Plants and Flowers

Ask questions about the thousands of species of plants and flowers in this category.

Asked in Herb Gardening, Plants and Flowers

What are the adaptations for sage brush?

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Sagebrush is a common plant throughout the Western part of the United States and is not related in any way to the herb known as sage. When it is wet, it does smell somewhat like the herb, a probable source of the name. Because it grows in hot, dry climates, sagebrush has adapted to minimal water requirements. It stores water in its small leaves and does not give up that water easily. So one adaptation is that its root system is able to obtain water when available. Its small waxy leaves close up their stomata (little openings on the bottom of the leaves) so as to hold on to water even during the hot, dry days. Another adaptation is the formation of bitter tasting oils found in the leaves and stems which protects it from being grazed down by herbivores (rabbits, sheep, deer). Pronghorn antelope, also native to the same regions, can tolerate grazing on sagebrush to some extent. The final adaptation is of a dual adaptation. First, sagebrush reproduces primarily through underground rhizomes. "Shoots" come off the main plant and then form a new plant some distance away. This is an adaptation to the environment because the new little plant can rely on water and nutrients from the mother plant until it develops its own root system. Second, because sagebrush does not tolerate fire and cannot come back from roots or rhizomes after a fire, it also produces seeds on a high stalk which are wind borne when mature. Seeds from plants not affected by the fire can be blown into the area which was burned off. As soon as water is available, usually from rain, the seeds can germinate and get started in the nutrient-rich ash left behind from the fire.
Asked by Darian Altenwerth in Saint Patrick's Day, Holidays and Traditions, Plants and Flowers

What’s the difference between a four-leaf clover and a shamrock?

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I guess I get where this can be confusing, because both are clovers, but it’s pretty clear: A shamrock has three leaves, and a four-leaf clover has, well, four. Though there are around 300 species of clover, a shamrock isn't one of them—in fact, it could be any of them. Any type of clover that typically has three leaves can be considered a shamrock. The shamrock is the main symbol of St. Patrick’s Day and all things Irish because it’s supposedly what St. Patrick used to illustrate the concept of the Holy Trinity. Four-leaf clovers, on the other hand, are just freaks of nature in those same species of clover.
Asked in Plants and Flowers, Roses

Is there such thing as a purple rose?

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There are light purple or lavender roses, and even roses called "purple splash" that are part purple and have small and few petals. As for the traditional looking Tea Rose that is Purple?...not yet. It seems Blue and Purple are the most difficult colors to create in roses. Happy Gardening, Coach Dave community.homedepot
Asked in Botany or Plant Biology, Plants and Flowers

What are the similarities and differences of rose and fortune plant?

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Both need water and sunlight, and both have an odor. Roses bloom yearly, while Fortune Plants may only bloom now and then or never.
Asked in Synonyms and Antonyms, Plants and Flowers, Photosynthesis

What are some synonyms for photosynthesis?

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Photosynthesis is the synthesis of using sunlight as the source of energy and with the aid of chlorophyll and associated pigments. Also, photo means light from the loan-translation of German. A synonym for photosynthesis could be light construction. Carbon assimilation is synonym for photosynthesis
Asked in Plants and Flowers, Taxonomy, Roses

What is the scientific name for purple roses?

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The rose is a type of flowering shrub and the scientific name for purple roses is Rosa.The flowers of the rose grow in many different colors, from the well-known red rose to yellow roses and sometimes white or purple roses.
Asked in Plants and Flowers, Arts and Crafts, Flower Gardening

Can you make a candle out of a sampaguita flower?

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yes. I have never heard of making a candle out of a flower before. Maybe use the flower as a base and dip it in hot wax over and over again and put a wick in the center. However, it should be possible to extract oil from the flower, retaining it's smell of jasmine. If you had enough of them, you would be able to scent a candle. You could also embed the flower itself in the hot wax and not only get some scent out of it as it burns, but it would look pretty at the side of the candle. A bit more: I would advise letting the flower dry first, otherwise the moisture in the flower may rot inside the wax. You can dry flowers using a food dehydrator, or by placing them in the oven on the top rack, and on the "warm" setting for about 30 minutes, then turn off the oven and let them remain overnight without opening the oven door.
Asked in Plants and Flowers, Botany or Plant Biology, Lilies

What are the characteristics of a tiger lily?

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Its characterized by an erect stem sprouting from a scaly bulb, numerous narror sessily leaves, and one or more large and erect or nodding flowers.
Asked in Plants and Flowers, Flower Gardening

What do you call many flowers on one stem?

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A florist calls many flowers on one stem a "spray"; for example spray mums or spray roses. A botanist would call a number of flowers on one stem an "inflorescence" and then use other words to describe how exactly the flowers are arranged on the stem, such as "spike" (ex. snapdragons), "panicle" (ex. blue flax) or "umbel" (ex. yarrow).
Asked in Plants and Flowers, Symbolism and Symbolic Meanings, Roses

What does 6 red roses and 1 pink rose mean?

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You'd have to ask the person who sent them to you to know for sure, but my interpretation would be that the red roses represent love, while the single pink rose could mean that out of a sea of potential loves, you are 'the one'.
Asked in Science Experiments, Science, Plants and Flowers, Photosynthesis

Can photosynthesis occur under water?

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Yes, although only when the water is clear and shallow enough for sunlight to travel through the water to plants like algae helping them survive. However, some algea species are able to live further down and photosynthesize. Rhodophyta, red algea, is able to photosynthesize because of a pigment called phycoerythrin which allows them to absorb more blue light wavelengths. The fact that it can absorb blue light is important these shorter wavelengths are able to penetrate into the water further.
Asked in Wedding Planning, Plants and Flowers, Flower Gardening

What is A person who sells flower is called?

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A person who sells flowers are called flower seller or a florist.
Asked in Plants and Flowers

Where is horticulture practised?

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In gardens, greenhouses and farms.
Asked in Plants and Flowers

How long has mint been around?

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Mint is a natural plant, so it's probably been around for millions of years.
Asked in Plants and Flowers, Video Games

Where are the flowers on spark city world?

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there ever were but once you get to 14 15 is hard to find
Asked in Plants and Flowers

Are blue orchids real?

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yes. of course! blue orchids can be made by putting a white orchid plant into a bottle of blue-coloured water, then observe it by a few days later. IT WILL TURN BLUE! try it!
Asked in Botany or Plant Biology, Plants and Flowers

Does fish oil benefit plant growth?

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not at all, if anything it would be worse for the plant
Asked in Plants and Flowers, India

What could symbolize strength?

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Maybe a Bald Eagle or a huge muscle a muscle or a weight a muscle or a weight
Asked in Plants and Flowers, Coco Chanel, Purses and Handbags

Is chanel serial number 10218184 real?

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Definitely 100% Original , there are copies of all chanel bags

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