Ottoman Empire

Lasting nearly 650 years, the Ottoman Empire (modern day Turkey) was one of the most powerful empires the world has ever seen. Istanbul, its capital for the last 470 years, was one of the most culturally diverse cities on the planet at the time.

Asked in Ottoman Empire, Great Seljuq Empire

How did the Seljuk Turks defeat Constantinople?

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The Seljuk Turks didn't defeat Constantinople it was the Ottoman Turks the Seljuk's couldn't even defeat the Byzantine Empire it was all the Ottoman's
Asked in World War 1, History of Europe, Ottoman Empire

What happened to the ottoman empire after WWI?

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They eventually had to split the empire into countries that aren't the right Split Because Europe didn't know that they already had 3 major religions ;D
Asked in Ottoman Empire

Why is the story of Ayuba Suleiman Diallo unusual?

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few slaves could write down their experiences
Asked in History of Asia, Medieval Warfare, Ottoman Empire

What is significant about Sultan Mehmed II and Suleiman the Magnificent?

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Sultan Mehmed II of the Ottoman Empire was famous for mainly conqoring the one of the Holy Christian city of Constantinople and reforming its power and people to Islam beleifs. After conqoring the city, he moved the Ottoman Empire capital from Adrianople to Constantinople. To control his people from Christian uprisings, he gave them a choic; switch to Islamic or die. The Christian men who feared death chose to change religions, as though who were true to God and his son, chose death. The migration of people to Constantinople increased ideas, for individuals from all over where sharing ideas. Besides conqoring the city of Constantinople, Sultan Mehmed is also given credit for Eastern European urbanization.
Asked in Taj Mahal, Ottoman Empire

Is the taj mahal part of the ottoman empire?

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No.Taj Mahal is a part of Mughal Empire.
Asked in World War 1, History of Europe, Roman Empire, Ottoman Empire

Was the roman empire bigger than the ottoman empire?

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The Roman Empire was larger and surrounded the Ottoman empire at one time, however this inspired one of the Ottoman's Sultans (His name is evading me right now) to conquer a great deal of the Eastern Roman Empire's land. At that time the Ottoman Empire was larger. Currently though, both have fallen, so they're about even.
Asked in Istanbul and Constantinople, Ottoman Empire

When did Istanbul become the capital of the Ottoman Empire?

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Istanbul became the capital of the Ottoman Empire in 1453.
Asked in Iran, Ottoman Empire, Shiite Islam

Why did the Safavids come into conflict with the Ottomans?

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The two powers came into conflict for several reasons: Original Difference Between Sunnis and Shiites: The Muslim community was united while Muhammad was the leader of this community. Most Muslims hold, however, that he never specifically chose a successor to his leadership, called a CALIPH. There was a minority in the community that supported the candidacy of 'Ali, the Prophet's son-in-law, this political faction became known as the "Supporters of 'Ali" which in Arabic is Shiat 'Ali (where the modern term "Shiite" comes from). They derived their support from specific hadiths and events that they claimed showed that God had revealed to Muhammad that 'Ali would succeed him. The majority of Muslims held that these hadiths and events showed nothing more than that 'Ali was very pious, something they did not deny. Therefore they gave power to the man who was Muhammad's second-in-command and father-in-law Abu Bakr. This majority were called the People of the Customs [of the Prophet] which in Arabic is Ahl Sunna (from where the modern term "Sunni" comes from.) As the Ottomans were the standard bearers for Sunni Islam and the Safavids were the standard bearers for Shiite Islam, this religious difference brought about antagonism between the parties. Additionally, the Caliph of the Ottoman Empire was seen as the official successor of Muhammad throughout the Islamic World except for among Shiite Muslims, making the Safavid rejection of the religious authority of the Ottomans even more biting. Repression of In-Country Religious Minority: The Ottoman Empire discriminated against its Shiite minority population and the Safavid Empire discriminated against its Sunni minority population. As a result, the opposite country was enraged that its dominant group was being treated badly. Some particular incidents that drew particular ire from the other side are the following The Ottoman Empire saw the Shiites under its purview incorrectly as a fifth column for its rival in Persia, the Safavid Empire, which was a Shiite Islamic State. To prevent Shiite Muslims from becoming a critical mass in the country, the Ottomans massacred large numbers of Shiites, especially the Turkish Alevis, the Syrian Alawites, and many Lebanese Shiite Muslims (mostly Twelvers). The Persian Safavids fought several wars against neighboring Sunnis in Samarqand to the North and the Ottomans to the West. Ismail I (the first Safavid) adopted Twelver Shiite Islam and began to persecute the Sunnis in Iran. This reduced their community to a small minority in the Persian heartland. He destroyed numerous Sunni mosques and grave sites as well as mandating curses against the first three Rightly-Guided Caliphs. He also imprisoned and killed large populations of Sunnis for their beliefs and compelled conversion to Shiite Islam through violence. The Safavids also spread this form of Sunni oppression through conquest Azerbaijan and of southern Iraq and imposing conversion to Shiite Islam there as well. Territorial Expansion: The Ottoman Empire and the Safavid Empire were fighting over the control or vassalage of the same territories, primarily in Mesopotamia, Eastern Anatolia, and the Caucasus. As a result of having conflicting territorial ambitions, the two empires went to war several times. Trade Routes: Both the Ottoman Empire and the Safavid Empire sat along the Europe-to-China trade routes (also called the Silk Road) and each wanted to control the passage from West to East. However, the other empire was in the way of projecting power over the entire passage. (The Ottomans controlled the leg from the Iranian border to the Mediterranean and the Safavids controlled the access from the Middle East to Central Asia.) Of course, with European and Chinese advances in navigation, the Silk Road was eventually abandoned in large part for trade by oceanic shipping.
Asked in Ottoman Empire

Why did the Ottoman Empire attempt to reform itself?

