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Iditarod

The Iditarod is an annual sled dog team race across Alaska. It is the most famous of all sled dog races.

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How did the Iditarod trail get its name?

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The Iditarod trail got its name from the town of Iditarod, which was a mining settlement along the trail. The trail itself was used as a mail route and supply line during the Alaskan gold rush in the early 1900s.

Do races of people have many homozygous genes?

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Individuals from the same race may have many homozygous genes due to shared ancestry and genetic relatedness within the population. However, variability in genetic diversity exists within and among different racial groups due to factors such as migration, admixture, and genetic drift.

What does rod mean in Iditarod?

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"Rod" in Iditarod refers to the Iditarod Trail in Alaska, which was historically used as a route for delivering mail and supplies during the gold rush. The Iditarod Trail later became famous for the sled dog race that follows the same route, known as the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.

What does the word frontier mean?

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A frontier refers to a border or boundary between two regions, often indicating the outer limits of civilization or known territory. It can also signify a new area of exploration or development, presenting opportunities for discovery and growth.

Why does the moon change location in the sky from one year to the next?

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Because it orbits the earth. When the moon is between the earth and sun, it is back lit and appears new. Two weeks later, when the moon is on the other side of the earth and as far from the sun as it can be, it appears full from earth. As it transitions from one of these to the other and then back again, the new moon waxes to fullness then wanes to newness again.

What is the average temperature for the Iditarod?

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The average temperature for the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Alaska can vary widely, but typically ranges from around -20°F to 20°F (-29°C to -6°C) during the race in March. Temperatures can drop significantly lower at night or in more remote areas of the trail.

How many people are in the Iditarod?

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The number of participants in the Iditarod sled dog race varies each year, but typically there are around 50-60 mushers who compete in the race, along with hundreds of sled dogs.

What does the phrase 'fata compli' mean and what language does it come from?

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I think you mean "fete accompli" and if so, it is from french, and it basically means "festival/celebration/event accomplished" Correct phrase is 'fait accompli' and translates, more or less, accomplished fact. Usage: By running away to be married, the two young people presented their parents with a 'fait accompli.' This is understood to mean 'NYAH nyah, can't touch this!

What was Gary paulsen's finishing place in iditarod?

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Gary Paulsen finished in 41st place in the 1983 Iditarod dog sled race.

Gary Paulsen's first race what place did he get?

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Gary Paulsen finished in a three-way tie for last place in his first sled dog race.

What is the Golden Harness award in the Iditarod?

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The Golden Harness award is given to the lead dog of the winning team in the Iditarod sled dog race. It is considered a prestigious honor in recognition of the hard work, skill, and endurance displayed by the lead dog throughout the race.

How many checkpoints in the Iditarod?

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There are 26 checkpoints on each route in the Iditarod. The southern route is taken on odd numbered years(such as this year,2013) and the northern route is taken on even numbered years. I'm not able to give the exact information of where each checkpoint is on both northern and southern routes, but somewhere else on wikianswers(this website).

How much does it cost to participate in the Iditarod race?

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In 2011 they receive a "purse" which is their prize money, with $528,000. They will also receive a red truck:D

Why was the Iditarod created?

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No one can MAKE a sled dog run and pull a sled. Mushers must build relationships with the dogs. Dogs are born, breed, and trained to run. These dogs have it in their blood line to love to run and pull. The dogs also have a natural 2 layer coat to protect them from the elements. The dogs get the best veterinarian care possible. But no one can MAKE a sled dog pull a sled and race. The dog has to want to do it. (It's like you can't push a string...)

What is the musher required to do in the event that an edible big game animal?

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Gut the animal and then report it to a race official at the next checkpoint.

What is in a iditarod?

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An iditarod is a dogsled race that takes place in Alaska. It is longest dogsled race (over 1100 miles).

What are the answers for the comprehension for the Iditarod dream?

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How many dog terms are entered in the jr. idiarod race

What kind of race is the Iditarod race?

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The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, usually just called the Iditarod, is an annual sled dog race in Alaska, where mushers and teams of typically 16 dogs cover 1,161 miles (1,868 km) in eight to fifteen days from Willow (near Anchorage) to Nome. The race begins on the first Saturday in March -- the 2010 race will begin on March 6th. The Iditarod began in 1973 as an event to test the best sled dog mushers and teams, evolving into the highly competitive race it is today. The current fastest winning time record was set in 2002 by Martin Buser with a time of 8 days, 22 hours, 46 minutes, and 2 seconds.[1]

Teams frequently race through blizzards causing whiteout conditions, sub-zero temperatures and gale-force winds which can cause the wind chill to reach −100 °F (−73.3 °C). The trail runs through the U.S. state of Alaska. A ceremonial start occurs in the city of Anchorage and is followed by the official restart in Willow, a city in the south central region of the state. The restart was originally in Wasilla, but due to too little snow, the restart was permanently moved to Willow in 2008.[2] The trail proceeds from Willow up the Rainy Pass of the Alaska Range into the sparsely populated interior, and then along the shore of the Bering Sea, finally reaching Nome in western Alaska. The teams cross a harsh landscape under the canopy of the Northern Lights, through tundra and spruce forests, over hills and mountain passes, and across rivers. While the start in Anchorage is in the middle of a large urban center, most of the route passes through widely separated towns and villages, and small Athabaskan and Inupiat settlements. The Iditarod is regarded as a symbolic link to the early history of the state, and is connected to many traditions commemorating the legacy of dog mushing. The trails alternate each year -- every even year they take the north trail and odd years they take the south trail.

The race is the most popular sporting event in Alaska, and the top mushers and their teams of dogs are local celebrities; this popularity is credited with the resurgence of recreational mushing in the state since the 1970s. While the yearly field of more than fifty mushers and about a thousand dogs is still largely Alaskan, competitors from fourteen countries have completed the event including the Swiss Martin Buser, who became the first international winner in 1992.

The Iditarod received more attention outside of the state after the 1985 victory of Libby Riddles, a long shot who became the first woman to win the race. Susan Butcher became the second woman to win the race, and went on to dominate for half a decade. Print and television journalists and crowds of spectators attend the ceremonial start at the intersection of Fourth Avenue and D Streets in Anchorage, and in smaller numbers at the checkpoints along the trail.

How has the Iditarod race changed over the years?

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it cam t be when two people wanted to race dogs and there be a prize for the winner they decided there would be two rounts the northern and the southern the northern is sorter while the southern is longer each year the flip flop back and forth

How many races of people are there?

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there are not that many, there are Caucasian, Asian and African, these 3 races spread into different directions across the world, hence we have so many people of different "colour" eg; the people in the Mediterranean are almost like an olive shade, Asian are more light beige Caucasian can go from pasty white to brownish, African can go from deepest ebony to light brown, then when people have children they can go either "colour" we all have the same "colour" blood bright red!! that is what makes us all human and brothers and sisters under the skin.

Restart of the 2010 Iditarod is what checkpoint?

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The Iditarod race begins in Anchorage, Alaska. The race ends in Nome, Alaska. The race takes place in the beginning of March.

What is the iditarod known as?

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The official nickname of the Iditarod's race is called The Last Great Race on Earth. The Iditarod is a sled dog race held in Nome, Alaska. ha-ha-ha. turn around. you are about to be hit. The official nickname of the Iditarod's race is called The Last Great Race on Earth. The Iditarod is a sled dog race held in Nome, Alaska. ha-ha-ha. turn around. you are about to be hit.