Psychiatry

Psychiatry is a branch of medicine that deals with the mental health of patients. Psychiatrists have the ability to prescribe medication, while psychologists do not.

1,285 Questions
Psychiatry

Which option may help explain superstitions?

A. illusory correlations

B. negative correlations

C. positive correlations

D. causal correlations

Answer: C

BY LECHO648

414243
Health
Celebrities
Doctors
Dr. Phil
Talk Show Hosts
Psychiatry

Does dr. Phil have a degree and license in psychiatry?

In response to the most recent answer:

"I have found no evidence that Dr. Phil has his M.D. Dr. Phil practiced as a Clinical Psychologist not a Psychiatrist. The difference between the 2 are actually very different."

I actually typed a really helpful and informative response to this question and you replaced it with the mess above... Dr. Phil did not obtain his M.D. He WAS licensed clinical psychologist. He is NO LONGER LICENSED to practice, because of an ethical violation, which resulted in the loss of his license. He now works as the "Dr. Phil" we all know- using completely inappropriate, confrontational methods to shame people into "changing." He has created an empire for himself and capitalizes on the ignorance (no offense intended) of the general public to promote himself. What he does is not psychology and not what we practice in our field.

-sd Clinical Psych Doc Student in Mississippi

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Authors, Poets, and Playwrights
Psychiatry

Who is H. Beran Wolfe?

W. Beran Wolfe, M.D. (1900 - 1935) was a psychiatrist and author.

404142
Health
Doctors
Psychiatry

Where can you gain experience in psychiatry?

You can go to nearby hospitals and ask for intern experience within the psychiatry department. As well, you can look in the phone book for local psychiatrists, call them and ask if you can shadow them for pertinent experience. Remember that you will get your best experience opportunities at teaching hospitals... those are hospitals associated with universities or you can contact local hospitals to see if they are a community type hospital (public hospitals, private hospitals are motivated by profit and may not be inclined to teaching).

313233
Criminal Law
Psychiatry
Legal Definitions

What is the difference between medically insane and legally insane?

Insanity is a legal term that describes a person’s mental incompetence and moral responsibility. It is a legal concept that helps a court distinguish guilt from innocence. It has no specific medical meaning and there is no “insane” diagnosis in the DSM. It was used in the past to denote severe mental illness and psychosis.


Legal insanity is informed by psychiatrists who evaluate defendants and then submit written reports to the court. It answers such questions as whether the defendant can distinguish reality from fantasy, distinguish right from wrong, form intent, conduct his/her affairs, or is subject to uncontrollable impulsive behavior.

101112
Health
Psychology
Psychiatry

What is the difference between health psychology and clinical psychology?

Clinical psychology and health psychology are not entirely separated fields of research or practice. Nonetheless, clinical psychology focuses on the causes, prevention, and treatment of abnormal psychological disorders, while health psychology focuses on the causes, prevention and treatment of physical disorders that are impacted by psychological processes. Health psychology grew from clinical psychology as a sub-specialty. It has previously been known as behavioral medicine. How people respond to the dissemination of health education, how they make decisions about harmful behaviors (e.g., smoking or drug use), how they manage complex diseases (e.g., diabetes), how to impact psycho-physiological disorders (e.g., essential hypertension or psychologically induced urticaria), and how to reduce stress that exacerbates physical disorders are instances of the foci of health psychology. A related field that has emerged over the past couple of decades is psycho-neuro-immunology.

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Job Training and Career Qualifications
Psychiatry

What education and training is required to become a psychiatrist?

A psychiatrist is a medical physician specializing in treatment of the mind.

It's not easy to become a real-life Dr. Frasier Crane. At a minimum, you have to complete four years of college, then four years of medical school and, finally, four years of psychiatry residency training.

Say about 10 years start to finish.

Answer

Step 1

Take lots of science courses in high school to best prepare yourself for a college premedical program. Include physics, chemistry and biology.

Step 2

Visit the Medical Schools Web page (aamc.org/medicalschools.htm) for a list of U.S. and Canadian medical schools. Contact your top choices about the college premedical courses that you'll need for admission.

Step 3

Peruse the Princeton Review Web site (review.com) for a listing of colleges and their programs. Send for catalogs and applications. Be certain that the colleges to which you apply offer all the prerequisite premedical courses.