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When the Ottoman Empire was at its territorial height in the 16th Century, it was the most technologically advanced nation in the world, and was greatly feared by the Christian nations of Europe. However, from then on the empire began to decline relative to the western nations, which advanced significantly in technological and political terms, and succeeded in acquiring large empire in the Americas and Far East. Following the Napoleonic Wars and the rise of nationalism, Greek nationalists started to agitate for independence, which they succeeded in doing with British, French and Russian assistance, while an Albanian general, Mohammed Ali, took control of Egypt, declared independence and conquered much of the Ottoman Empire's Arabian territory, and came close to taking Constantinople. It was only the western powers intervention from preventing the Ottomans being overthrown completely. After these events, the Ottomans realised they had to reform to catch up to the western world as a major power, and also to guarantee their own empire's independence. In 1828, Murad III, Sultan committed to reform, as a first step violently purged the Janissaries, the Sultans traditional bodyguard who over the centuries had become unreliable and were against reform and modernisation. He replaced them with a modern professional army based on western models with modern uniforms and equipment, and adopted modern tactics. It was also under his reign that the Tanzimat was enacted, which started in 1839 and was continued by his successor, Abdulmecid. Over the decades, the Ottomans made a very good job of reforming and modernising. The empire that was nearly destroyed in the 1820s had become a modern nation state, which in 1876 opened its first parliament, albeit with limited powers. Also in this period, they decisively defeated Serbia and Montenegro, crushed the Bulgarian rebels and very nearly defeated Russia one-on-one in the war that followed. However, the aftermath of the war was disastrous for the Ottomans. They only lost due to a lack of unified leadership, also being vastly superior in weaponry and, initially, in numbers. The Ottomans lost Bulgaria and Bosnia, which provided a third of the Empire's revenues, and Sultan Abdulhamid II then suspended parliament, partly holding them responsible for the defeat and feeling strong government was necessary following the instability that followed defeat. However, under Abdulhamid's autocracy, local governmental democracy flourished, and the empire continued to invest in education and modernisation of the empire. His autocracy, however bred resentment, which culminated in the Young Turk revolution, starting in 1908, which resulted in severe instability, which Italy took advantage of to seize Libya, and Greece, Bulgaria, Serbia and Montenegro seized the remaining Ottoman territories in Europe. Even so, the armed forces were modernised, and it took WWI to dismember the empire, and even then the Allies had a hard time, mainly due to underestimation. In Palestine the Ottomans held off a British army ten times its size for three years, and the Gallipoli campaign was also a success, where a young army officer, Mustafa Kemel (Ataturk) made his name. After the empire was defeated, he was able to muster an army that drove the Allied and Greek forces completely out of Turkey, and abolished the Sultanate which had failed to support him, and proclaimed the modern Turkish Republic. In the West, the 19th Century is often seen as a period of terminal decline for the Ottomans, which was the perception at the time, is totally inaccurate. Thanks to the reform movements, the Ottomans were incalculably stronger at the turn of the 20th Century than they were at the turn of the 19th Century.
Asked in World War 1, History of Europe, Ottoman Empire

What was the geographic extent of the Ottoman Empire during the rule of suleyman the magnificent?

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790,000 square miles ----------- There is a link to a map of the Ottoman Empire in 1566, when Suleiman the Magnificent died, below.
Asked in Ottoman Empire

Why does Suleiman deserve the title Magnificent?

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I Suleiman the magnificent deserve the title because i had fun time with your mother and your father at the same time while they were tied to the ratiator. Im gonna grape you in the mouth
Asked in History of Europe, Turkey (Country), Ottoman Empire

What is the importance of the ottoman empire?

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Ottoman empire universalize the civilizations of west and east
Asked in Ottoman Empire

How did the devshirme system help the ottoman empire?

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Devshirme enslaved young christian sons these boys converted to islam and educated in the ottoman empire top 10% given government jobs -change to rise to a high position 90% became Janissaries (army)-part of Sultan(ruler)'s personal army, very loyal and had a lot of power promotion based on ability (merit)
Asked in Ottoman Empire

What was the Ottoman Empire?

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It was an Turkish empire. Everyone was scared of them. That's why some idiots hate Turkish. (: Like Italians...! It was a Turkish empireand it is the biggest empire in history about all sides... art army humanity power etc
Asked in World War 1, Ottoman Empire

What is ottoman empire's relationship with Bosnia and other countries in the balkans?

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the ottoman empire had the relationship with bosina and was a treat to people in bosnia thoughtout the 15 th century
Asked in Iran, Ottoman Empire, Caliphates, Shiite Islam

What is difference between the Ottoman Empire and the Safavid Empire?

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The Ottoman Empire was controlled by Sunni Muslims, while the Safavid Empire was ruled by Shia Muslims.
Asked in Ottoman Empire

What were Suleiman accomplishments?

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He captured Belgrude and overthrew Serbia
Asked in History of Europe, Ottoman Empire

Weaknesses of the ottoman empire?

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In the 17th century began stagnation of the Turkish Society. Regression is more apparent in the next two centuries. Christian nations have begun to organize uprisings for liberation from the Turks, and Turkey has lost much of its territory. When they stopped conquering new territories, the Treasury stopped the most important revenue flow. The economy could not meet the great needs of the Sultan, administration, and especially the military, which is often recorded defeats.
Asked in History of Europe, Byzantine Empire, Ottoman Empire

How did the Ottoman Empire defeat the byzantine empire?

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The Ottomans had skilled soldiers, so over time they would conquer different parts slowly, and once they had defeated the last of the Byzantine Empire, the Ottoman Empire was now a large empire. The Ottoman Empire started off as a little community, but kept growing into a large empire, lead by a man named Osman.

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