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Respiratory System

The respiratory system includes the lungs and the airway. The questions in this category focus mainly on the anatomical and physiological processes associated with breathing.

2,891 Questions

Where does glycolysis start in aerobic respiration and where is it completed?

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Glycolysis starts in the cytoplasm of the cell and is completed in the mitochondrial matrix in aerobic respiration.

What is the difference between aerobic respiration and anaerbic respiration?

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Aerobic respiration requires oxygen to break down glucose into energy, producing carbon dioxide and water as byproducts. Anaerobic respiration occurs without oxygen and produces less energy, with byproducts such as lactic acid or ethanol. Aerobic respiration is more efficient and is the preferred method for most organisms, while anaerobic respiration is used in environments with low oxygen levels.

What is anaerobic respiration and give two examples of anaerobic respiration?

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Anaerobic respiration is a type of cellular respiration that occurs in the absence of oxygen, yielding energy by breaking down glucose. Examples of anaerobic respiration include fermentation in yeast cells, where glucose is converted into ethanol and carbon dioxide, and lactic acid fermentation in muscle cells, where glucose is converted into lactic acid.

What prevents food entering trachea when swallowing?

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The epiglottis is a flap of tissue located in the throat that covers the trachea during swallowing, preventing food from entering. Additionally, the muscles in the throat contract to push the food down the esophagus towards the stomach, instead of allowing it to enter the trachea.

What are the parts of conducting portion of the respiratory system?

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The conducting portion of the respiratory system consists of the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles. These structures help transport air from the outside environment to the site of gas exchange in the lungs. They also help to filter, warm, and humidify the air before it reaches the delicate alveoli.

Do you in hale or exhale when the volume of the chest cavity increases?

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The air pressure in your chest cavity increases when you are exhaling. For air to leave your lungs, it must be at a higher pressure than the air outside. Your diaphragm pushes up against your chest cavity causing the space in your lungs to get smaller. If the volume decreases, the pressure has to rise. Don't believe me? start exhaling, then close your mouth. Your cheeks will puff out because the pressure inside is greater than the pressure outside.

What does 'anaerobic respiration is far less efficient than aerobic respiration' mean?

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Anaerobic respiration produces less energy compared to aerobic respiration because oxygen is not involved in the final stages of energy production. This results in the inefficient breakdown of glucose and the production of less ATP per glucose molecule.

Is respiratory therapist required in or?

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Yes, respiratory therapists are required in Oregon to provide specialized care and treatment for patients with breathing-related disorders. They play a crucial role in managing conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and help patients with respiratory issues improve lung function and overall quality of life.

What is the name of the respiratory system of insects which is composed of branching tubes with openings to the outside?

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The respiratory system of insects is called the tracheal system. It consists of a network of branching tubes called tracheae that deliver oxygen directly to the cells and remove waste gases. These tubes have openings called spiracles on the surface of the insect's body.

Is the diaphragm bigger than the lungs or vice versa?

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The lungs are bigger than the diaphragm. The diaphragm is a dome-shaped muscle located beneath the lungs. When it contracts, it flattens out, creating more space in the chest cavity for the lungs to expand.

When the air pressure in the lungs is greater than the air pressure outside the body you?

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exhale, as the air will flow from an area of higher pressure (lungs) to an area of lower pressure (outside the body). This helps to expel carbon dioxide and regulate the level of oxygen in the body.

What happens if you inhale a pea?

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Inhaling a small object like a pea can cause it to get stuck in the airway, leading to difficulty breathing, coughing, or choking. If this happens, seek medical help immediately to have the object removed safely.

What is a product if cellular respiration and not fermentation?

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The end products of cellular respiration are carbon dioxide, water, and ATP (adenosine triphosphate). These products are generated through the breakdown of glucose and other organic molecules in the presence of oxygen in the mitochondria of the cell. Fermentation, on the other hand, produces end products such as alcohol or lactic acid in the absence of oxygen.