Step 4

Maintain a high grade point average, especially in your science courses. The competition for medical school is intense.

Step 5

Take the Medical Admission Test (MCAT) at the end of your junior year in college. Ask your adviser how to best handle the paperwork involved in medical school applications.

Step 6

Complete four years of medical school, pass your medical boards, and you will have your medical degree (such as a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree, a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree, or a Bachelor of Surgery/Bachelor of Medicine (MBBS/MBChB) degree depending on the country in which you attend medical school) and, most likely, an enormous loan to repay.

Step 7

Begin your four-year residency in psychiatry, which is actually on-the-job training for which you will receive a salary. Depending on the state in which you work as a resident, you will take your medical licensing examination sometime during this period.

Step 8

Consider continuing your training to receiving board certification in a subspecialty such as forensic psychiatry, child psychiatry or geriatric psychiatry.

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Psychiatry

Is collingwood Psychiatric Hospital real?

While it's not completely beyond the bounds of possibility that there may be or have been, in some place at some time, a psychiatric hospital by the name of "Collingwood", the one in the movie Grave Encounters is fictional.

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Salary and Pay Rates
Psychiatry

How much do you get paid an hour as a psychiatrist?

Depending on the location anywhere from $65-$125 an hour. A small town psychiatrist get about $65. In a major city you might see $125 an hour. --Actually, psychiatrists can make anywhere from 125-175+ an hour. If your a psychiatrist and your only charging 65$ an hour-you might have well skipped med school and just became a psychologist. Annual income for a first year psychiatrist is about 120,000+ and this number increases with expirence (popularity in your area-if patient's are recommending you) and hours put in. Many psychiatrist make 150k-200k a year. And in some cases, more-all depending on how many patient's you have, how much you charge per hour, and the amount of hours you put in
$65-$125 an hour

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Mental Health
Jobs
Psychiatry

What country has and needs psychiatrists?

Countries that Need PsychiatristsIn all of UK and republic of Ireland psychiatrists are needed and do practice.We in the western world have the highest level of sucides sepression and other psychiatric illness's. needless to say people need to see someone who specials in this field. To the best of my knowledge America, Europe also invest in psychiatry. I can,t say this for 100pc but am aware americ uses psychiatrists. There is NOTHING wrong with a psychiatrist. Mental health problems are on the increase, abuse of alochol,drugs, gambelling etc. Domestic violence, sexual abuse dysfunctional families.Personally I attend a psychiatrist, finding support benifical. Alongside a family doctor, community psychiatric nurse, I've tackled my illness. The psychiatrist oversees my medication' altering or changing drugs as need be. General PointGood psychiatrists are in demand in all the more prosperous countries. It might be worth trying to find out a bit about the various specialisms within psychiatry. For example, some specialize in severe personality disorders (schizophrenia, paranoia).
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Health
Graduate Degrees
Psychiatry

How long does it take to earn a doctorate in psychiatry?

It would take approximately eight years beyond high school completion.

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Health
Graduate Degrees
Psychiatry

What schooling to take to work in psychiatry field?

A Psychiatrist is a medical doctor (physician) with a specially in psychiatry.

Formal education and training requirements for physicians are among the most demanding of any occupation-4 years of undergraduate school, 4 years of medical school, and 3 to 8 years of internship and residency, depending on the specialty selected. A few medical schools offer combined undergraduate and medical school programs that last 6 rather than the customary 8 years.

Premedical students must complete undergraduate work in physics, biology, mathematics, English, and inorganic and organic chemistry. Students also take courses in the humanities and the social sciences. Some students volunteer at local hospitals or clinics to gain practical experience in the health professions.

The minimum educational requirement for entry into a medical school is 3 years of college; most applicants, however, have at least a bachelor's degree, and many have advanced degrees. There are 146 medical schools in the United States-126 teach allopathic medicine and award a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree; 20 teach osteopathic medicine and award the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree. Acceptance to medical school is highly competitive. Applicants must submit transcripts, scores from the Medical College Admission Test, and letters of recommendation. Schools also consider an applicant's character, personality, leadership qualities, and participation in extracurricular activities. Most schools require an interview with members of the admissions committee.

