means?

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Male gorillas beat their chests as a show of strength and dominance, in an attempt to challenge or intimidate other males. We've adopted the expression to refer to someone who does something (scream at a subordinate, for example) for no other reason than to remind everyone who's in charge, especially the kind of person who makes a habit of doing so.
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Buffalo and Bison

What is the correct expression for busy as a buffalo?

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The preferred expression is "BUSTLIN' like a Bison" for the only time you ever see a buffalo get active about anything is during the rut, or Rutting Season. Otherwise they are oblivious to anything and everything around them, (as long as you are not down wind of them) because of their typically poor eyesight and heavy weight. This is more or less one of archaic colloquialisms of the time that has lost its priority in our society today and was a more genteel plainsman's way of saying you were "slow" or rather clueless to your own immediate surroundings.
Asked in Relationships, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

What is the girl version of a lad?

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A lass or lassy. Lass means friend in slang. (used for girls)
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Internet Slang, Urban Slang

Why do people use slang?

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It is easy, and plus some people want to use slang so that their parents or anyone else doesn't know what they are talking about. It is the same with txt mssgng (text messaging) as people are so lazy that they cn't even use vwls anymore! It is also indicative of a poor vocabulary and difficulty of sef-expresion. Slang has a place in social situations , but if you want a good job, learn and use proper English in the workplace. I'm from Scotland. Slang is a part of our culture. Well..to most people who live in other countries we speak slang..we're really just speaking Scottish dialect to some extent, the majority of it is slang though. >i agree i use slang alot and cuz off that its effctin my English im usin it now cuz im used to it but its come into everyday ppls lives and yes i will carry on usin it as a matter of habit tho i shudnt !!!!! Also it is used by teenagers to act like they are cool! It draws attention to people and it is like another language which adults can't read or understand! Bc they don't know how to say the right words!
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Word and Phrase Origins

What does ride like the wind mean?

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Ride really fast so wind will blow in your face. Don't know the orgin, but it infers riding a horse, bicycle or motorcycle. In another interpretation it means, ride really fast, make haste, ride quickly. In other words travel quickly to your destination.
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Definitions, Simon Cowell

What does What is up with you really mean?

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It can be a freindly greeting or a question asking why your feeling diffrent from usuall. stand up
Asked in Literature and Language, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

What does cold as a wedge mean?

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It is an expression or a phrase used to describe unconsciousness, dead or unfeeling, basically anything that is "cold"
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Definitions

What does not at all mean?

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Haha, um you can use it in a number of ways to describe either a certain situtation or characteristic. It means... was not, is not. It is usually used when someone asks you a yes no question, and you want to emphasize that it, isn't or wasn't.
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Internet Slang, Urban Slang

What are some fun slang words for children?

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rugrats, ankle-biters, cubbies, rascals, Munchkins, nose-miners, whipper snappers, tykes, spawn, larvae......
Asked in History, Politics & Society, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Names and Name Meanings

What does 'Rogues in Robes' mean?

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today's best example of rogues in robes is The Robert's Activist Supreme Court. The sacrifice of Constitutional "One Man/One Vote" Tenet for the sake of Political Party Gains is, by definition, a rogue-court's ruling to allow Corporations to be treated as if they were people or voters with regard to financial "Rights of Free Speech" and allows the entry of rogue players in the US Electoral Process.
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Example Sentences

How do you use peeved in a sentence?

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To be peeved- its a verb Examples: I am really peeved at you (I am really angry/annoyed at you) She is really peeved at him because he stole her car space.
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Definitions

What is dying sunlight means?

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"Dying sunlight" or "dying light" means that the light is fading to darkness, usually at sunset.
Asked in Fish, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

What is trouser snout?

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Trouser snout is the feminine of "trouser snake" (aka camel toe)
Asked in Entertainment & Arts, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

What do you mean by worth a darn?

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If a stocking was worth anything, it was worth mending -- which is called darning! So if you're not worth anything, you're not worth a darn.
Asked in Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Urban Slang

What does raked mean in teen slang?

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To get stoned/drunk/wiped out from partying or something like that.
Asked in Science, Basketball, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Journalism

What is the sports lingo in basketball?

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This is a fascinating question, because slang is always changing, and the "lingo" of any sport will also adapt, as rules change and playing styles change. Today, one of the most common expressions is "slam dunk"-- where the player jumps high and slams the ball into the basket. Fifty years ago, this play was not seen, so there was no expression for it. Basketball announcers use various slang expressions, and here are a few of them. To "drain a three" is to successful shoot a basket from a long distance, which means you get three points rather than the two points you get for making a shorter shot. You may hear "player X took player Y to school" or "player X really schooled player Y"-- this means that one player showed himself to be superior on a particular play and made the other player look inept or foolish. "All net!" or "Swish!" means the player made a shot that went right through the net, not touching the rim or bouncing off the backboard. You may find it helpful to watch a game on TV but turn down the sound and listen to the play-by-play on the radio (the radio announcers will do more describing). That way, you can learn what the slang expressions mean and see how they apply to what the players just did.