What is progressive evolution of respiratory and circulatory systems in vertebrates?

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The progressive evolution of respiratory and circulatory systems in vertebrates involves adaptations that improve oxygen delivery to tissues. For example, the transition from gills to lungs allowed terrestrial vertebrates to breathe air more efficiently, while the development of a double circulatory system (pulmonary and systemic circuits) in mammals enhances oxygen distribution throughout the body. These evolutionary changes have contributed to the success of vertebrates in diverse environments.

How do horses respiratory system temporarily adapt to different altitudes?

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At higher altitudes, horses may breathe more rapidly and deeply to compensate for the decreased levels of oxygen in the air. This helps them take in more oxygen to meet their body's demands despite the lower oxygen availability. Additionally, horses may experience an increase in red blood cell production to enhance oxygen-carrying capacity and adapt to the thinner air.

What system does the respiratory system work with?

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The respiratory system works closely with the circulatory system. The respiratory system is responsible for exchanging oxygen and carbon dioxide with the blood, while the circulatory system helps transport these gases to and from the cells in the body. Together, they ensure the body receives oxygen and removes carbon dioxide efficiently.

Have artificial respiration or oxygenation saved patients suffering from lack of oxygen?

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Yes, artificial respiration and oxygenation techniques have been essential in saving patients suffering from lack of oxygen. They help to provide vital oxygen to the body when the natural breathing process is compromised due to various medical conditions or emergencies. These interventions can help stabilize the patient's condition until further treatment can be provided.

What happens to the oxygen when it reaches the alveoli?

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When oxygen reaches the alveoli in the lungs, it diffuses from the air in the alveoli into the surrounding capillaries. The oxygen then binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which transports it to the body's tissues for use in cellular respiration.

What happen when you inhale the air of the toothpaste?

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Inhaling toothpaste fumes may cause irritation to the respiratory system, leading to coughing or throat irritation. It is best to avoid directly inhaling toothpaste fumes and instead use it as intended for oral hygiene. If you experience any adverse reactions, it's recommended to seek medical advice.

What are the materials needed in aerobic respiration and anaerobic respiration?

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In aerobic respiration, the materials needed are glucose (or other organic molecules), oxygen, and enzymes to catalyze the reaction. In anaerobic respiration, the materials needed are glucose (or other organic molecules) and enzymes to catalyze the reaction. Oxygen is not required for anaerobic respiration, and different types of anaerobic pathways may involve different materials such as nitrate or sulfate.

Is the brain a component of the cardio respiratory system?

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No, the brain is not a component of the cardio respiratory system. The cardio respiratory system consists of the heart, blood vessels, and lungs, and functions to provide oxygen to the body and remove waste gases. The brain, however, is part of the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. It is responsible for coordinating and controlling the body's activities.

What is the difference between the respiratory system and photosynthesis?

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The respiratory system is responsible for the exchange of gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide) between the body and the environment, providing oxygen for cellular respiration. Photosynthesis is the process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria convert light energy into chemical energy in the form of glucose, releasing oxygen as a byproduct. In summary, the respiratory system involves gas exchange in animals, while photosynthesis is a process unique to plants that converts light energy into chemical energy.

What is the function of the ciliated epithelium of the tracheobronchial tree?

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The ciliated epithelium of the tracheobronchial tree helps to remove mucus and foreign particles from the respiratory tract by moving them upwards towards the throat to be either swallowed or expelled. This movement of the cilia helps to protect the lungs from infections and irritants.

What are the smallest and most distal structures that remain a component of the conducting zone in the respiratory tract?

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The smallest and most distal structures that remain a part of the conducting zone in the respiratory tract are the terminal bronchioles. These bronchioles are the final branches of the conducting airways before reaching the respiratory zone where gas exchange occurs in the alveoli.

Which organism is most likely use for anaerobic respiration?

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Anaerobic bacteria such as certain strains of Escherichia coli and Clostridium are commonly used for anaerobic respiration in laboratory experiments.