Students spend most of the first 2 years of medical school in laboratories and classrooms, taking courses such as anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, microbiology, pathology, medical ethics, and laws governing medicine. They also learn to take medical histories, examine patients, and diagnose illnesses. During their last 2 years, students work with patients under the supervision of experienced physicians in hospitals and clinics, learning acute, chronic, preventive, and rehabilitative care. Through rotations in internal medicine, family practice, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and surgery, they gain experience in the diagnosis and treatment of illness.

Following medical school, almost all M.D.s enter a residency-graduate medical education in a specialty that takes the form of paid on-the-job training, usually in a hospital. Most D.O.s serve a 12-month rotating internship after graduation and before entering a residency, which may last 2 to 6 years.

All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians. To be licensed, physicians must graduate from an accredited medical school, pass a licensing examination, and complete 1 to 7 years of graduate medical education. Although physicians licensed in one State usually can get a license to practice in another without further examination, some States limit reciprocity. Graduates of foreign medical schools generally can qualify for licensure after passing an examination and completing a U.S. residency.

M.D.s and D.O.s seeking board certification in a specialty may spend up to 7 years in residency training, depending on the specialty. A final examination immediately after residency or after 1 or 2 years of practice also is necessary for certification by a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialists (ABMS) or the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). The ABMS represents 24 specialty boards, ranging from allergy and immunology to urology. The AOA has approved 18 specialty boards, ranging from anesthesiology to surgery. For certification in a subspecialty, physicians usually need another 1 to 2 years of residency.

A physician's training is costly. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, in 2004 more than 80 percent of medical school graduates were in debt for educational expenses.

People who wish to become physicians must have a desire to serve patients, be self-motivated, and be able to survive the pressures and long hours of medical education and practice. Physicians also must have a good bedside manner, emotional stability, and the ability to make decisions in emergencies. Prospective physicians must be willing to study throughout their career in order to keep up with medical advances.

For the source and more detailed information concerning this subject, click on the related links section indicated below.

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Depression and Bipolar Disorder
Psychological Disorders
Psychiatry

What is self-condemnation?

In certain situations, self condemnation is a form of depression where a person blames oneself for failures in life.

345
Health
Doctors
Psychiatry

Can you get a DO in psychiatry?

Absolutely, you can do a psychiatry residency after obtaining the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine medical degree (D.O.) There are D.O. residencies in psychiatry, however you can also do M.D. residencies as a D.O. in many specialties (including psychiatry and even surgery). Some may argue that the allopathic residencies are more difficult to obtain if you have a D.O. degree rather than an M.D. degree b/c the spots are "reserved for an MD", but I think if you're comparing two applications, one a D.O. w/better credentials/grades and the other an M.D. w/poorer credentials/grades, the D.O. can very well be picked for the residency spot over the M.D. Hope that helped!

232425
Health
Doctors
Psychiatry

What are the advantages of psychiatry?

Intellectually challenging. The money is good. Flexible schedules. You get to help people.

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Health
Doctors
Psychiatry

Is psychiatry a medical degree?

Yes it is. A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (MD) with a specialty in psychiatry.

Yes it is. A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (MD) with a specialty in psychiatry.

Yes it is. A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (MD) with a specialty in psychiatry.

Yes it is. A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (MD) with a specialty in psychiatry.

Yes it is. A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (MD) with a specialty in psychiatry.

Yes it is. A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (MD) with a specialty in psychiatry.

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Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Psychiatry

What do you do when you're helpless?

It's unclear what you mean here by 'helpless', so I'll give two answers, one of which will suit your situation.

If you feel helpless in an abusive relationship, get out fast! Before you do, seek help and advice from one of the many support groups that can be contacted in your area, by telephone or on the internet. Do not believe your partner will change, because that rarely happens.


If you feel helpless because life seems to be passing you by, then you need comfort and support, but also people who can guide you. Sometimes this can be a simple as praying to your god or attending a place of worship and perhaps talking to your religious leader. If things seem too bad, or if you are finding yourself in deep depression, then seek professional advice. More often, it is a matter of finding ways of meeting people with common interests and spending less time alone. Gradually, you will be offered support and advice, and perhaps people will become informal mentors.

012
Health
Men's Health
Psychiatry

What is wrong with you you woke up in the middle of the night your thoughts were sped up you had voices in your head warning you of things you have since have similar episode since?

It is difficult to provide any kind of "diagnosis" online because patients need to be physically examined by a medical professional in order to get an official, accurate answer.
Please bear in mind that I am not a doctor nor a psychologist. My knowledge of psychology comes from academically studying some forensic psychology.


What you are describing does sound a little bit to me like a syndrome called Alice in Wonderland Syndrome (AIWS). It's named after the famous novel by Lewis Carrol. It is a neurological syndrome.

You may wake up feeling like you have been in or are still in a feverish nightmare. With AIWS, your visual and sound perceptions would be "weird", you may hear things that aren't really there (it could be whispering, talking or shouting) and you may see things around you differently. You may feel panicked and afraid, in some cases you may have a panic attack.


Those with AIWS experience or may experience:

  • Micropsia, which is an abnormal visual condition where the individual perceives things as smaller than they actually are.

  • Macropsia, an abnormal visual condition similar to the one above, but where the individual perceives things as bigger than they actually are

  • Distorted shapes. A round table for example may suddenly appear triangular.

  • Migraine.

  • Fear, anxiety and panic attacks.

  • High fever.

  • Hearing voices that are not really there.

  • Amplified hearing perception. A gentle tap may sound like a booming bang.

  • Things around you appear to have been "sped up" or happening in fast-forward.

  • Tinnitus (ringing or whistling in the ears).

  • The feeling of nausea.

  • Dizzy spells.

  • Hallucinations (seeing things that are not there or seeing things where they shouldn't be, for example people in the room or rabbits hopping on the ceiling. Hallucinations are strange, completely random things).

  • Lack of spatial perspective (no sense or recognition of time).



The causes are not really clear. But AIWS has been associated with migraines, epilepsy and Epstein-Barr virus. Brain tumours and brain damage caused by psychoactive drugs are also other suggested causes. Check to see if there is a history of migraines or epilepsy in your family, as this information may be important to a doctor or neurologist when you visit one.

AIWS episodes are seemingly random and can occur in all ages. It is mostly common in childhood to early 20's. But there have been cases of people affected into their 70's.

I strongly advise you to visit a doctor, who may refer you to a neurologist. Feel free to mention that someone suggested it might be Alice in Wonderland Syndrome. But do remember that I am not a qualified doctor nor neurologist, just someone who has studied forensic psychology a bit. It may not even be AIWS, the only way to get a real diagnosis is to physically visit a professional in the medical field.



Further reading:



012
Brain
Psychiatry

Has psychiatry ever caused brain damage and birth defects?

Psychiatry is more than medications and treatments. So it is not psychiatry, itself, that is responsible for any ill effects.

SOME medications and treatments, used in the Practice of Medicine, which includes the sub-specialty of psychiatry, have been responsible for ill effects. But this is an expected hazard of progress in the Practice of Medicine as well as culture. For example, today surgeons know to keep a patient with a belly wound "NPO", meaning "give nothing by mouth". But in the early Practice of Medicine, bacteria were not known-- that discovery came later. So many people died from abdominal wounds, especially in early wars and traumas, because no one knew anything better than to let a patient eat and drink fluids. Even the English let wounded soldiers drink tea, until doctors figured out that this could cause vomiting, aspiration of vomit into the lungs, and death.


Anesthesia was another area that needed time to educate men (doctors) about its hazards. Chloroform, one of the first anesthetic inhalation compounds used for surgery, was a godsend to people who before would have died from wounds or infections. Just a simple infected abscessed tooth could kill. Yet, at the same time, Chloroform brought unexpected dangers--including fire, and including putting a patient so far "under" that the patient died from respiratory depression. We didn't have machines to monitor dosages, or monitor heart and respiration. So, yes, people died on the operating table.


Psychiatry does not "operate", but some treatments have evolved over time. For example, in 1800s "insane asylums", patients were often put into "ice baths". They were restrained in a tub filled with ice below, on top, and surrounding the person. Doctors, back then, did not know ice could be such a shock that it could stop a person's heart, or that a person could become hypothermic. Doctors back then believed the physical "shock" of ice cold temp could astound a patient so much that it would interrupt psychosis, depression, and "catatonic" reactions to life's problems. Years later, hospitals used "steam baths", looking for a mental-emotional change in symptoms, but still unaware of any dangers. (Neither steam baths or ice baths are used now, and "mental institutions" were closed, finally, in the 1980s.)


However, controversies remain about ECT, Electroconvulsive therapy, in which current is passed through the brain to bring about a change in major severe depression, acute mania, and certain schizophrenic syndromes. Patients who have undergone ECT say the current destroyed their long term memories and creates long-lasting confusion. In use for 60-some years, today, ECT is administered to an estimated 100,000 people a year, and is the subject of much controversy. Results vary, widely.


Turning strictly to birth defects...

Birth defects must occur during pregnancy for the condition to be a birth defect. Nothing is done directly to the fetus, but until the 1950s, doctors did not know that many medications pass from the maternal blood stream to the fetus, or from breast milk to a newborn (when an acquired condition could result). However, there is no central database list of medications that DO cause birth defects. INSTEAD, now, ALL medications are assumed to pass from maternal blood to the fetus. Therefore, IF a mother MUST have a medication, doctors try to limit the dose AND duration of the medication for at least the first 2 trimesters of pregnancy.


No doctor wants a medication or treatment to do harm (to an adult, child, or fetus). Developed countries like the US oversee medications and side effect reports. Extensive animal and human studies and reporting of bad effects makes US medication prescribing one of the safest systems in the world. Yet, it is impossible to predict all problems beforehand.


In short, the answer to your question about birth defects is No, except before 1950 when little was known about how chemicals pass from mother to fetus.

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Health
Doctors
Psychiatry

How many years does it take to get a doctorate in psychiatry?

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor with a specialty in psychiatry, which takes approximately eight years post high school completion.

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor with a specialty in psychiatry, which takes approximately eight years post high school completion.

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor with a specialty in psychiatry, which takes approximately eight years post high school completion.

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor with a specialty in psychiatry, which takes approximately eight years post high school completion.

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor with a specialty in psychiatry, which takes approximately eight years post high school completion.

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor with a specialty in psychiatry, which takes approximately eight years post high school completion.

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Christianity
Religion & Spirituality
Rhetorical Questions
Psychiatry

What is the main purpose for having a purpose?

I've spent a lot of time learning, and trying to understand why having purpose in life is so important. I finally came to an understanding. Having a purpose in life, and following through with it, gives the person both a sense of meaning, and worth in their life, as well as fulfillment. When one feels like they are fulfilling their purpose they are much more likely to live a happier, and more enjoyable life. As well as feeling as though there is worth in their existence. Fulfilling your purpose here can make people feel whole, and feel good about themselves.

____________________________________________________________

To satisfy a feeling of belonging or want for yourself to fit in.

The idea of having a purpose is a "benign delusion" that helps most people cope with life's meaningless stresses and incomprehensible disasters. If you can find a way to abandon the "benign delusion" of having a purpose and still cope with the hard parts of reality you might do better. However if the "benign delusion" of having a purpose includes other people, I cannot recommend abandoning it as that may be less benign than just keeping the delusion undisturbed.

The function in evolution of "benign delusions" such as having a purpose, etc. are usually to assist binding human societies, human groups, and human families together. The systems in the brain for their formation evolved long before language did (most primates and some other mammals and certain bird species also can form them), so beliefs had to form faster than they could be verified. Now our language often shows us the beliefs formed in "benign delusions" are wrong and that is very hard to accept.

The very same brain systems that support "benign delusions" can support clinical delusions, causing many mental illnesses. The very brain wiring that helps hold our societies and relationships together, is the root of delusional mental illness.

Really,,,,having purpose is a "benign delusion"?? Then just about every human being is delusional. Explain that concept please. The simple purpose of keeping oneself alive and well is a benign illusion?

192021
Health
Doctors
Psychiatry

What is the Relationship of Psychology to Psychiatry?

they are pretty much the same except a psychiatrist can prescribe medications while a psychologist can not.

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Job Training and Career Qualifications
Doctors
Psychiatry

What qualifications are needed to become a psychiatrist?

A psychiatrist is a physician with a specialty in psychiatry. Thus, the following is by and according to the U.S. Department of Labor and particular to the education and training required for a physician. The common path to practicing as a physician requires 8 years of education beyond high school and 3 to 8 additional years of internship and residency. All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians. Education and training. Formal education and training requirements for physicians are among the most demanding of any occupation-4 years of undergraduate school, 4 years of medical school, and 3 to 8 years of internship and residency, depending on the specialty selected. A few medical schools offer combined undergraduate and medical school programs that last 6 years rather than the customary 8 years. Premedical students must complete undergraduate work in physics, biology, mathematics, English, and inorganic and organic chemistry. Students also take courses in the humanities and the social sciences. Some students volunteer at local hospitals or clinics to gain practical experience in the health professions. The minimum educational requirement for entry into medical school is 3 years of college; most applicants, however, have at least a bachelor's degree, and many have advanced degrees. There are 146 medical schools in the United States-126 teach allopathic medicine and award a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree; 20 teach osteopathic medicine and award the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree. Acceptance to medical school is highly competitive. Applicants must submit transcripts, scores from the Medical College Admission Test, and letters of recommendation. Schools also consider an applicant's character, personality, leadership qualities, and participation in extracurricular activities. Most schools require an interview with members of the admissions committee. Students spend most of the first 2 years of medical school in laboratories and classrooms, taking courses such as anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, microbiology, pathology, medical ethics, and laws governing medicine. They also learn to take medical histories, examine patients, and diagnose illnesses. During their last 2 years, students work with patients under the supervision of experienced physicians in hospitals and clinics, learning acute, chronic, preventive, and rehabilitative care. Through rotations in internal medicine, family practice, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and surgery, they gain experience in the diagnosis and treatment of illness. Following medical school, almost all M.D.s enter a residency-graduate medical education in a specialty that takes the form of paid on-the-job training, usually in a hospital. Most D.O.s serve a 12-month rotating internship after graduation and before entering a residency, which may last 2 to 6 years. A physician's training is costly. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, in 2004 more than 80 percent of medical school graduates were in debt for educational expenses. Licensure and certification. All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians. To be licensed, physicians must graduate from an accredited medical school, pass a licensing examination, and complete 1 to 7 years of graduate medical education. Although physicians licensed in one State usually can get a license to practice in another without further examination, some States limit reciprocity. Graduates of foreign medical schools generally can qualify for licensure after passing an examination and completing a U.S. residency. M.D.s and D.O.s seeking board certification in a specialty may spend up to 7 years in residency training, depending on the specialty. A final examination immediately after residency or after 1 or 2 years of practice also is necessary for certification by a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialists (ABMS) or the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). The ABMS represents 24 boards related to medical specialties ranging from allergy and immunology to urology. The AOA has approved 18 specialty boards, ranging from anesthesiology to surgery. For certification in a subspecialty, physicians usually need another 1 to 2 years of residency. Other qualifications. People who wish to become physicians must have a desire to serve patients, be self-motivated, and be able to survive the pressures and long hours of medical education and practice. Physicians also must have a good bedside manner, emotional stability, and the ability to make decisions in emergencies. Prospective physicians must be willing to study throughout their career to keep up with medical advances. Advancement. Some physicians and surgeons advance by gaining expertise in specialties and subspecialties and by developing a reputation for excellence among their peers and patients. Many physicians and surgeons start their own practice or join a group practice. Others teach residents and other new doctors, and some advance to supervisory and managerial roles in hospitals, clinics, and other settings. For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated below this answer box.

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Microsoft Windows
Psychiatry

What is klonodine used for?

It's prescribed antihypertensive agent, treatment of neuropathic pain, opioid detoxification, sleep hyperhidrosis, anesthetics use, and off-label, to counter the side effects of stimulant medications such as methylphenidate or amphetamine. It is becoming a more accepted treatment for insomnia, as well as for relief of menopausal symptoms.

Clonidine is increasingly used in conjunction with stimulants to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), for which it is administered in late afternoon or evening for sleep, and because it sometimes helps moderate ADHD-associated impulsive and oppositional behavior, and may reduce tics. Clonidine can be used in the treatment of Tourette syndrome. Clonidine is also a mild sedative, and can be used as premedication before surgery or procedures.

91011
Mental Health
Conditions and Diseases
Religion & Spirituality
Psychiatry

Is it true that religion was once classified by the American Psychiatric Association as a mental disorder?

was and still is read some text of the early 60s

Yes and still is. If only one person held these variety of religious beliefs, it'll all become too apparent. Talking snake, flying to heaven, eternal torture (by a "loving God"), angry God drowns the whole world (including children), but saves animals, walking on water, turning water into wine, having a relationship with the creator of the known universe, rising from the dead, talking to an invisible being (ie, Jesus), thinking God answers your prayers while millions of kids are dying from starvation, etc.

It's called being delusional.

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